HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog

Top 5 Robotics Trends of 2011

NO RATINGS
1 saves
Page 1 / 3 Next >
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/4  >  >>
Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Tracking luggage?
Alexander Wolfe   12/9/2011 11:33:02 AM
NO RATINGS
There definitely is a marketing impediment to consumer robot uptake, along the lines of "What can these things actually do?" With the Roomba, it's not clear that this can vacuum your floors better than a normal vacuum. With Honda's Asimo, it's a curiousity. With the Japanese humanoid robots, well, the less said the better. I think it's going to take a robotics industry Steve Jobs to "create" a need for these things. Maybe Heather Knight is that person.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Tracking luggage?
Charles Murray   12/8/2011 8:54:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, I'm seeing more commercials for home robots. For example, Swiffer is running a commercial for a robot that wipes your floors with a cleaning cloth. Are we actually seeing more of these? 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Tracking luggage?
Rob Spiegel   12/8/2011 1:04:40 PM
NO RATINGS
I'd love to see how the robots pull luggage. Since luggage comes is so many shapes it seem the robot would have to be very flexible. There there's the question of whether the robot might damage the luggage. Also, I would imagine the robot would need to identify the bags. Perhaps they use RFID so that line-of-sight is not a problem.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Tracking luggage?
Ann R. Thryft   12/8/2011 12:30:17 PM
NO RATINGS

Thanks, Rob. Right now, we may all have to go to the Amsterdam airport if we want our luggage tracked correctly! Kidding aside, I, too, was surprised, in fact dumfounded, that such an enormous system works at all, regardless of it's underpinnings. And I was even more surprised that it's done with robotics. Part of the fun in investigating this area is that the technology is much more advanced than I realized. I don't think we're quite yet to the point of a War with the Machines (Terminator? Frank Herbert? Dan Simmons' AI net?), but progress in robotics is certainly proceeding apace.

 


Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bifurcation?
Ann R. Thryft   12/8/2011 12:29:35 PM
NO RATINGS

The crossover I had in mind was not making industrial robots cuter or more human-looking--and I agree, Beth, a cute-looking ET-like prison guard sounds like a very scary idea.

What I do think possible is that some of the movement emulation work described in #5 could be used to influence how consumer robots move, making them even more human, and could also be used in surgical robots (larger than the one described in this article), which require extraordinary precision (if it's not already). At the same time, some work like this (motion emulation) may have already been done in surgical robots which might then translate back insto consumer robots.


Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Progress
Alexander Wolfe   12/8/2011 10:43:12 AM
NO RATINGS
The canonical example of robots run amok (that sounds like a title for a Star Trek episode) was what happened at GM under Roger Smith when they were first implemented. Of course, that's a period in the U.S. auto industry that everyone would rather forget (paging Chevy Vega). As you say, jhankwitz, things have thankfully progressed a great deal. The interesting development now is that we have solid tech progress simultaneously on TWO robotics fronts: industrial, which is relatively mature, and the newer consumer oriented robotics, like Roomba and the Japanese attempts to create humanoid-looking machines (to which I say, ick).

 

jhankwitz
User Rank
Platinum
Progress
jhankwitz   12/8/2011 9:24:19 AM
NO RATINGS
I was involve with ASEA Robotics way back in the late 70's.  Their primary focus was getting auto manufacturers up and running with them.  Their biggest problem was that the robots demanded far less variation between parts being assembled, which got them involved with advancing vision technology to compensate for some variation.  It's amazing how this industry has expanded and progressed over the years.

phonesystems
User Rank
Iron
Robotics Trends
phonesystems   12/8/2011 6:29:29 AM
NO RATINGS
There is truly a big explosion of experimentation in technology and everybody is putting whole of there knowledge and creativity in making some best Robots.

Efm

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bifurcation?
Charles Murray   12/7/2011 10:53:59 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, I think there is a small amount of crossover starting to happen. One example: The VGo robot, from VGo Communications, which plays a mildly human role but does not have any human attributes. VGo Communications said that they deliberately used a non-human form, so it "wouldn't be intimidating."

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Tracking luggage?
Rob Spiegel   12/7/2011 3:27:16 PM
NO RATINGS
Nice trend piece, Ann. I was little surprised to see luggage tracking on the list. It makes sense simply because of the complexity. I'd love to see how automatic luggage tracking is improving the process of keeping travelers moving parallel to their bags.

<<  <  Page 3/4  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs
With major product releases coming from big names like Sony, Microsoft, and Samsung, and big investments by companies like Facebook, 2015 could be the year that virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) finally pop. Here's take a look back at some of the technologies that got us here (for better and worse).
Good engineering designs are those that work in the real world; bad designs are those that donít. If we agree to set our egos aside and let the real world be our guide, we can resolve nearly any disagreement.
The Industrial Internet of Things is bringing a previously reluctant process industry into the wireless fold. The ability to connect smart sensors to the Internet has spiked the demand for wireless devices in process manufacturing, according to the new study from ARC Advisory Group.
Enterprising Tesla Model S owner Steve Sasman seems to have figured out a way of recouping some of the cost on his car by renting the trunk out on AirBnB, the room/house rental website.
Everyone has had the experience of trying to scrape the last of the peanut butter or mayonnaise from the bottom of a glass jar without getting your hand sticky. Inventor Ron Jidmar thinks he has a solution to all of that nonsense with a flexible jar design that can be squeezed with one hand to lift contents from the bottom to the top of a jar or container, leaving the other hand free to scoop the contents out cleanly.
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Jan 26 - 30, IPv6 for Micros Ė Hands-On
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Stratasys
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service