HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog

Case Study: Variable Frequency Drives Cut Energy Costs

< Previous Page 2 / 4 Next >
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
apresher
User Rank
Blogger
VFDs
apresher   4/8/2012 9:42:14 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the comment, Jack. There definitely is a need for more education on energy saving possibilities with VFDs, although I think the suppliers are trying to be effective in this area. There are also different types of incentives to help accelerate and finance ROI.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Variable Frequency Drives
Jack Rupert, PE   4/8/2012 6:45:51 PM
NO RATINGS
You're absolutely right, apresher.  VFD's have a whole range of applications where they signficantly improve efficiency.  I think the vendors need to be more proactive in selling these features and showing the cost savings.

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
Variable Frequency Drives
apresher   4/6/2012 11:11:38 AM
NO RATINGS
Good article.  Certainly it's well-known that variable frequency drives will save on energy costs if properly applied. Vendors provide both assistance and calculator applications to help identify and cost justify these newer systems.  But the potential savings also go beyond traditional pump and fan applications to other areas such as regen, power factor and common bus applications. Some companies seems determined to seek out savings while others are much less aggressive in investing the engineering it takes to reduce energy costs.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Variable frequency drives cut energy costs.
William K.   4/4/2012 10:53:38 AM
NO RATINGS
IT should not be any surprise that using a VFD to reduce the power applied to any process that requires less than the maximum capability of a prime mover will reduce energy consumption and power waste. 

Any process that does not need full power constantly should be examined as a candidate for a VFD, although in some situations it may not make economic sense. Variable energy input control can be extended to other areas as well. In pneumatic systems, as an example, all of the energynused pushing air through undersized piping to provide adequate flow is wasted. The fastest way to see if that is happening is to observe the cylinder pressure and see if it continues to rise after the cylinder stroke is completed. The same applies to hydraulic systems and cylinders. An added advantage is that larger piping can provide faster cycle time, usually without any increased energy consumption. OF course, in hydraulic systems a VFD can provide for inceased pump delivery only during the periods when high flow is required, which can result in a very large improvement in overall system efficiency, and as a free bonus it can reduce system cooling requirements quite a bit. In fact, in at least one application the use of a VFD for hydraulic pumps reduced power consumption by more than 50%, with no compromise in performance at all.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Great Solution
naperlou   4/3/2012 9:24:49 AM
NO RATINGS
This is another great example of industry becoming more efficient.  As the article points out, industry uses a third of the energy used in the US.  The opportunity to improve efficiency in these areas is great, and this opportunity comes mostly from better engineering.  There is a lot of talk about green computing, but this is a much better area to concentrate on.  The payback is greater.

Partner Zone
More Blogs
From wearables to design changes to rumors of a car, Apple has multiple things cooking up in its kitchen. Here are six possibilities from Apple next week, with likely more than one coming to light.
The key to the success of alt energy is advanced automation, which is still relatively new to the energy scene.
New fastening and joining methods are making it possible to join multiple materials and thinner sheets in consumer and medical portable electronics, as well as automotive and aviation systems.
An upcoming Digi-Key Continuing Education Center class on designing motor control using MCUs and FPGAs will show you how to choose the best hardware and tools to speed up your development time.
It won't be too much longer and hardware design, as we used to know it, will be remembered alongside the slide rule and the Karnaugh map. You will need to move beyond those familiar bits and bytes into the new world of software centric design.
Design News Webinar Series
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Mar 9 - 13, Implementing Motor Control Designs with MCUs and FPGAs: An Introduction and Update
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service