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Sherlock Ohms

There's a Mystery Glitch in the Pipe Organ

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Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: Tried and true engineering skills
Beth Stackpole   9/26/2012 7:10:32 AM
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Love that example, Nancy. Being able to leverage your professionals skills with your personal passions has to be extremely rewarding and a great way to keep your credentials fresh. Not to mention, the possibilities for another income stream! Enjoy and keep up the great work.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Tried and true engineering skills
Nancy Golden   9/26/2012 12:04:16 PM
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Thanks Beth! It is always a lot of fun when it comes time to test our new products and I get to saddle up my horse Pistol for a day of "work."

notarboca
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Gold
Re: Tried and true engineering skills
notarboca   9/29/2012 10:42:54 PM
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kenish--thanks for the reference to the other article.  Between these two, I have learned a lot about what relays can do (both desired and undesirable) in a given circuit.

William K.
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Platinum
The mystery glitch in the organ.
William K.   10/5/2012 9:34:28 PM
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Very good diagnostics, and certainly a fault mode that would be quite challenging to predict simply by circuit analysis. So the problem was solved, I hope that there was a design change that came from the dicovery of the problem, and a service note sent to the repair people .  That fault mode is not really intuitive. And a quarter of a second is a very short time to hear and evaluate a sound.

So my guess is that there had to be some intuition involved. It is a bit puzzeling about the explanation of how the buzz produced the overload. My guess would have been that it was extending the inrush current time period to where the fuse time delay was exceeded.

Tool_maker
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Platinum
Re: Tried and true engineering skills
Tool_maker   10/10/2012 1:09:04 PM
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  Your example of consistancy in components makes so much sense I think it needs to be amplified. Sometimes an equivalent is not equivalent and can lead to faulty assumptions. I think that is also true in terminology. I do not know if that is ever a case in electronics, but in my field different parts of the country call similar things by different names which can lead to confusion when trying to trouble shoot over the phone.

  I remember an instance when a customer called me at home about a problem he was having and the conversation quickly turned to jargon and we got the problem solved. When I got off the phone, my wife who had listened to the whole call asked me, "Did he understand what you were saying?" Of course. Why? "Because it did not sound like any English I ever heard before."

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Sherlock Ohms highlights stories told by engineers who have used their deductive reasoning and technical prowess to troubleshoot and solve the most perplexing engineering mysteries.
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