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Slideshow: Robots in Space
10/2/2012

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Justin is a humanoid robot being developed by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) for tasks that are too dangerous for humans, such as repairing orbiting satellites. Like humanoid robots designed for home use, humanoid space robots must be dexterous, mobile, and capable of carrying out tasks that require complex manipulation of tools and objects. They also need to be intelligent and have the ability to undertake manipulations that involve the use of both hands. Justin has compliant-controlled lightweight arms and four fingers on each of its two hands. It's remotely operated by a human, and its mobile platform allows it to operate autonomously at longer ranges. The platform has individually movable, spring-born wheels to match the robot's upper body movements during manipulation tasks. Also contributing to the robot's autonomy are photonic mixer device (PMD) sensors and cameras that allow it to make 3D reconstructions of its environment. Eventually, Justin will be mounted on its own satellite.   (Source: German Aerospace Center)
Justin is a humanoid robot being developed by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) for tasks that are too dangerous for humans, such as repairing orbiting satellites. Like humanoid robots designed for home use, humanoid space robots must be dexterous, mobile, and capable of carrying out tasks that require complex manipulation of tools and objects. They also need to be intelligent and have the ability to undertake manipulations that involve the use of both hands. Justin has compliant-controlled lightweight arms and four fingers on each of its two hands. It's remotely operated by a human, and its mobile platform allows it to operate autonomously at longer ranges. The platform has individually movable, spring-born wheels to match the robot's upper body movements during manipulation tasks. Also contributing to the robot's autonomy are photonic mixer device (PMD) sensors and cameras that allow it to make 3D reconstructions of its environment. Eventually, Justin will be mounted on its own satellite.
(Source: German Aerospace Center)

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Rob Spiegel
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Re: Cast of robot characters
Rob Spiegel   10/2/2012 11:10:41 AM
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Great slideshow, Ann. Loved the fact that most of the robots were not humanoid. Yet another example of the wide range of robotic equipment.

naperlou
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Re: Cast of robot characters
naperlou   10/2/2012 11:05:54 AM
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Beth and Ann, that is a motley crew.  Actually the NASA robot looks a little like the bounty hunter from Star Wars, doesn't it?  I wonder that the Curiosity rover was not pictured.  It seems to be one of the most complex yet.

Beth Stackpole
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Cast of robot characters
Beth Stackpole   10/2/2012 7:53:24 AM
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Nice slide show, Ann. Certainly depicts the wide range of robots, some humanoid and some mimicking insects and animals, that are an on-going part of the space program. It's interesting that so much of what you see in this slide show that was once only the domain of government-backed space programs is now filtering down into more mainstream applications.

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