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Sherlock Ohms

Preflight Inspection Averted Crash

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far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: Close attention pays off
far911   7/18/2013 6:15:59 AM
NO RATINGS
@Eliizabeth - Cars are more forgiving in this regard since there's no danger of them falling off the sky. The consequences of not paying attention to car maintenance are much less severe. That said, it doesn't mean one should completely ignore the ordeal. It's alright if you skip a monthly maintenance check. 

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: Vents can't be skipped
far911   7/18/2013 6:18:04 AM
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@TJ McDermott - That's a very informative post. Thanks for sharing. 

ragtoplvr
User Rank
Gold
Re: Fuel Systems
ragtoplvr   7/18/2013 8:50:43 AM
I had a similar problem on my boat.  It would idle just fine but had no power.  The hub of the propeller where the exhaust flows was packed almost completley full of mud dauber wasp nests. 

 

Another time the tell tail water indicator, that indicates the water pump is working did not discharge any water.  It had a different species of wasp build nest in the tube. 

 

Last, there were the wasps that built nest in the hollow tube of the trailer. 

 

That one got me stung

Rod

mrmikel
User Rank
Iron
Re: Close attention pays off
mrmikel   7/18/2013 9:01:43 AM
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A great reminder that routine checks can be anything but routine.  Reminds me of Sherlock Holmes...you see but you do not observe.


The author did both and prevented a crash.

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Wasps brought down 757
Battar   7/18/2013 9:03:04 AM
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Check this link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birgenair_Flight_301

A Turkish Boeing 757 was brought down by wasps in the speed sensing pitot tube, with the loss of all 189 people on board.

jfowkes
User Rank
Iron
Re: Close attention pays off
jfowkes   7/18/2013 9:16:31 AM
NO RATINGS
@far911 "Cars are more forgiving in this regard since there's no danger of them falling off the sky. The consequences of not paying attention to car maintenance are much less severe."

That's not necessarily true. If the engine had stopped in mid-air, the pilot would (almost certainly, unless they were very unlucky or were flying too low) have time to glide to a suitable site for a forced landing.

Conversely, imagine a badly maintained tyre exploding on a busy, wet motorway. You only have seconds to keep control of the vehicle before you might hit something solid.

j-allen
User Rank
Gold
Re: Close attention pays off
j-allen   7/18/2013 9:16:57 AM
NO RATINGS
A good friend of mine also had a mud dauber clog in the pitot tube of the air speed indicator.  (I think it was on a Curtiss Robin.)  Fortunately he was a skillful enough pilor to make a "seat of the pants" landing but it was scary. 

 

Another critter that causes clogs is the spider that forms cotton ball like webs inside small openings.  They frequently block up the venturi tubes of outdoor gas grills.

AREV
User Rank
Gold
Re: Close attention pays off
AREV   7/18/2013 9:24:16 AM
NO RATINGS
After 11 years my my Walker mower w/ Kawasaki engine would start, perform okay for about 2 minutes, die and require about 5 minutes, repeat. Luckily my dealer knew that there was a vent in a brass plug that could not be seen through even when clean. The instructions were remove the plug, soak it in gas over night, blow on it  and run the engine another 11 year bnd hope we remember how to fix it again. That's a lawn mower. I would think an air plane would engineer that issue out or have a sensor to detect vaccuum or pressure in the tank.

WA4WZP
User Rank
Iron
Re: Close attention pays off
WA4WZP   7/18/2013 9:34:41 AM
NO RATINGS
Obviously this writer is not a pilot...or maybe a pilot that has never had an engine stop in mid-flight. I have! An automobile tire exploding (I have), even in busy traffic, is not even in the same 'world' as an airplane engine stopping in flight, or on take off, or on landing!

bob from maine
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Fuel Systems
bob from maine   7/18/2013 10:11:03 AM
NO RATINGS
As a 15 year old student pilot I was frequently 'tested' to be sure I paid suitable attention to all aspects of flying. My instructor would occasionally shut off the fuel at the selector valve (which was between the seats and not in my field of view). The engine would lose power and then die. I had to do the standard 'engine-out' routine, determine a suitable landing spot, wind direction, speed, identify local hazards, prepare to notify the local tower that I was landing. As soon as I had completed all the necessary tasks he would turn the fuel back on and we would continue - or not, once. You ignore anomolies at your peril. The fan is not the most important thing on an aircraft, the pilot is. Good story!

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