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Slideshow: Military Robots Extend Humans' Reach
1/7/2013

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The Python HTR climbs stairs and navigates difficult terrain to assist humans in hazmat, tactical, and reconnaissance operations. Simulator Systems' operator control  unit software includes a user interface that depends on touch gestures for controlling the robot's movement, adjusting cameras, modifying settings, or changing views. The software also incorporates a secure, digital communication protocol for transmitting video. The HTR is based on the company's Robotics Relay System for Communication in Urban Environments software. This incorporates mesh networking, like that used for smart power grids, to control multiple robots or relay surveillance cameras, and to use them as a network of mobile signal transmission points. The robot's hardware is built in a modular fashion, so operators can swap out all components in the field without tools: accessories, cameras, OEM monitors, and even the Master Control Unit containing the robot's critical electronic systems.   (Source: Simulator Systems)
The Python HTR climbs stairs and navigates difficult terrain to assist humans in hazmat, tactical, and reconnaissance operations. Simulator Systems' operator control unit software includes a user interface that depends on touch gestures for controlling the robot's movement, adjusting cameras, modifying settings, or changing views. The software also incorporates a secure, digital communication protocol for transmitting video. The HTR is based on the company's Robotics Relay System for Communication in Urban Environments software. This incorporates mesh networking, like that used for smart power grids, to control multiple robots or relay surveillance cameras, and to use them as a network of mobile signal transmission points. The robot's hardware is built in a modular fashion, so operators can swap out all components in the field without tools: accessories, cameras, OEM monitors, and even the Master Control Unit containing the robot's critical electronic systems.
(Source: Simulator Systems)

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tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Adorable
tekochip   1/8/2013 11:37:25 AM
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Even in the consumer world the model aircraft electronics seem to double in performance every year. Brushless motors are now common, lithium battries weigh less than the motor and digital radios are about the size of a matchbook. The military deserves some credit for dreaming up the idea of using hobbyist technology.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Adorable
Ann R. Thryft   1/7/2013 11:47:49 AM
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Nadine and Elizabeth, glad you liked the slideshow. Like Nadine, I think the Nighthawk is kinda cute, too. Looking like an actual (if antique) plane, it's got a bit more personality than the quadrocopters that seem to dominate flying robots right now.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Adorable
NadineJ   1/7/2013 11:37:08 AM
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I know that's not the first word that should come to mind for military equipment but the Nighthawk Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) is just adorable!

I can picture the TerraMax (UGV) used for medical transport.

Very cool.  Thanks for the slide show!

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Interesting technology
Elizabeth M   1/7/2013 6:47:06 AM
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It's quite interesting to see the latest and greatest in robots from the military, which as usual is on the bleeding edge in terms of sophistication and functionality. I'm not sure if these types of robots will ever replace human activity but they certainly make some tasks safer for military personnel and enhance their capability.

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