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Biosynthetic Micro-Robot Will Combine Cells, Electronics

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mrdon
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Biosynthetic Micro-Robot applications
mrdon   10/22/2012 12:12:03 PM
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Hi Ann, Biosynthetic Micro-Robot research seems quite interesting based on your article. It's truly fascinating when electronics and biology are integrated to create these wonderful autonomous cells for the benefit it aiding the human body, for example drug delivery. The application of pollutants monitoring is quite interesting because of the micron level being engaged with these small biosynthetic machines. Who knows, allergies may become a thing of the past if such micro-machines can be used to eliminate their nose reactive bacteria. Great article as always Ann!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Biosynthetic Micro-Robot applications
Ann R. Thryft   10/22/2012 12:48:57 PM
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Thanks, mrdon. Allergies, eh? I hadn't thought of that in re this robot and drug delivery. Sounds like a great idea!--I suffer from them year-round. Right now, it's mold season in the redwoods, last week it was still dust and pollen season.

mrdon
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Re: Biosynthetic Micro-Robot applications
mrdon   10/22/2012 1:06:00 PM
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Hi Ann, Mold is a pesky little bacteria that can use some biosynthetic micro-robot cleansing. Also, cancer researchers may be able to put these robots to good use as well.

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Biosynthetic Micro-Robot applications
Beth Stackpole   10/22/2012 2:23:22 PM
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Sounds like some pretty radical foundational technology that could have huge impact across a wide variety of applications. The biomickry stuff you've been writing about is pretty amazing. But I have to ask: What is a sea lamprey?

mrdon
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Re: Biosynthetic Micro-Robot applications
mrdon   10/22/2012 2:32:16 PM
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Hi Beth, A sea lamprey looks an eel that attaches to fish with a suction mouth embedded with razor sharp teeth. Here's a wikipedia link with addtional information about them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_lamprey

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Biosynthetic Micro-Robot applications
Ann R. Thryft   10/22/2012 3:52:16 PM
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Good description, mrdon. Beth, you might think of a sea lamprey as an eel-like saltwater piranha.

mrdon
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Re: Biosynthetic Micro-Robot applications
mrdon   10/23/2012 12:49:46 AM
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Hi Ann, Your description of an eel like saltwater piranha is truly a good way of defining a sea lamprey.

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Biosynthetic Micro-Robot applications
Beth Stackpole   10/23/2012 7:52:09 AM
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Ok. Thanks for clarifying. Either of you have any insight as to why an eel-like piranha lends itself to this kind of cell-to-cell communication?

mrdon
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Re: Biosynthetic Micro-Robot applications
mrdon   10/23/2012 9:37:28 AM
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Hi Beth, No sure about the cell to cell communication but I envision the movement of the biosynthetic micro-robot to be that of the sea lamprey which is a long side to side propulsion of travel. Just guessing!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Biosynthetic Micro-Robot applications
Ann R. Thryft   10/23/2012 12:15:06 PM
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Beth, mrdon is right: the lamprey was chosen for its swimming motions that the robot will emulate. Cell-to-cell communication is a project goal, and not particularly related to the choice of animal model.

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