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Slideshow: Evolution of the Robotic Canadarm

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Scott Orlosky
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Re: Size and scale pretty incredible
Scott Orlosky   10/20/2012 8:27:09 PM
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Ann.  Thanks for a great series of photos.  Even with all the great engineering that went into this project, nothing beats the visual impact of seeing it in action in space. 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Memories
Ann R. Thryft   10/18/2012 12:25:06 PM
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Thanks, notarboca. I, too, am impressed at the longevity of this project and its continuously innovative technologies.

notarboca
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Re: Memories
notarboca   10/17/2012 11:25:41 PM
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Ann, thanks for a great slideshow.  It is both amazing and a tribute to all the engineers and technicians that brought this project to fruition.  A 30 year run of the basic arm and improvements made during the long deployment make this an exceptional feat.  I'm sure the new NGC will be equally impressive.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Bigger than I imagined
Ann R. Thryft   10/17/2012 5:08:25 PM
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Chuck, I know what you mean. 15 meters is just short of 50 feet. This thing has to grapple with satellites and its predecessor, Canadarm 2 (weighing 2 tons), docked the space shuttle.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Memories
Ann R. Thryft   10/17/2012 5:02:23 PM
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Thanks, Lou, just wondered. McD-D had its fingers in a lot of pies in many places back when.

Charles Murray
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Bigger than I imagined
Charles Murray   10/17/2012 5:00:13 PM
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Although I saw the description of the 15m arm, the real size of it didn't hit me until I arrived at slide 5. The size of this thing is stunning.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Memories
Ann R. Thryft   10/17/2012 12:05:15 PM
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Rob, I haven't seen any robotics research coming from Canada except for the Canadarm. OTOH, the Canadarm has been a massive, 30-year project commanding a lot of resources and many, many different technologies. It's also been vital to the functioning of both the shuttle and the space station.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: End Effector
Ann R. Thryft   10/17/2012 12:02:59 PM
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TJ, the blue supports in the first photo weren't identified. I would think that the answer to your question about the end effector's history is available on the web. The Canadian Space Agency's website is pretty extensive, and there's also this source:
http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com

naperlou
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Re: Memories
naperlou   10/17/2012 11:42:53 AM
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Ann, if you mean Mcdonnel Douglas, then the answer is no.  One thing that was nice at the MacDonald Dettwiler facility in Vancouver was that Friday's were beer days.  At the end of the day everyone would get together in the cafeteria and the beer cooler would be unlocked.  There was a great selection of good Canadian beers and we would all have two or three and socialize.  It was a lot of fun.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Memories
Rob Spiegel   10/16/2012 10:41:32 PM
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Nice slide show, Ann. Since you have covered tons of stories regarding robotics, I'm curious as to how Canada stacks up against the robotics that are getting developed here in the U.S., particularly by the military. Is Canada a contender?

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