HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Wolfe's Den

Do Tough Employer Words Presage Better Engineering Employment?

View Comments: Threaded|Newest First|Oldest First
Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Lack of Qualified Engineers
Rob Spiegel   6/24/2011 11:40:52 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, I've been hearing about this "lack of qualified U.S. engineers" for the past few years. I've heard a number explanations for it:

1. Engineering isn't cool any longer, so our best and brightest are not rushing to degree programs.

2. We no longer have the influx of engineers and engineering students from Asia, since the world is flat. The best and brightest from Asia can stay home and succeed now, so they're not leaving family to come here.

3. The boomers are retiring and taking their decades-long skillset with them.

I've also heard plant managers say they're seeing light at the end of the tunnel. As engineering begins to move entirely to software, new bright students are beginning to pay attention. They're beginning to see that engineering is like playing video games all day.

I've also heard that the thousands of engineers in Mexico have come up to U.S. standards in their expertise in recent years. A manager at a Detroit auto plant recently commented that Mexican engineers used to be far behind their U.S. counterparts and that has changed. Now this source believes Mexican engineers are on par with U.S. engineers.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
Beth Stackpole   6/24/2011 12:48:31 PM
NO RATINGS
As a mom of a 13 1/2 year old who says he's interested in engineering, I think anything we can do to promote and engage our youth in engineering early on is absolutely critical to nuturing talent and addressing the shortage (real or otherwise). I know I get a boatload of press releases on school-age competitions and there is a growing amount of TV programming (my kids love Myth Busters) dedicated to making engineering cool, a laudable trend in cultivating an interest among our youth. Take that and couple it with our kids' absolute comfort and ease with software and computers, and it's a great recipe in the making for a new generation of US engineers that can beat the pants off any one!

MBA-Motorsport
User Rank
Iron
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
MBA-Motorsport   6/24/2011 1:50:27 PM
There are a few problems with engineering, here are a few as i perceive.

1. Engineering is genearlly boring, not much glamour etc.

2. Engineering is actually hard work, it takes concentration, dilligence and care to be an engineer.

3. Nobody else in the world actually values engineering, mainly because they don't know what we do.

4. The pay is rubbish for the amount of study required to be an engineer.

5. The title engineer is devalued by its application to a bloke who fixes the washing machine for example, the title engineer should only be used for trades that really are engineering, not mechanics and fixers.

6. the image of engineers has been damaged by stereotyping over the years, and the stiff white shirt and tie image is simply not cool.

7. engineering is a disciplined carreer, and who wants discipline in a world of non.

just a few for now and just my perceptions after a long and tiring carreer as an engineer.

 

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
sensor pro   6/24/2011 3:04:19 PM
NO RATINGS
You are so correct. Nobody understandus-nor repects us. The title "engineer" is constantly missused. I saw a few years ago on a mortgage application a school janitor stated that he is a sanitation engineer.

I'm sure that today we have too many great real engineers on the open market, however I feel that large firms are setting the stage to try and hire work force abroad and much lower cost. Lok at any large firm and their customer support stuff. It is located in countries I can't even find on the map. It is not new. Claim a problem and suddenly you fing a solution in south India or some other far away place.

I'm sure that qualification of our engineers is not the real problem.

 

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
K.I.S.S.   6/24/2011 4:40:12 PM
NO RATINGS
In the U.K., people that operate sewerage farms are now known by the title of 'waste water channeling operatives' it's a global problem, and one that in my opinion seeks to devalue qualified and experienced people in favour of cheap labour with exhalted titles...

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
sensor pro   6/24/2011 4:52:18 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree. It is a global problem. In US it is abit more serious. Some firms actually post jobs with funky "******** engineer", however in the description it clearly states no engineering degree.  It is a big problem.

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
K.I.S.S.   6/24/2011 5:26:20 PM
NO RATINGS
At the end of the day, I suppose that it's a skill related issue - no matter how many letters after your name, if you can get the job done, within budget - then you're the man. Don't let any negative perceptions of your career get you down - it's still better than working in a fast food outlet..... And don't forget that your Company needs you - you have that power.....

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
sensor pro   6/25/2011 12:28:41 AM
NO RATINGS
I think that I need to explain my point of view from a different angle, as I feel that some of you feel that I have a negative perception of my career. As a R&D director in a sensor firm and a college lecturer I have seen many changes in the industry in the past 30 years. One shift is in the interpretation of what the engineer is. We all agree that in medical industry you will not see a guy that draws  blood called MD. we call them phebotomists. Each person in medical field has it own responsibilities and tasks and titles, even when a nurse knows more then a new MD, we do not call her MD.

The opposit occurs in the engineering field. This is why I feel that education and determination should be reflected in persons sallary and title.

In talking to many graduates and fellow engineers I hear how concerned they are that many jobs go to other countries due to lower salaries. This is terrible. A few weeks ago i installed a new router and even though I read English "pretty well", I had problems understanding the manual. So I decided to call a support line. After pressing all button combinations on my phone I finally was transferred to a breathing consultant. WOW..... I was not prepaired to this one !  I guess they forgot to state in the manual that I had to learn another language to get support, as in English they only knew a few words. One of the words was "sorry".

I'm sure that if the service dept was in any US state, the service call would have been better.

I'm sure we all agree to that.

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
K.I.S.S.   6/25/2011 7:07:56 AM
NO RATINGS
It's a very interesting and thought provoking debate, and there appears to be two seperate topics under discussion. On the issue of employers overlooking skilled indigenous perssons there doesn't appear to be any argument - I think everyone is agreed that in todays world, we have to move away from false economies and strengthen our skilled workforce with citizens of our own respective countries, or eventually we will simply lose the ability to do so and be forced to rely on 3rd parties. The other issue appears to be the misuse of the term 'engineer' - as I appear to be the only person in this conversation without a degree, perhaps I can offer a different perspective? Whilst I agree that the term is widely misused, and even abused - how important is that? I can see it being an irritation to someone who has devoted years of their life to study, but isn't the worth of your position derived from the results that you achieve? I have also devoted years of my life to self study, and have become a subject matter expert in my field - the satisfaction I obtain in my job lies in the succesful invention and design of new and unique products, and the remuneration and praise I recieve for such.

As was previously mentioned, nurses are not referred to as doctors, but by the same token, there are doctors that have inadvertently tried to kill me in the past...

As a suggestion, an easy way to distinguish yourselves from a 'dish washing engineer' would be to refer to yourselves as a 'graduate engineer' - this practice is becoming more common in the U.K., which also suffers from the same bloated use of the term.

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
sensor pro   6/25/2011 1:09:32 PM
NO RATINGS
The issue of missuse is in US only. I work closely with a team in Germany, and they all have  DPL.ING. on their cards.  All major European states including former USSR do not play with educational titles.

 

Th issue is not feeling bad about the title but in some cases wasting time on people that you expect to be one thing and finding they are not.

When I hire employees i like to ask them to perform a basic task. Recently I needed to assemble an R&D team with a couple of techs. I conducted over 20 interviews and asked a basic thing: to solder a few parts on a PCB. I was amased how techs with 20 years of lab experience were able to murder the setup. Finally I had a guy in a leather jacket asked me to give him a chance. He just got out of service as a level 3 lab tech. He did a super job. He got the job on the spot, and only had 2 years lab experience.He did not claim education, diplomas, etc... Just a chance to show his work.

 

I guess I "kissed many frogs until finding a prince".

My expectation from engineers is the ability to perform independant work and research. Knowledge of physics and math, and clear thinking.

I just hope that we make the correct changes and bring back the technology that we give to other back to US to employ our own.

 

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
K.I.S.S.   6/25/2011 2:57:20 PM
NO RATINGS
You raise a valid point regarding time wasters, but whilst you state that it's a U.S. issue only, I have to to contend that point - in many countries (and I'm currently resident in South Africa, originating from England and widely travelling for business purposes), the term 'Engineer' is an extremely generic one - if I want to get a spur gear cut, then I take it to the 'engineers' - in other words, the tool room where the fitter and turner will clock the dividing head and machine it for me. It should be correctly called a machining shop, but it's not. it's called an engineering shop in many countries.

And you make a very good case in point about proving one's worth through a practical test - isn't that the true judgement of one's ability? And in any business environment, surely that should be worth more than any individuals theoretical ability to perform the duties they've been engaged for...? I feel that the argument extends into the field of the professional - at the end of the day, we live in a results driven environment.

We're in danger of losing sight of the original premise - that idiots sometimes disguise themselves under the cover of a title. You say that you expect an engineer to perform independant research, display clear thinking and have knowledge of physics and math?

I'm going to play devils advocate for a moment, and please don't think that this is in any way intended personally - I assure you that isn't the case (and remember that I have absolutly zero academic qualifications, and I'm peversly proud of that fact...)

As an employer, I seek, primarily, the ability of any individual employee to perform the tasks that they've been appointed for - why should I care what qualifications they have? As I say, it's a results orientated environment.... For compliance, qualiative and legislative issues, I'd be very sure to check references - but conversly, for an engineer, I wouldn't bother... I'd just ask a few questions and require a proposed solution - that's my benchmark - right there. Many other professions can obsfurcate their response behind terminology - but an engineer (or in my case, a designer) cannot. There's a quantative output to the job that doesn't exist in many other fields.

I believe that I have the generic qualities you require of an engineer, but I also feel that I would be unsuccessful in any application to many Companies, owing to my lack of formal qualifications - and that's where my contention starts.... I can do the job - and have a proven track record of doing so - so pay me what I'm worth to the Company, in terms of it's profits accruing from my employment within it, not on the basis of a theoretical, and assumed ability to do so...

Well, that should set the cat amongst the pidgeons, so I'll be keeping my head down for a few days hahahaha

 

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
sensor pro   6/25/2011 4:23:38 PM
NO RATINGS
You make many valid points. Personally I respect self motivation and performance oriented people. I can only tell you that for me the advanced degree was a waste of time as my teachers were pure theory lovers and had no practical experience. I can not tell you is I used 5% of what I studied with them. On the other hand it gave me ability to try and think on my own and solve problems independantly.

I am a full believer of testing people performance. The only thing that I do not do when someone states that he is an engineer, is ask him basics. I assume he knows it. The basics must be there. The rest is imagination and attitude.

I also found a very interesting trend. For some reason large corporations lay off the best guys. I'm puzzled by it. Sometimes we use consultants and the best ones are the ones that are unemployed or just lost the job. I do not care about degrees at that point. My goal is to find the one that knows that specific task, and I look for knowledge.

I think we have so much wasted talant floating around, it is such a shame. So many people can do so much good. !!!!!

 

On a personal level, never been to South Africa, but worked with a few firms.

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
K.I.S.S.   6/26/2011 3:03:48 PM
NO RATINGS
It's a bit of a conundrum, isn't it? - on the one hand further study is supposed to enhance one's ability to form independant opinions - but the process of doing so would appear to involve doing that by yourself....independantly..... and the old adage that those who can, do - those that can't, teach, still holds water,

And in my opinion, the fact that all the best people get laid off is simply that they are the best, and therefore the most expensive cost to Company personnel....

As far as I'm concerned, it's an utterly disengenuous process, and one that disenfranchises worthy people, deserving of opportunity owing to their ability.

So let's all just get our begging bowls out, and knock on the door of Asia.....

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Lack of Qualified Engineers
K.I.S.S.   6/24/2011 4:51:24 PM
NO RATINGS
I understand and fully appreciate your frustrations, but isn't this the Design News website? by that, I mean that it's supposed to be a forum for designers, some of whom have little or no mechanical or electronic knowledge, but still desire to produce a quality product for the end user? Why not rather be constructive and use the site to tell people about things they can do? it's just a thought, and again, I appreciate your perspective,,,,,

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
A war for talent
Charles Murray   6/24/2011 11:43:14 AM
NO RATINGS
Unfortunately, it's true that there's a war for talent out there, and the war is on both sides. Yes, companies like Siemens are battling to get the best talent. But engineers are battling, too. They're fighting for those jobs against an influx of H-1B visa talent.  

sadanrose
User Rank
Iron
Devalued "Engineer"
sadanrose   6/24/2011 6:04:31 PM
NO RATINGS
We as a country have devalued the term "Engineer" for many decades.  I work for an industry that has less than 15% of its engineering workforce having an Engineering degree.  I feel that the term Engineer should only be applied to persons with an Engineering Degree.  I know I have worked extremely hard to complete my degree and to be lumped in the same category with people without a technical degree is a slap in the face of the work I put in to achieve that degree.  Therefore, I feel the term “Specialist” or “Designer” would better fit the individual without a technical degree especially in my field. 

On the flip side on this argument, as a person with an Engineering degree in a field with less than 15% of its engineering workforce with engineering or a technical degree, I should a have a promising future in this field.  Unfortunately, most hiring manager don’t the value the engineering degree.  Their primary concern is experience or seniority.  But how can someone get the required experience without be in the position to get the experience needed. 

So, when I read articles that state there are no qualified engineers for the latest positions.  I always think how many young engineers that they passed over because they didn’t the right skill set or enough experience for the position.  The one thing I know about a person with an engineering degree is that they have the ability to learn and learn quickly.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Devalued "Engineer"
Alexander Wolfe   6/24/2011 9:37:55 PM
NO RATINGS
The way I look at it, you wouldn't allow somebody who'd "learned" brain surgery on their own from a book to operate on you (or to call themselves a doctor), so how come people who've played around with a PC get to call themselves engineers? Now, there are definitely some flaws in my argument, mostly notably that the registration procedures for engineers -- namely, the P.E. -- isn't really applicable to the work most engineers do. Sure, it's great for C.E.s and some M.E,s, who have to sign off on certain legal documents. But the P.E. doesn't really make sense for the typical engineer working in the corporate sector. So maybe we need to look at other means of licensing; a sensible test that all engineer school grads can be routed to, can make part of their graduation (Part 1 at grad, Part 2 after five years experience). Not all that different from P.E., but perhaps different content in the test; more work-oriented, less of a requirement of having to prove you can do stuff out of your own specialty.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
H-1B must go
TJ McDermott   6/25/2011 12:09:21 AM
NO RATINGS
H-1B visas must go.  There is ZERO justification for this absurd policy when unemployment is at 9 pecent.

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: H-1B must go
sensor pro   6/25/2011 12:31:19 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree. You are totally correct. We have to hire our own. I would also offer some incentives to firms to bring back their customer support divisions. It is better to give tax breaks or incentives to corporations then pay unemployment.

 

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Hey, I like being an engineer!
Dave Palmer   6/26/2011 1:38:13 AM
NO RATINGS
Sometimes it seems like the people with the worst perceptions of the engineering profession are engineers themselves.  Honestly, I'm not quite sure what all of the complaining is about.

I think I have a great job where I get to solve all kinds of interesting problems, where I get to learn new things every day, and where I get to work with great people.  I may never be a millionaire, but I make enough money to support a family of four - and I know a lot of people (not engineers) who support bigger families than mine on a lot less.  Besides, how many other people get paid to do something they really enjoy?

The perceptions of others have never been a major consideration for me.  That being said, I've never encountered anything but respect when I tell people what I do for a living.  In fact, when I describe the work I do, many people are fascinated.

As far as H1B visas are concerned, the idea that H1B visa holders have some kind of unfair advantage in the job market is simply not true, in my experience.  As a matter of fact, it's just the opposite.  From what I've seen, most companies prefer to hire U.S. citizens and permanent residents because they don't want to bother with the paperwork that goes along with sponsoring an H1B visa - not to mention the uncertainties involved in the visa lottery process, export control restrictions, etc.  I had many classmates in college who were from other countries, and in general they had a much harder time getting jobs in the U.S. after graduation than other students.  That's one reason why many foreign students stay in academia.

In summary, I think engineering is a great profession, and I would recommend it to anyone, including my two teenage daughters.  Engineers have nothing to be ashamed of, and many things to be proud of.  There is no reason why engineers ought to feel inferior to anyone else.

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Hey, I like being an engineer!
K.I.S.S.   6/26/2011 3:45:21 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree - I love my job too.. Although I'm not an Engineer, I'm a designer - but when you think about it, as you effectively spend a 3rd of your life working, shouldn't you do something you enjoy? I most certainly do - and one of the best feelings is to be driving along the road, and then see something that you made/designed.... and point it out to every passenger in the car (my Fiance is sick of it...) it's a good feeling, and surely that's one of the best motivations to put both feet on the floor every morning......

As a sidebar - this is the Design News website? maybe it should be re-named the Engineering design news website....haha it apppears that every contributor has passed through hallowed portals and emerged the other side with a mortar board....

I haven't, I never had any interest in doing so, and I'm just looking for an open discussion forum that addresses everyday design issues...

 

 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Is Design News for designers or engineers?
Charles Murray   6/26/2011 7:06:09 PM
NO RATINGS
To K.I.S.S. -- Design News' name is a little misleading. In the days when this magazine was launched (1946, I believe), "design" generally referred to engineering design. The readers were all educated pretty similarly -- i.e., full complement of classes in strength of materials, circuit analysis, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, etc. Industrial design -- which is more oriented to design and less oriented toward math and science -- grew in popularity later on. We still, however, have kept the "Design News" name, even as the interpretation of the word "design" has changed. The name does cause confusion, but we are essentially an engineering design magazine.  

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: Is Design News for designers or engineers?
sensor pro   6/26/2011 9:59:01 PM
NO RATINGS
I do not see a problem with the name. It is important that the site brings in smart and innovative people to review and introduce interesting issues related to design. Any design: electrical, electronic, mechanical, robotics, marine, etc.....

I personally like integration of various sensors into numerous applications. Usually during the day I may talk to 10-15 different clients from 10-15 different industries. This is what makes my day pass fast.

The more applications the better for me.

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Is Design News for designers or engineers?
K.I.S.S.   6/29/2011 4:49:12 PM
NO RATINGS
So why do I feel mildly unwelcome - without a degree? I'm fully conversant in all the feilds previously mentioned by yourself, although self taught in all of them. And the one area that I excel in is that of mechanical design, specifically in miniaturisation.

Once again, I'll state my claim that this is a results driven environment - anything else is simply drivel..... you get paid for it, so prove it.....

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Is Design News for designers or engineers?
K.I.S.S.   6/29/2011 5:32:49 PM
NO RATINGS
OK, I've been brooding over your comments for a little while, I've taken the time to reveiw them - and I'm bloody annoyed by them. The interpretation of the word 'Design' has not, and will not (in my humble opinion) ever change. it means precisely what it means.

I am a designer, and I am proud of that fact. By which i certainly do not mean that I am lacking in materials, thermodynamic, or fluid dynamic skills, and the interpolation of such factors into any of my designs. I'm fully aware that a rigourous theoretical environment is conducive to a functional product, but I take issue with the fact that it tends to be exclusive within the context of our conversation....

Surely it is within the remit of this title to incorporate, and indeed, actively encourage, designers?

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Is Design News for designers or engineers?
Charles Murray   6/29/2011 7:09:12 PM
NO RATINGS
I apologize. You are correct that the magazine is for "anyone who desires to produce a quality product." I was merely responding to your earlier comment, which was "it's supposed to be a forum for designers, some of whom have little or no mechanical or electronic knowledge..." My point is that, despite the name, our readers generally do have mechanical or electronic knowledge. That said, it doesn't preclude designers from having opinions that are equally valid.

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Is Design News for designers or engineers?
K.I.S.S.   7/1/2011 12:55:30 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm sorry for not responing sooner - the entire cell phone network of the largest service provider in South Africa went off line over the past 24 hours.. Somebody cut through one of their underground fibeoptic cables.. (and that could make an interesting disscusion regarding internodal design...) anyway, as I'm connected via a wireless network, I was offline.

In retrospect, and considering your explanation regarding the progenesis of your comment, I feel that I owe you an apology, not the other way around - I personally do have knowledge of many mechanical factors and some electronic ones that influence design  My contention in previous comments was based around the premise that many people who have 'an idea' without any previous exposure to the environment, but yet wish to develop it further, simply have no idea as to how to proceed. Certainly, there are many design houses that can ably assist, but for the home inventor, this is money that sometimes they quite simply don't have. I'm approached on an almost weekly basis by people who 'have a great idea...' and want me to design it from concept through prototype, then manufacturing setup and basically nursemaid them through the entire process upto and including how the marketing stategy should be focused.... Err, no. Sorry.

So, to cut to the chase - isn't this a wonderful opportunity to provide just some basic advice to the home inventor (possibly as a sub-forum or seperate link)? There's such a wealth of talent subscribed to this publication, and it's heart breaking to constantly have to listen to 'the next Rubiks Cube' pitch - and, admittedly, sometimes narcolepsy inducing....

So what do you think? Personally, I'd be happy to contribute, but obviously I'm not conversant in all the relevant areas required to bring an idea drawn on the back of an envelope into production....

If enough willing contributors could be found, it could form the basis of a truly useful resouce to the home inventor, and let's face it - we need them - even if it's only one in a thousand that has any viable chance of success.

I've always held with the philosophy that individuals who only know 'just enough' to hold on to their position are very reticent to freely disclose information, but true experts in their fields are always more than willing to do so.

It could be just a simple message board with a few basics - has it been done before, is it possible, how much money am I looking at spending etc

Anyway, once again, I'm sorry for any misunderstanding and I'd appreciate and value your comments on what I just proposed.

 

Greg Stirling
User Rank
Platinum
A Shortage of Engineers?
Greg Stirling   6/27/2011 5:30:57 PM
NO RATINGS
I did read the story about Siemens search for qualified talent.  So I went on their website and looked at their job listinigs.  Here is what I found.  A total of 1879 jobs were listed nationwide. Out of the 1879 jobs, 474 were for engineering.  Out of the 474 there were 10 engineering positions total in all of Northern and Central California.  

Out of those 10, 8 were for electrical/building automation, and 2 were for rail device and related software.

When I see headlines like 'Siemens needs 3000 Engineers'  and 'Is hiring recruiters to fill the need' I get the impression that any qualified engineer can run out and get a job. 

Not so much...

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Checking the Boxes
Jack Rupert, PE   6/28/2011 4:19:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Here's a quick anecdote regarding Manpower's Joerres comment, "Employers have a much more sophisticated definition of skill requirements."

I was recently approached by a recruiter for engineering leader type opportunity.  One of the questions he had was "what is your experience with brand 'X' CAD".  When I stated that my company had not used 'X' that was the end of conversation.  Nothing about technical skills, management philosophy or the fact that skilled engineer could learn brand 'X' in a matter of weeks.  If he couldn't check off every box on this list, he didn't want to have anything to do with you.

sadanrose
User Rank
Iron
Re: Checking the Boxes
sadanrose   6/28/2011 6:04:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Jack, I agree with you completely.  This is the problem.  Companies now have a specific person with specific skills or knowledge in mind before they even interview their candidates.  Unfortunately, if you don't fit in this extremely small box of skills and experience, your application is pretty much glance over or even thrown in the trash.  Like you stated Jack, a "skilled" engineer could have learned the X brand in a few weeks.

What happen to training?  I have an MBA also, so I understand the need to hire someone who can start working on day one.  But delaying hiring because you can't find the perfect fit is costly too.  The time they took finding the perfect individual, they could have hired Jack.  And he could have learned X in the same timeframe it possibly took them to find the "perfect fit".

The funniest part of this situation is that in the next year or so, they will probably be using another brand of CAD.  Now that's funny!!!

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Checking the Boxes
K.I.S.S.   6/29/2011 5:00:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi Jack,

I have a question that I'd really appreciate your honest answer to - indeed any individuals answer.....

When you became an engineeer, following University, did you envisage yourself in the position that you're now occupying? or are you now the manager you didn't want to be....?

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Checking the Boxes
Jack Rupert, PE   6/30/2011 12:53:38 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi K.I.S.S,

Considering that at the moment I am "between jobs", the specific answer is NO, but that's probably not what you were getting at!

Actually, when I first started my engineering education I was thinking of going into Law and this background was going to give me some tools that other wouldn't have.  The change away from that came gradually over the 4 years, part was due to my enjoyment of my part-time engineering assistant job and part was due to talking to law students who were telling me about the diffent culture in Law School (backstabbing, grades at all costs, vs. the collaborative nature of EE).

Once I graduated and started full time, I saw the need to build my credibility to advance, which is why I started in a part-time MBA program.

K.I.S.S.
User Rank
Silver
Re: Checking the Boxes
K.I.S.S.   7/1/2011 1:23:15 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi Jack

A man is walking through the jungle, when he steps into a pitfall trap... When he comes round in the dugout with deep vertical walls, he realises that he's not alone - there's a lion, a leopard and a lawyer in there with him - so he draws his pistol, but then realises he's only got two bullets left... what does he do...?

He shoots the lawyer twice, just to make sure.....

I'm glad you chose the other (engineering) route - especially if you consider the description in the 'Devils Dictionary' A lawyer - 'One skilled at circumvention of the law...'

But as you say, the focus of my question was that someone spends years of their life studying to become proficient in a subject that they have a passion for only to find themselves, a few years later, being the manager/overseer of the person that has now been appointed into their previous position - I think that's a sad indictment of most industries....

 

Partner Zone
More Blogs from Wolfe's Den
Our LinkedIn systems and product design engineering group discusses if they are happy with their decision of remaining a technical contributor instead of becoming a manager.
Design News has launched its first Apple iPad app, and we want to give it to you for free.
Design News readers are asked to submit their captions for a cartoon, as part of our monthly reader caption contest.
Will the electric vehicle survive its current round of technological success?
Our LinkedIn group has varying opinions on government support for US manufacturing technology.
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service