HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog
Does Machine Vision Need 10-Gigabit Ethernet?
12/12/2011

A GigE Vision machine vision network can be upgraded to 10GigE speeds and still deploy Camera Link cameras  using devices such as this iPORT CL-Ten transmitter, with two Camera Link ports and a 10GigE port.
 Source: Pleora Technologies
A GigE Vision machine vision network can be upgraded to 10GigE speeds and still deploy Camera Link cameras
using devices such as this iPORT CL-Ten transmitter, with two Camera Link ports and a 10GigE port.
Source: Pleora Technologies

Return to Article

View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Higher
Beth Stackpole   12/12/2011 7:50:38 AM
NO RATINGS
It would seem that with all the emerging high-bandwidth applications in medical, military and other segments, 10-Gigabit would be a natural upgrade path to get the higher performance so the machine vision infrastructure can keep up. What is the downside to going with 10-Gigabit Ethernet offerings? Higher price?

John.Phillips
User Rank
Iron
Re: Higher
John.Phillips   12/12/2011 9:33:04 AM
NO RATINGS
Hi Beth,

What you'll find in these types of systems is that if the video needs to be transmitted only a short distance, from maybe 1-2 cameras, directly to a PC and no further, that 10 GigE might not be the right technology, cost-wise.

But most high-value systems aren't like that - either they have a more than half-a-dozen cameras (especially web inspection systems), they need to distribute imagery to multiple endpoints (for example, for distributed processing and analysis), the endpoints need to be far away from the inspection areas (especially in dirty environments like steel or textile inspection), or some combination of the above.

In any of those cases, 10 GigE can bring a cost savings, especially when you subtract out the cost of framegrabbers and/or expensive cabling and repeaters.

JP

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Higher
Beth Stackpole   12/12/2011 10:05:59 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for clarifying, John. So what you're saying is that for the bulk of applications where there are multiple cameras that need to distribute images to multiple end points, 10GigE can make a big difference. For the fewer applications where there is closer proximity, it could be overkill from a price standpoint.

John.Phillips
User Rank
Iron
Re: Higher
John.Phillips   12/12/2011 10:27:24 AM
NO RATINGS
Even in cases where you have only 1 of the 2 (multiple cameras or multi-point distribution), you can have a significant cost savings.  Camera Link medium cameras are plentiful in the market, well-understood, and come in a variety of performance classes.  But they suffer from a costly interface - cables, repeaters, and frame grabbers aren't inexpensive.  It's beneficial to convert the CL interface into something like 10 GigE.

Camera manufacturers are starting to take a look at offering the same camera (same sensor, same electronics), but with a 10 GigE interface built right in.

But yes, if you have 1-2 cameras that need to be connected to a PC a pace away, then there are other alternatives.  But medical, military, and high-value quality inspection applications don't tend to fit this mold.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Higher
Ann R. Thryft   12/12/2011 12:23:26 PM
NO RATINGS

Beth, good question. Many say there aren't really any downsides, and higher price is definitely not one of them. Ethernet's ubiquity throughout the enterprise means that most components--network interface cards, cables--are generally quite low cost. Some critics say that although GigE takes away the frame grabber (image capture card) it puts back in the NIC (network interface card). Although this is technically true, NICs cost a lot less than frame grabbers.To date, the main initial concerns about using GigE as a backbone for real-time networks such as high-speed vision requires have been regarding CPU loading and latency. This basically means a potential source of slowing down data transfers. Enthusiasts say that CPU loading has been fixed with filters and drivers, and latency has turned out not to be a problem in 1 Gbps GigE networks. Whether this will all translate well to an order of magnitude speed increase is not yet known.


Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Higher
Ann R. Thryft   12/12/2011 12:26:34 PM
NO RATINGS

John, thanks for the detailed response.

Beth, a machine vision system with multiple cameras is served well by any speed of GigE backbone and its multipoint-to-multipoint capabilities. Whether you need to ratchet that up to 10 GigE depends on the nature of the data and/or the speed of the transfer.


williamlweaver
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Higher
williamlweaver   12/12/2011 1:13:58 PM
NO RATINGS
Looks like we are again bumping up against the limits of informatics. At some point it stops being a question of how fast and how much data can be transferred, and becomes a question of where do we store it and how quickly can we analyze it. Advances in cognitive algorithms are concerned with "attention" -- noticing anomalies in a product inspection line or movement in a normally still scene. We have a great interplay between the development of hardware and software solutions. With GigE 2.0, it looks like its software's turn to make a move. 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Higher
Charles Murray   12/12/2011 10:06:09 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann: Lately you've been writing about 3D machine vision systems. Does 10-Gbit Ethernet makes more sense for 3D applications?

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Higher
Alexander Wolfe   12/13/2011 8:16:00 AM
NO RATINGS
Good point, Bill, and I think the challenge here will be on manufacturing and automation engineers to work with their software counterparts to create what I'd call predictive diagnostic and QC systems, which can make use of that data (not just more data for data's sake, which can't be analyzed, like you say). The objective would be almost an artificial intellgence-like program, or, more properly, software that over time builds up a database of patterns from which it can analyze and predict future outcomes, such as potential near-term failures as well as tweaks to improve/maintain production quality.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Does Machine vision need?
William K.   12/13/2011 12:17:28 PM
NO RATINGS
Just because some are doing it does not mean that every application needs it.

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs
A soundproofing invention called Acoustiblok recently won a television challenge to silence an air horn with only a fraction of an inch of polymer material.
Robots came into their own in the 1970s. Gone were the low-budget black-and-white B movies. Now robots roamed in full-color feature films with A-list actors.
Major global metropolitan areas are implementing a vast number of technology, energy, transportation, and Internet projects to make the metropolis a friendlier, greener, safer, and more sustainable place to be.
Here’s a look at robots depicted in movies and on TV during the 1950s and 1960s. We tried to collect the classics here, omitting the scores of forgettable B movies such as Santa Claus Conquers the Martians and Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine. Stay tuned for slideshows of robot stars from later decades.
A scientist at the University of Pittsburgh has achieved a breakthrough in the quest to create artificial cartilage with human cells for treatment of degenerative joint disease.
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Jul 21 - 25, Design Products With Bluetooth Low Energy
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service