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Raspberry Pi-Powered Projector Tells You How Fast You’re Riding Your Bike

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apresher
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Pi-Powered Projector
apresher   3/28/2013 10:47:40 AM
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Excellent article.  I agree that there seems to be potential interesting iterations of this technology.  Google maps and heart rate monitoring seems like great ideas, and it sounds like  you could provide a complete set of "dashboard intruments" to potentially measure speed, distance, etc.

Charles Murray
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Re: Pi-Powered Projector
Charles Murray   3/28/2013 7:07:15 PM
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I agree, Al. It's a great article and a great idea. If I were going to bet on a technology that will get snapped up by the marketplace, I'd bet on this. I think this guy has something big here. Like you, Al, I also like the other apps, especially the heart rate monitor.

a.saji
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Re: Pi-Powered Projector
a.saji   3/29/2013 12:04:00 AM
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@Muray: Indeed and if you know how to make use of AI it will help you in a great way. I think this is a great start and hope it will continue to pick on from this point onwards.  

bobjengr
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Raspberry Pi-Power
bobjengr   3/29/2013 11:27:18 AM
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Great post.  I know several guys who are really into biking and speed racing.  I mean they do 45 or 50 miles on weekends;  for around here with the hills, is insane.  They love it though. I agree with Charles, this concept will be picked up quickly when the hardware designs are solidified.  Adding GPS is a definite must and will provide value-added to the entire concept.  Could also be made an option.  I'm sending this link to my friends to get their "take" and will respond when they get back to me.  A great idea.

 

Zippy
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Hmmm...
Zippy   3/29/2013 11:58:10 AM
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I'm a big fan of DIY and this is very creative, but I'm a little bemused on the utility.  Cutting-edge bike techies will buy anything, but as a non-cutting edge biker I would never put a distraction like this in my headlight.  I would much rather maintain awareness of my surroundings than to know I was going exactly 15 mph when that cabbie broadsided me...

Noswad
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Gold
Could be.....
Noswad   3/29/2013 12:22:07 PM
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I could see a good use as a GPS driving directions type of gadget. I don't see too much need in knowing your speed though. I haven't seen too many cops ticketing bicycle riders for speeding.

Also, I didn't know Mulder was a biker.

Charles Murray
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Re: Hmmm...
Charles Murray   3/29/2013 7:06:42 PM
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Good point, Zippy. It is a bit of a distraction, since the driver is looking down when they should be looking ahead. Still, I find the video so interesting...

notarboca
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Re: Hmmm...
notarboca   3/30/2013 1:01:12 PM
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Yes, selling top end gadgets to bicyclists is almost a sure thing. I would like to see heartrate info next to the speed, because your're usually trying to keep heartrate within a narrow range for the best aerobic exercise.

jmiller
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Re: Hmmm...
jmiller   3/31/2013 12:05:15 PM
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I wonder how far we are from adding technologies that alert bike riders to the dangers that are coming at them.  "Dog on your right."  "Another bike coming up behind you."  "Watch out for a motorist on the right!"  We are seeing accident avoidance in cars already, will it go to bikes next?  Or will that just distract the rider and cause more problems.  Don't know.  Cool to see stuff like this expanding into other areas though.

naperlou
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Re: Pi-Powered Projector
naperlou   3/31/2013 10:14:46 PM
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This works at night, and looks really good.  It would be interesting to see if there is a display technology that would allow you to project this in some way to a point in front of the bike that was perhaps not the ground.  That would allow a display that could be used during the day and could integrate some of those other sources.  The Raspberry Pi platform could easily handle that.

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