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Slideshow: Robotic Snakes & Worms Get Under Your Skin
2/5/2013

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The Slim Slime Robot from the Tokyo Institute of Technology's Hirose Fukushima Lab is a pneumatically driven active cord mechanism. It is used to inspect pipes in chemical laboratories or nuclear plants, detect unexploded mines, and help first responders find victims in collapsed buildings. A series of six connected modules are driven by pneumatic actuators. Compressed air is forced from the main tube of each module into that module's bellows, or flexible pneumatic actuators, which are located along the main tube's length. The Slim Slime can creep like a snake, make pivoting turns, roll laterally, and move with a pedal-like motion that emulates snails and limpets. Its total length is 730-1,120mm (28.7-44 inches). It weighs 12kg (26.4 pounds), and its top speed is about 60mm (2.36 inches) per second. (Source: Hirose Fukushima Lab)
The Slim Slime Robot from the Tokyo Institute of Technology's Hirose Fukushima Lab is a pneumatically driven active cord mechanism. It is used to inspect pipes in chemical laboratories or nuclear plants, detect unexploded mines, and help first responders find victims in collapsed buildings. A series of six connected modules are driven by pneumatic actuators. Compressed air is forced from the main tube of each module into that module's bellows, or flexible pneumatic actuators, which are located along the main tube's length. The Slim Slime can creep like a snake, make pivoting turns, roll laterally, and move with a pedal-like motion that emulates snails and limpets. Its total length is 730-1,120mm (28.7-44 inches). It weighs 12kg (26.4 pounds),
and its top speed is about 60mm (2.36 inches) per second.
(Source: Hirose Fukushima Lab)

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Nancy Golden
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Fascinating
Nancy Golden   2/5/2013 12:21:02 PM
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That was a fascinating slideshow - I really like the idea of using robotic snakes for dangerous or hard to reach applications. I will need to show hubby Roboboa (slide 10). He is thinking about using a PIC microcontroller and designing a rattlesnake for one of our portable trail obstacles for horses, that rattles and moves when a horse approaches - Roboboa looks like a lot of fun with some cool possibilities. I would just make sure and introduce my horse to him from the ground first!

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
Robotic Snakes & Worms
apresher   2/5/2013 10:05:55 AM
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Ann,  Definitely a unique collection of designs, and they can definitely get under your skin if you're not a fan of snakes in general.  Thanks for the unique slideshow. 

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