HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog

The Work Day of the Future

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/3  >  >>
NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
just short of interesting
NadineJ   11/15/2012 11:57:47 AM
This is a nice exercise in re-designing the workplace.  Variations on cubicles.

I would have liked to see what students came up with when really thinking about how the actual work day would change.  Not just, the work space.

40 years ago, we thought there would be more leisure time by 2012.  What happened was that work became portable.  Americans especially work more than ever before with less leisure time.  There's no cubicle re-design that could have predicted that.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: just short of interesting
Cabe Atwell   11/15/2012 4:55:50 PM
NO RATINGS
It depends on where you are located in the world. The growing population with still need goods manufactured cheaply, food grown, services met. In other words, 2030 being only 17 years away might not be much different than now. Countless people slaving in factories in China/India/poorer countries, while the rest of the world works directly or indirectly for the service industry.

As I have worked in offices and locations that seemed not to have evolved past the 1970s, around 50 years later, I don't see much of a change coming.

I do believe that the BYOD, bring your own device, trend in the workplace today will change how much we all are tied to our various jobs. As an engineer, I design and perform test, which I can do anywhere. There have been plenty of times where I did my work remotely, I tacked more work for sure this way. Since higher-ups want to keep tabs on what their employees are doing, the demand for them to be present during work hours will still remain.

 

For perspective; I know a person who worked for a company that had a large manufacturing side. Over the time I was there, they moved those jobs outside the company (Some inside and outside the USA). Then it was just us engineers. Then those departments were consolidated and partially replaced with overseas engineers (India). This was over the course of a few years. All parties involved, the work place change depended on where you were located.

C

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: just short of interesting
Charles Murray   11/15/2012 5:58:03 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point about portability, NadineJ. If the trend toward portability continues, I wonder what percentage of employees will work at home, and what effect that will have on huge business centers, such as downtown New York City or Chicago.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Work moves to the home
Rob Spiegel   11/15/2012 8:23:14 PM
NO RATINGS
Nice article, Lauren. I agree with Chuck that work is likely to move more and more into the home. Work from home has environmental advantages as well as time advantages, both of which will probably increase in importance. IT tools will probably move toward touch screens and away from the keyboard. Except for journalists, of course, who will probably stay tied to the keyboard.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Re: just short of interesting
Tim   11/15/2012 8:23:20 PM
NO RATINGS
20 years ago, my high school careers teacher was still pushing that in the future that the leisure industry would be high dollars.  She pushed Hotel Management over Engineering to most students.  With the downturn in the economy and reduction of leisure spending, I wonder if she feels a little guilty.

As for the workplace 20 years from now, thing are so mobile now that there is less and less reason for central computing or main offices.  There may be a resurgence of the home office that employers would allow designers to work at home while being at work.

Droid
User Rank
Platinum
All about interactions
Droid   11/16/2012 9:53:43 AM
Fascinating anticipation of the future work environement.  The future likely holds a humorous view of this privacy tent concept.

I believe the future work place will be even more focused on human interactions.  Virtual meetings, holographic presentations.  All around technology which makes our physical location irrelevant..

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
The work day of the future
Dave Palmer   11/16/2012 10:44:10 AM
NO RATINGS
Based on current trends, I expect than in 2030, the work day will be 23.5 hours long, and each company will have exactly one engineering employee, who, in addition to design, will also be responsible for prototyping, testing, manufacturing, equipment maintenance, quality assurance, purchasing, sales, marketing, accounting, human resources, and food service.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: just short of interesting
Ann R. Thryft   11/16/2012 11:45:40 AM
NO RATINGS
I also heard all those predictions about more leisure time. Then in the 1980s, as one of the first people I knew with a home office, I heard predictions about everyone working from home. It has not happened in the volumes predicted, no matter how portable our jobs can be. If it had, there'd be a big rush to the suburbs, instead of to the cities.

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Restrictions
Battar   11/16/2012 2:04:14 PM
NO RATINGS
Comparing my workplace now with 20 years ago, I think the biggest difference is the increase in the number of handicaps that restrict us. 20 years ago I could solder with lead, my PSU's could put out more EMI and no-one noticed, I could say good morning to a female co-worker without being accused of sexual harrasment, and there were less stuffed suits in the EU looking for more substances to ban and tweaking the compliance standards.  in 20 years I'll probably have access to more information than I can handle, and I'll still be commenting on Design News in my lesuire time, not my work hours.

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Restrictions
GTOlover   11/16/2012 4:34:26 PM
NO RATINGS
True, and micromanaging free speech such that you will limit your comments on Design News.

Page 1/3  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs
Here's a variety of views into the complex production processes at Santa's factory. Happy Holidays!
The Beam Store from Suitable Technologies is managed by remote workers from places as diverse as New York and Sydney, Australia. Employees attend to store visitors through Beam Smart Presence Systems (SPSs) from the company. The systems combine mobility and video conferencing and allow people to communicate directly from a remote location via a screen as well as move around as if they are actually in the room.
Thanks to 3D printing, some custom-made prosthetic limbs, and a Lego set, one lucky dog and a tortoise has learned new tricks.
With Radio Shack on the ropes, let's take a memory trip through the highlights of Radio Shack products.
Computer security firm Norton has partnered with clothing company Betaband on a pair of jeans that will keep your RFID-tagged credit cards and documents safe from wireless theft.
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service