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Sherlock Ohms

The Dodge Truck Was a Magnetized Mess

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Stuart21
User Rank
Silver
Re: GREAT Detective work ...
Stuart21   12/4/2012 9:24:14 PM
"What's really a total bummer is that his "discovery" went unacknowledged & unrewarded"

Absolutely. This is the penalty for offending the wage slave geniuses 'inside'. Have a wealth of experience in this area.

Solution might be to copyright your solution (& maybe a patent application) (DIY ONLY) - don't waste money on patent attorneys!!!!

Then advise Co you have a solution, cost is $xxxx, disclosure available for $xxx, (or free disclosure with NDA / NCA (Non disclosure agreement / non compete agreement) & 7 days to accept. 

Your solution is a very valuable asset & many cos would try to obtain by any means. Many have no qualms about stealing even IP, often advised by their IP counsel to do so - said counsel cognisant that lawyers always win, clients only average 50% win - & that is before costs.

Right now I would like to share some ideas with Fedex - been a customer of theirs for 20 odd years - asked them if I were to disclose it, would they agree to not use ideas without further agreement - reply is (before disclosure ;-) ) 'We do not wish to employ you'.

Stuart Saunders.

IPROAG Intellectual Property Rightful Owners Action Goup.

 

 

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Car makers don't offer enough support
Amclaussen   12/5/2012 2:29:37 PM
EXACTLY!  Newer cars are a nightmare to maintain.  Maybe they are somewhat maintenance-free for some 3-5 years, but eventually, a belt, belt tensioner, hose, filter, water pump, or spark-plugs WILL need to be changed... THEN the terrible design job of the factory "geniuses" will be immediately apparent!

I've just finished a "revamp" project on my old 1991 Dodge Spirit R/T, consisting of upgrading the original smallish turbo Intercooler and engine radiator with newer, larger units. These units were less expensive than the original replacements, so I decided to go to as large possible sizes, meant for other makes and models of cars.  Taking advantage of the disassembly already done to modify the car, I decided to replace the timing belt and tensioner, the water pump and all the accessories belts.  Even when I had to remove a lot of brackets, belt covers, the Air Conditioner Compressor, the Alternator and one engine mount, I had just enough space and clearance to perform all the tasks without too much knuckle chafing and bruising...

But looking at the task of water-pump and timing belt replacement on a 2006 Dodge Stratus is ANOTHER matter! Not only is insufficient space to use any hand tool, but component location and disassembly requirements make that otherwise simple task a complete nightmare, probably requiring the whole engine to be dropped from the car.

What overly optimistic (and dumb) ideas were inside the brain (if any) of the "automotive designers" that create present day automobiles? Can anybody assure that not a single component will fail before warranty ends and needs a difficult and lenghty disassembly before the vehicle is close to its true useful life?

marcopolo
User Rank
Iron
But...
marcopolo   2/12/2013 1:35:58 PM
NO RATINGS
  The small block Dodge/Chrysler/Plymouth does not *have* any

gear on the bottom of the distributor!  Unlike a Ford/Chevrolet, the gear

is on the oil pump driveshaft and the distributor shaft has only a tang on

the bottom of it's shaft that engages a slot on top of the oil pump shaft. Makes it really easy to remove/replace them as you can only install it one of two ways!  Could the author be mis-remembering the manufacturer?  No one takes out the oil pump drive shaft when replacing a distributor...

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