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Sherlock Ohms

A Soldering Conundrum

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fire-iron.biz
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Gold
Re: Great Example
fire-iron.biz   6/20/2014 8:40:26 AM
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{{the best feedback can be obtained from the users itself and out of which the hardcore users who does virtually 95% of their day to day work on it.}}

 

Because we all know that fresh blood and clear eyes or ideas have such low value they should never be considered; yet there's an old aphorism, "He who enters a strange city and does not speak the language is the one who sees the city as it truly is."

 

Based on my experience with several different manufactuers, I call it the "Twenty Years Virus" because the answer to every "why" question is, "We've done it this way for twenty years." The Twenty Year Virus is extremely contageous and will quickly infect everyone from the production floor labor to the plant manager. Twenty Year Virus symptoms vary but typically include tolerance of decreased production and excessive product rejection rates. The biggest mistake individual departments and companies as a whole can make is devaluing or ignoring the reality-check that fresh blood and clear eyes can provide.

Mark

zeeglen
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Gold
Re: Nice Job
zeeglen   6/18/2014 8:32:23 PM
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@Nancy Some of the people signing off on it had no idea what the project was about - they were simply on the list of who had to sign off on an ECN for product engineeering.

Long ago someone from Production came to me with an ECN to sign.  Apparently there was no shipping box on the BOM for a product I had released to production about a year previous.  When someone finally noticed, as the design engineer I had to approve adding a "pizza box" to the BOM.  Sometimes rules and processes over-ride common sense...

Al Klu
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Gold
Re: Nice Job
Al Klu   6/18/2014 4:11:25 PM
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Good guess.  15 years in Quality Engineering, 13 now in Project.  The nitpicking you are alluding to is what we call "Inspecting to Reject" instead of "Inspecting to Accept".  This is the difference in figuring out what is important and what isn't. 

A typo in a sentence like that should not be stopped, but a typo in a callout for the type or method within a MIL spec can be critical.  I have Customers for major airframers who fall into the former category.  It's really difficult to understand how a 3000 page report gets rejected because of a formatting error that is non-technical.

Ah well.  Job security.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Nice Job
Nancy Golden   6/18/2014 3:45:03 PM
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I guess old habits never die although it hasn't been an issue lately - Great observation skills, Al - are you sure you aren't in QC? :)

While I applaud attention to detail and it certainly has its place, the fact that people have been hired for a certain level of expertise should be recognized - nitpicking wastes a lot of time and energy.

Al Klu
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Gold
Re: Nice Job
Al Klu   6/18/2014 3:37:15 PM
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Hi Nancy,

You have an extra "i" in "who" in the fourth sentence...Cool.  Where do I sign :).

But seriously, I guess there are people like this in every company.   Glad it's not just ours.

Cabe Atwell
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Blogger
Re: Great Example
Cabe Atwell   5/31/2014 12:24:36 AM
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I agree, way to work as a team! That seems so rare nowadays when it seems everyone is only out for themselves and shoving their coworkers under the bus.

a.saji
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Silver
Re: Great Example
a.saji   5/30/2014 6:00:15 AM
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@rsalkus: Yes take the opinion of the users and try to get them to be honest. Then only the issues and the improvements can be identified. 

a.saji
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Silver
Re: Great Example
a.saji   5/30/2014 5:52:52 AM
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Ali: Mate yes the best feedback can be obtained from the users itself and out of which the hardcore users who does virtually 95% of their day to day work on it. 

a2
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Gold
Re: Great Example
a2   5/30/2014 2:40:21 AM
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@Daniyel: You do have a point but when you are evaluating feedback, its always better to give preference to the ones who has a large number of experience on it. They are the ones have studied the system more than the others. 

Daniyal_Ali
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Great Example
Daniyal_Ali   5/29/2014 1:23:05 PM
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I agree rsalkus. We should always listen to the problems of the people directly involved in the work, as they have a vast experience of dealing with the things on daily basis and they can easily identify when there is a change in anything. This not only gives them confidence but also a sense of ownership, which ultimately leads to job satisfaction and hence more productivity.

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