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Rich's Video Blog: Airplane Engine Difficulties & Cars From 3D Printers

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Charles Murray
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Re: Smoking engine
Charles Murray   3/27/2013 5:32:09 PM
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I would do the same thing you did, CLMcDade. I would notify the flight attendant, as you did. And I would trust the co-pilot if he took the time to listen. If it were a small general aviation aircraft, and not a commercial aircraft, I might react differently.  

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smoking engine
Ann R. Thryft   3/27/2013 12:20:14 PM
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Chuck, I've always been a white knuckle flyer on small planes. I used to be one on larger commercial jets, but that's backed off. Sorry to hear about your sadistic and/or stupid pilot. I don't ever want to hear anything from a pilot except reassurance. If conditions were that bad, he shouldn't have flown.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Smoking engine, Oil leaks on engines
William K.   3/26/2013 9:39:38 PM
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I did have one flight with a steady stream of reddish hydraulic fluid running down the side of the engine housing the whole trip. But I figyred that at the very worst it would make it hard to get the landing gear down, except that it will deploy by gravity alone if they chant the correct incantation. But the real excitement was catching s very strong downdraft during a takeoff from the White Plains airport. They do a 180 degree turn, for noise abatement, early in the takeoff, and with the engines throttled way back for the turn, we hit a serious downflow and lost most of our altitude, such that I could see the folks on the ground very clearly. But then we recovered and regained our altitude, and the rest of the flight was uneventful. BUT the person next to me was as white as a ghost for quite a few minutes after the incident. It seems that I may have muttered something that un-nerved him while we were falling, but I can't recall what. 

Charles Murray
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Re: Smoking engine
Charles Murray   3/26/2013 8:40:37 PM
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I've become a white knuckle flyer on small planes, too, Ann. It started a few years ago (okay, it was 1988), flying in a four-seater from White Sulfur Springs, WV to Roanoke, VA. We were flying through thick fog, and the pilot spent the entire flight talking about flyers who crashed into mountain sides in that part of West Virginia. He admitted to being nervous about flying in those low-visibility conditions. Until that day, I always assumed that pilots didn't worry about things like that. We landed without incident, but my confidence has been shaken ever since.

CLMcDade
User Rank
Gold
squeaky plane ride
CLMcDade   3/26/2013 3:53:09 PM
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Rich,

Yes I actually did.  I was torn, but it was the last leg of three flights and I really wanted to get home. 

And the co-pilot's opinion held a lot of sway.  My dad was a pilot and he said a pilot's credo is "save the plane"... I mean, "passenger safety."  : )

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smoking engine
Ann R. Thryft   3/26/2013 2:07:13 PM
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Nadine, you are braver than I am. When I am forced to fly on small planes, I close my eyes and do deep yoga breathing as much as possible during the flight, and make sure not to sit near a window for the times when I have to open my eyes.

NadineJ
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Platinum
Re: Smoking engine
NadineJ   3/26/2013 2:01:51 PM
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I agree.  When I fly in small planes, especially outside of the US, it can be stressful if I listen too closely and think about it too much.  Personally, I end up with Doris Day in my head singing "Que Sera Sera" when the little noise turns into a big one.

So many things can go wrong in so many situations.

richnass
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Blogger
Re: Smoking engine
richnass   3/26/2013 1:59:55 PM
CMMcDade, you're leaving me in suspense. Did you stay on the flight?

CLMcDade
User Rank
Gold
Smoking engine
CLMcDade   3/26/2013 1:52:08 PM
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It's funny - the rapid prototyping aspect of the video seems to have captured most of the commentary, but it was Rich's reaction to being put back onto a plane with a smoking engine that caught my attention.

I have flown on commercial airplanes regularly since I was 6 years old.  On one flight about 8 years ago, we pulled away from the gate and started taxiing and the the landing gear started intermittently shuddering, moaning and squeaking. 

I rang for the flight attendant who came back, visibly annoyed.  I raised my concern and pointed out the offending noises.  She argued with me about being disruptive and loudly asked if I wanted to delay all the passengers by having us go back to the terminal.

The peer pressure worked against her as 5-6 other passengers chimed in that the noise was very unusual and worrisome.  The co-pilot came back, sat with us to listen to the noise, and gave us a description of what was happening down there to cause the noise.  He said that the crew had no concern about the noises, but to his credit, he gave us the option to turn back or go forward.

It was a strange position to be in, much like the one that Rich described. As engineers and designers, we notice things that others miss.

How often in our lives are we in the position that has someone else determining for us whether a questionable situation is safe or not ? How many times does their authority or opinion outweigh our judgment? And when should we let it? 

An airplane is a special case as the crews' judgment is the law, but when does one draw a line?  It's a tough position to be in...

 

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Planes and 3D printing
Ann R. Thryft   3/26/2013 1:00:45 PM
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Some additive manufacturing technologies, such as Sciaky's, are being used in real aircraft production environments, not for prototypes. For some OEMs, the ability to make parts this big in one pass at a reasonable rate of speed outweighs the value of making much smaller parts at a faster speed and bolting them together. Direct manufacturing is another term for actual parts, not prototypes. The wing box in this article
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=258652
is not a prototype: it's an actual part built for Lockheed. Sciaky says it's working with Lockheed to develop this technology further, and more direct-manufactured parts will be built for the F-35:
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/news/press-releases/2012/april/120412ae_lockheed-martin-sciaky-partner.html
http://www.sciaky.com/documents/Fabricator_May2012_GameChanger-Sciaky.pdf
And they're net/near-net parts, not those that create 30-50% waste.
For more, check out the links at the end of the DN article.



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