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Sherlock Ohms

Beware of the Borrowed Design

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rmeng
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Iron
Where was QC?
rmeng   4/13/2012 9:54:15 AM
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I do agree, but if the SOP was followed for developement, there is no excuse for this to happen.  ISO certification works when the employees follow the deveopement paper trail.  Cut and paste should be caught by the ISO plan.  There is something to say about QC Controls....  It sounds like a total QC failure to me, and a slap on the hand for the engineers for not following the QC plan.

didymus7
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Platinum
Who has the time to do this?
didymus7   4/13/2012 10:36:47 AM
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This was an excellent explanation of the problem and the fix.  And I can tell you exactly why it happened.  The root cause is most probably because the designers were not given enough time to test the design.  The design completion date was not set based on proper design and testing, but more likely set due to a customer PO.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Who has the time to do this?
Rob Spiegel   4/13/2012 10:53:40 AM
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That makes perfect sense, Didymus7. With the ever increasing time-to-market pressures on design, I would imagaine this is a common problem. Each year (maybe six months), you take your product, add new competitive features, and shove it back out the door.

wbswenberg
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Gold
Software Executing without Power
wbswenberg   4/13/2012 11:31:59 AM
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I worked with aerospace software design engineers that expected their software to execute without power.  In fact they specifically designed software for this condition.  When there is the loss of electrical power in an airplane, which can happen any time, for a number of reasons, the electronic box needs to sense this and the software needs to execute shutdwon code for the few seconds left on the caps. Probably all data should be in nonvolatile memory all the time (but usually is not done that way), not registers.

When the electonic box starts up it needs to determine stable staus as soon as possible.  Some times knowing the last state is at least somewhat helpfull.  But again the box will not know the state that it is being power up in.  There are some boxes on the airplane that get enought of the right kind of information to determine the mode of the airplane; ground power, engine power, taxi, climb, cruise, decent and land. 

I had a running debate of the importance of immediately determining the present non-intermitent state of the box inputs so valid condition may be reported.  The project manager insited in following series flight mode "states".  They are sill having trouble because of this false series progression.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Human problem
Rob Spiegel   4/17/2012 2:37:15 PM
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Yes, I think you're right, Chuck. The design engineering staff turns over and the new person simply adjust the existing design to accommodate (though not really accommodating) the new features. Then time-to-market come in as a pressure on design. The features keep getting added on to the old design until the design breaks down.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Complex Systems Fail in Complex Ways
Nancy Golden   4/18/2012 11:29:20 AM
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From my experience, Rob - I think you are correct in it happening all of the time. I look back at some of the test equipment that I worked on that was 15 years old and still expected to meet current test needs. The engineer was expected to add to the design to meet new needs rather than redesign the test set - all in an effort to save money. Every once in awhile we could shake our heads and go "no way, this just won't work" and get to do a total redesign - but that didn't happen very often. If it actually compromised the integrity of the product then we would insist on a redesign, but of course with the economy and lay offs being a fact of life back then - we didn't complain too loudly if we could make it work and it was "good enough." We did the best we could "within the parameters we were given."

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Complex Systems Fail in Complex Ways
Rob Spiegel   4/18/2012 12:57:37 PM
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Interesting story, Nancy. I would imagine that in certain critical areas -- like power supply -- you still had to test to make sure the existing design would work with the new features. That's the odd part about of this story.

focusembedded
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Iron
Re: Complex Systems Fail in Complex Ways
focusembedded   4/24/2012 3:28:13 PM
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Nancy --

Yours was a problem I saw all the time when I was in the development tools business.  The only companies I've encountered where this issue isn't endemic are those where somebody takes the time, on a module by module basis, to write up a spec sheet for what the module in question will and won't do.  Then there's a chance that somebody can produce the document that says, "This won't do that" when his boss says, "Just reuse this old design."  That, I think, is more a comment on human psychology.  But it seems critical that the entire conversation be reframed in the context of, "What changes do we have to make to the existing design in order to make it appropriate for the new design?"  Asking that question assures that the matter is at least addressed, and if the answer is, "So many changes it'd be easier to start over with a clean sheet of paper," that message can be taken to management with some chance of success.

Nowadays I'm out of the development tools business, but it's not as though I don't reguarly see our potential client companies doing exactly what these heavy equipment people did -- largely because management gets it in its head that everything is infinitely reusable unless there's some internal procedure for triggering a review of "reusability" and some kind of document that says, "Ah...  Come to think of it...  No, not at all."

Note that above I say, "potential client companies," and not, "actual clients."  Because where this kind of cavalier behavior is standard practice, it's usually because the company in question is penny wise and pound foolish.  Running, as I do, a high-end design shop where we have a total *value* proposition instead of a message that "we compete strictly on price," I like for the self-selection algorithms for our customers to run in such a way that the guy who regularly reuses too much to "save money" is somebody else's client -- not ours.

It wasn't *that* long ago that we turned away a client who refused to spend the money to buy an extra week of engineering time in order to figure out how to make his system run better with about half as many components in it.  Had he only been building a handful of units a year, not spending the NRE dollars would have made sense.  But he was bulding 15,000 units a year, and 40 hours of engineering time would have saved $8 of BOM cost on every one of them.  When you do the math, in one year, he'd have saved $120,000 (and had a more reliable end product, since it'd have fewer things in it to break).  Or dividing it through anohter way, for NRE costs to have outweighed BOM cost savings, I'd have had to have been charging him more than $3,000 an hour for engineering time.  And as much as I think Focus Embedded is a really good shop with the best product in the business, that rate is a tad high even for us...  ;-)

-- Eric Overton

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Complex Systems Fail in Complex Ways
Nancy Golden   4/24/2012 10:56:18 PM
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You hit it right in the head, Rob - but you would be surprised at how much one can "scavenge" in a company that has been operating for years and has had a lot of test equipment designed and built. I remember on more than one occasion swapping power supplies around for that very reason...or IEEE cards, or memory...or video cards...sometimes we played "ring around the test set" to get the hardware specs we needed.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Complex Systems Fail in Complex Ways
Nancy Golden   4/24/2012 10:59:16 PM
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I feel your pain, Eric. Sometimes it just doesn't make sense that people can't see the obvious...but it happens all the time. Effective cost reduction does not equal inferior quality and sometimes you have to pay more up front to save in the long run, but sometimes you just can't convince people of that. I am with you - I would prefer that they are someone else's customers!

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