HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog

Machine Vision Advances Showcased at Stuttgart Conference

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Coming full circle
Beth Stackpole   11/15/2011 6:33:50 AM
NO RATINGS
Interesting that technology that started out in medical equipment and made its way to manufacturing is now being tapped to improve the quality of manufacturing that equipment. Another great example of how technology travels full circle. Given the amount of imaging that's utilized in medical equipment, it stands to reason there's much more opportunity to apply machine vision equipment for garnering efficiencies and working out quality kinks on the production floor.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Robust machine vision
Alexander Wolfe   11/15/2011 7:23:38 AM
NO RATINGS
I visited a production line yesterday at a plant that does a lot of precision assembly using adhesives and laminates, and machine vision is utilized heavily to ensure quality (check tolerances, etc.) I was particularly struck by how robust the MV equipment has to be to handle the production rate, temp, vibration, etc. A tall order for such precision equipment.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Robust machine vision
Ann R. Thryft   11/15/2011 2:01:01 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, machine vision is extremely rugged hardware compared to even consumer equipment, which is one of several reasons it's always been a lot more expensive. That's started to change recently with the use of more open platforms, but it's still got to be highly durable.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Coming full circle
Charles Murray   11/15/2011 2:07:27 PM
NO RATINGS
It makes sense that medical would be a great growth area for this technology, given the fact that handling is an issue for many medical parts. With cost coming down and electronic performance rising, though, it's natural that it would find new applications in a variety of other industries, such as aerospace and defense.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Robust machine vision
Tim   11/15/2011 9:52:41 PM
NO RATINGS
Machine vision has come a long way in both quality and price.  With off the shelf components and Windows based software, the abiilty to include vision on most products as a quality check has never been more accessible.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Coming full circle
Ann R. Thryft   11/16/2011 3:22:43 PM
NO RATINGS
Although several of the vision technologies mentioned in the article started in the medical industry, the origin of machine vision in inspection began in electronics. As the electronics content in other industries has risen, the need for more and better inspection has gone up. That's also happened as the need for higher quality of the end product has risen, even when electronics aren't a major part of the end product, such as consumer food containers.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Robust machine vision
Ann R. Thryft   11/22/2011 12:21:31 PM
NO RATINGS

Machine vision is becoming so ubiquitous in so many different types of products that a new organization, the Embedded Vision Alliance, formed recently to help unite some of these far-flung industries and development silos:

http://www.embedded-vision.com/

Unlike previous vision trade associations, it's not limited either by industry or geography.


vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
Machine vision in medical domain
vimalkumarp   11/26/2011 12:50:06 AM
NO RATINGS
This is an interesting turnaround. Imagine the possibilities of machine vision

being integrated with surgical robots ..! Karel Čapek will be happy had he been alive...!

vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
off the shelf machine vision
vimalkumarp   11/26/2011 12:52:24 AM
NO RATINGS
Off the shelf components like NI modules for machine vision reduces time to develop machne vision considerbly for modern applications . This is a domain that will make waves in healthcare applications

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Machine vision in medical domain
Ann R. Thryft   11/28/2011 12:32:46 PM
NO RATINGS

The HeartLander robot prototype, which DN covered,

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=233973

might be a prime candidate for integrated machine vision. The vision components would have to be extremely small to fit on a heart-crawling robot like this one, but cameras are getting tinier all the time. And the integration of machine vision with robots is definitely a growing trend on the factory floor. Seeing them in surgery may not be far behind.


Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs
The engineers and inventors of the post WWII period turned their attention to advancements in electronics, communication, and entertainment. Breakthrough inventions range from LEGOs and computer gaming to the integrated circuit and Ethernet -- a range of advancements that have little in common except they changed our lives.
Industrial equipment can be improved by pushing big data from operations into the design process.
Neil Fromer is the executive director of the Resnick Institute, a program for energy and sustainability at the California Institute of Technology, working to develop new ideas and research technologies related to providing a sustainable future. He spoke to us about the severity of the current drought in California and how solar energy can help prevent such situations in the future.
CAD trends survey shows steep growth in 3D printing, cloud services, PLM, and simulation.
From home enthusiasts to workers on the manufacturing floor, everyone's imagination is captured by the potential of 3D printing. Prototyping, spare parts creation, art delivery, human organ creation, and even mass product production are all being targeted as current and potential uses for the technology.
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
5/7/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
May 4 - 8, Designing Low Power Systems using Battery and Energy Harvesting Energy Sources
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Proto Labs
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service