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Slideshow: How 3D Printed Body Parts Are Changing Medicine

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Elizabeth M
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Re: BODY PARTS
Elizabeth M   6/10/2013 5:46:30 AM
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I agree with you bobjengr. And if you feel that way you may be interested in a couple of other stories I've written about medical technology making things better for people...this one out of MIT: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=259900

And this one: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=254901

bobjengr
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BODY PARTS
bobjengr   6/6/2013 5:38:04 PM
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This is absolutely fascinating to me Elizabeth.  I'm one of those that believes medicine combined with technology that can lessen human suffering is welcome where every found.  I think 3-D printing usable in this fashion is a remarkable application of the technology.  I applaud those medical practitioners and engineers attempting this application.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The nose
Ann R. Thryft   5/29/2013 11:45:33 AM
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I agree, Elizabeth, about both the speed of change in 3D printed organs and body parts, and how nanotech is enabling a lot of new technologies in this, and other, areas.

Elizabeth M
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Re: The nose
Elizabeth M   5/29/2013 5:53:03 AM
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Thanks for that link, Ann. This space seems to be evolving even faster than I thought. And the use of nanotechnology is interesting; it seems to be the way forward for lots of things these days.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The nose
Ann R. Thryft   5/28/2013 11:43:12 AM
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Here's another 3D printed ear: http://www.plasticstoday.com/articles/researchers-create-functional-3d-printed-ear05020201301

Elizabeth M
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Re: The nose
Elizabeth M   5/27/2013 5:36:55 AM
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Yes, Jack, there is definitely preparation and even after-care, like the application of a material on the nose to change its color to blend better with the patient's skin after the surgery. These types of procedures, as they are new, are still undertaken with much care and caution but I imagine some day they may become quite routine.

Elizabeth M
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Re: The nose
Elizabeth M   5/27/2013 4:08:23 AM
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Agree, JimT, the refabrication of live cells is probably the most impressive part of this work to me, as well. Creating these parts out of artificial materials isn't new, although the fabrication seems to be getting better and more realistic. But actually creating parts out of living tissue is, as you said, amazing.

Jack Rupert, PE
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Re: The nose
Jack Rupert, PE   5/21/2013 3:22:57 PM
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Reading the linked article, I got the impression that there still might be some "preparation" for the patient.  They mentioned how the ends are thinner and blend more easily, so I'm thinking that there is probably a bit of make-up (or similar) for the final blending.  The primary benefit is that it is very close to the actual skin tone so the blending isn't as difficult and that the texture looks like natural skin up close, rather than plastic.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: The nose
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   5/21/2013 12:15:08 PM
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I would have thought that earlobes could have been prosthetically implanted like a boob-job. The silicon material was around for decades. Also, the 3D modeling and printing of custom bone elements (skull & femur & jaw) seems like a logical step.   But the creation and printing of skin cells ( that nose ! ) & liver cells are truly 21st century, cutting edge, amazement. Those two win the prize, in my book.

Elizabeth M
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Re: The nose
Elizabeth M   5/15/2013 6:25:15 AM
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Thanks for your comments, sdoyle. Re: the nose, I think they actually can treat the artificial nose with something so it can change skin tone, so maybe the person who has it can do that as their skin changes during different months. Or maybe, as you said, they can just wear lots of SPF. As far as the liver goes, it's not ready for prime time, but they did manage to 3D fabricate liver tissue that is fully functioning, yes. I found that incredible as well!

As far as the 3D appendage as body art...I suppose we shall see where this trend will take us! I can't imagine people who didn't have prosthetic legs wanting to dress up the ones they already have (as we can do that with clothes already, but the miind boggles...and you never know.

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