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Robotic Advances in Aerospace Manufacturing

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Rob Spiegel
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Aerospace goes robotic
Rob Spiegel   4/4/2013 1:14:12 PM
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Interesting, Al, that aerospace is adopting robots. In some ways it seems late, in other ways, it's surprising the industry is using robots at all. It will be interesting to see whether aerospace also adopts inspection robotics the way that automotive did.

apresher
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Robotics in Aerospace
apresher   4/4/2013 4:53:34 PM
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Rob,  I agree with your comments. I'm sure that there have been plenty of robots used in aerospace mfg but there are significant opportunities moving ahead.  The size of the work cells definitely favors more manual labor than other industries but automation offers advantages as well.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Aerospace goes robotic
Ann R. Thryft   4/4/2013 8:13:10 PM
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One place where the use of robotics is occurring in aerospace manufacturing is in composite production and repair as we covered here:
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=243715

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Aerospace goes robotic
Cabe Atwell   4/5/2013 2:13:12 AM
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I hope this is a trend that catches on more. Robotic precision and repeatability is key to safety. That is, as long as they don't repeat mistakes.

A friend of mine's father hand crafts small airplanes as a side job. Although that might be a hip or cool to some, I think I would rather fly in a vehicle produced mostly by machines. No offense, but everyone overlooks a problem in a design at some point.

C

apresher
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Robotic Advances
apresher   4/5/2013 9:24:42 AM
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Ann,  Thanks for the link.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Aerospace goes robotic
Ann R. Thryft   4/5/2013 8:33:52 PM
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I disagree. Handcrafting is now a thing of the past, but European handmade shoes, leather goods and suits are still considered high-class, as were handmade Swiss watches when I was a kid. Much depends on infrastructure and collective corporate knowledge being passed down, such as in the old apprentice programs, or within a company when people stayed at one job most of their lives. If the person doing all the work is a perfectionist and very, very good at what he does, I'd rather fly in his plane than one made by a huge aircraft OEM with, apparently, massive QA problems that cause exploding batteries.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Aerospace goes robotic
Rob Spiegel   4/8/2013 10:49:19 AM
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Nice link, Ann. Do you know if the auto makers are also using robotics for composits? Actually, it would probably be the auto suppliers using it -- if it's geting used at all. It may be too expensive a process for auto.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Aerospace goes robotic
Ann R. Thryft   4/8/2013 2:44:56 PM
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Rob, automakers aren't really using composites yet. There are several R&D partnerships going on to help this move forward, as we've covered here (and see links at the end of the latest article) http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=261323 http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=249597 but no real results yet.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Aerospace goes robotic
Rob Spiegel   4/10/2013 5:37:05 PM
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Ann, I wasn't aware the auto industry isn't using composites yet. I've seen so many articles talking about composits in auto, and I've seen presentations on the use of CAE to analyze composites for use in auto, so I asumed it was already happening. Apparently not.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Aerospace goes robotic
Ann R. Thryft   5/9/2013 6:13:15 PM
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Not in anything resembling volume apps, Rob. There are various specialized apps where they're being used for some things, but they're mostly not structural yet.

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