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Slideshow: Competitors Gear Up For DARPA Robot Challenge

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Cabe Atwell
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Re: IronMan effect
Cabe Atwell   5/18/2014 6:10:59 PM
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Virginia Tech's THOR is pretty impressive. I wonder what has become of it, as there isn't any more news about it. Did he join the likes of Johnny 5?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: IronMan effect
Ann R. Thryft   3/28/2013 2:20:49 PM
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I completely agree with you about human-like robots not being necessary for working in human-design spaces. I also think that goes for how human-like they must be in looks or operation: Some people like that similarity to humans, but some, like me, not only don't need it but find the uncanny valley effect horrific. OTOH, a lot of work has been done to help robots and humans communicate better so they can work together safely and productively. One of those things is designing robot hands to work more like ours for a number of reasons: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=260644

NadineJ
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Re: IronMan effect
NadineJ   3/28/2013 12:53:48 PM
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It's true that clear communication and comprehension are important.  Acronyms and colloquialisms can be confusing.

Back to the robots...I don't agree that robots' "perceptions and movements should be as human as possible" in order to work in a space designed for humans.  Observing a cat or dog in a new space demonstrates that non-humans can navigate spaces created for humans as well as, or better than, people.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: IronMan effect
Ann R. Thryft   3/28/2013 11:35:43 AM
I find that using clear, widely-understood meanings for terms makes written, non-duplex communication much easier (spoken, full-duplex communication, like in a phone or F2F conversation, is of course usually a lot clearer since multiple, instant iterations are possible when needed). I also find that precision and accuracy are important in all communications.



NadineJ
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Re: IronMan effect
NadineJ   3/27/2013 2:54:38 PM
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I guess working in a creative enviornment leads to a 'creative' writing style.  I do lean towards the vernacular.  In my comments bio = human.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: IronMan effect
Ann R. Thryft   3/27/2013 2:43:10 PM
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Nadine, thanks for the comment. I interpreted, "At the end of the day, all robots are bio-mimics.  Humans included." to mean what its grammar says, which is that humans are bio-mimics. It's hard to interpret that in some other way. In any case, I do agree about more precise writing and close reading.

NadineJ
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Re: IronMan effect
NadineJ   3/26/2013 11:18:38 PM
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Ann-it was a statement.  Sorry things aren't clear but I didn't say that humans are biomimics.  Maybe more precise writing and close reading would help.

It's good to stand behind what you write.  I do the same.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: IronMan effect
Ann R. Thryft   3/26/2013 1:51:14 PM
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Nadine, yes I was responding to your comment. I agree that biomimicry doesn't exclude humans: that seems obvious. I've studied biomimicry in robotics, and saying all robots are biomimics isn't accurate in that area, although it may be elsewhere. But it's such a general statement that I don't see its usefulness from robotics engineering standpoint. And saying humans are biomimics doesn't make sense to me at all, since we are biological systems. In any case, my comments specifically about biomimicry in robotics stand.

NadineJ
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Re: IronMan effect
NadineJ   3/26/2013 1:42:23 PM
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Ann-I'm not sure if you're replying directly to my comment

"At the end of the day, all robots are bio-mimics.  Humans included."

To clarify, when I say that all robots are bio-mimics, I am referring to biomimicry in it's truest sense.  I've studied it extensively while designing children's products.

The line "Humans included" is to recognize that biomimicry doesn't just include insects and sea creatures.  Human beings are part of the biosphere and models for biomimicry.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: IronMan effect
Ann R. Thryft   3/26/2013 12:11:51 PM
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Biomimicry in robotics, at least, doesn't mean generally resembling; it means something very specific. It refers to studying particular biological systems to see how they work, and translating their neurological, muscular, skeletal, etc systems--structures and/or functions-- into mechanical and/or electronic analogs. This is much more recent than the fundamental research type of approach that goes more like: what would happen if we made a robot with three legs vs six and used XYZ actuation types. Boston Dynamics, for example, was one of the very early pioneers in patterning robots after specific animals.

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