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Video: This Isn't Your Mother's Pasta
9/19/2012

A roomful of the Chef Cui noodle-slicing robots invented by Cui Runquan to perform the arduous and repetitive task of slicing noodles in restaurants. The robots use movements similar to a windshield wiper to slice noodles rapidly with one hand from dough held in the other. (Source: Zoominuk)
A roomful of the Chef Cui noodle-slicing robots invented by Cui Runquan to perform the arduous and repetitive task of slicing noodles in restaurants. The robots use movements similar to a windshield wiper to slice noodles rapidly with one hand from dough held in the other.
(Source: Zoominuk)

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Beth Stackpole
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Welcome kitchen helper
Beth Stackpole   9/19/2012 7:06:20 AM
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A little bit of overkill on the size of the robot compared to the actual task it is assigned to do (IMHO), but very fun and cool. Would love to borrow one of these for my kitchen--slicing veggies, preparing lunches. The list is endless!

rpl3000
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
rpl3000   9/19/2012 8:16:38 AM
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 That is fantastic! I love unnecessarily humanoid robots. It reminds me of the show Futurama (Bender).

naperlou
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
naperlou   9/19/2012 8:29:50 AM
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Beth, that is the next step!  A robot that does all the repetitive slicing tasks. 

I wonder about a place like China where there are lots of people.  On the other hand, it is a good sign that their economy is moving up in the value chain.  I expect that the robot shape and the lights, etc. are also good for the visual effect.  After all, it is being used in a consumer environment.  If it were in the back room, you might want to dispense with the aesthetics.

gsmith120
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
gsmith120   9/19/2012 11:19:22 AM
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I agree Beth a bit overkill but interesting invention. 

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
Beth Stackpole   9/19/2012 1:53:31 PM
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Maybe they can line up these robots to man the cooking stations at those Japanese steak houses where they make it a show to cut up meats and veggies and cook them on open fires. I bet the robot theme would be quite an attraction.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
Rob Spiegel   9/19/2012 2:54:38 PM
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This is cool, and the video is great. Yet I agree with Beth. The size is overkill. I would imagine an automated noodle slicer does not need to take a human form any more than an automotive welding robot needs to look human.

Cadman-LT
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
Cadman-LT   9/19/2012 4:48:49 PM
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I agree. What is the point in making it look human? especially if it's hidden back in the kitchen anyway.

TJ McDermott
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The draw to this is cultural
TJ McDermott   9/20/2012 12:08:20 AM
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I'm perplexed at the draw to this.  I would guess it is cultural.  The robot uses motion control technology, but it replaced only one person to save them the repetitive injury.  The robot looks like it makes noodles no faster than a human could.

Why not a more traditional noodle press and slitter?  Same regimented noodles, but they can be made much faster.

The motion of the dough pan was impressive (small, precise indexes), and one presumes that it also indexes in a vertical direction as the dough block gets pared down.  But is duplicating a human's motion exactly the best approach?

Beth Stackpole
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Re: The draw to this is cultural
Beth Stackpole   9/20/2012 7:33:17 AM
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It's funny. Right after I read this post, I saw a clip on the local Boston news stations last night about a similar looking robot called Baxter from Rethink Robotics that reminded me of this guy. The company is promising its "common sense" robot will revamp U.S. manufacturing. Big claims, I know, but it seems promising. But just like the robot that's the focus of this post, I wonder if we run the risk of getting so robot-crazy that we overbake what this technology is really well suited to do and end up with more complex manufacturing processes as opposed to really streamlined ones for optimal productivity.

jhankwitz
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Robots
jhankwitz   9/20/2012 10:09:04 AM
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In reality, most every device we design and make is a robot of sort.  Adding the unnecessary features and eyes is what is selling this kitchen slicer at a high price to perform a very rudimentary task.

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