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Sherlock Ohms

It's All in the Robot's Timing

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Rob Spiegel
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A silly millisecond slower
Rob Spiegel   10/11/2013 10:54:07 AM
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This is funny, Glenn. A fraction of a second is lost by the improvement. Gees, over a month, the cumulative loss is probably half a minute.

GTOlover
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Re: A silly millisecond slower
GTOlover   10/11/2013 1:36:33 PM
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Know what is even funnier Rob, look at the location and the project. I doubt a few milliseconds mattered compared to other time issues at this plant (if union know what I mean).

GlennA
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Gold
Re: A silly millisecond slower
GlennA   10/11/2013 9:11:24 PM
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Rob Spiegel;  I really don't think any time was lost.  The robot usually got back to the Cycle Start position at least a couple of seconds before the line was ready for the next floor pan.  So instead of waiting for 2 seconds, it may only wait for 1.7 seconds.  The robot with the hot servo motors also was usually back at the Cycle Start position a couple of seconds before the line indexing.  The issue there was to let the brakes hold the robot position after the robot was idle for 5 minutes, instead of keeping the servo motors on even if the robot is idle for several hours.

taimoortariq
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Greed gets to us
taimoortariq   10/13/2013 8:22:20 PM
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Being cautious and careful with the machinery is more important than just blindly maximizing the efficiency. More production although very important might be reckless and cause damage to the parts and the machine as well.

taimoortariq
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Re: A silly millisecond slower
taimoortariq   10/13/2013 8:53:35 PM
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That is pretty interesting. And it makes alot of sense as well, specially the solution where you proposed to use breaks in idle time. Pity sometimes people in higher management don't use their heads.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: A silly millisecond slower
Rob Spiegel   10/14/2013 8:35:42 AM
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I suppose that if you watch the milliseconds, the seconds will take care of themselves, but this is ridiculous.

RBedell
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Gold
Which efficiency
RBedell   10/14/2013 9:59:22 AM
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As pointed out already, a few milliseconds may not matter.  The answer would depend on: Is the line waiting on the robot or is the robot waiting on the line?  If the line is waiting on the robot then does a few milliseconds really matter?  But, if the robot is waiting on the line then a few milliseconds is irrelevant.  As engineers, we can sometimes let our designs integrate into our egos.  Possibly, the engineer rejected the suggestion because it would slow down the robots cycle time.  And the engineer was proud of that quick cycle time.  While the pan got dented, the line didn't shutdown because of it and the engineer could keep his cycle time (and ego).

An alternate view:  Only suggesting a solution may not work well.  In the end, the solution has to be evaluated as to the impact it will have on the situation.  The engineer would have to take the time to evaluate it.  But, providing the solution and how it might affect the situation gives the engineer more information to make a decision and saves him time.  If the robot was waiting on the line then; reporting that because the robot is waiting on the line for 'X' amount of time, the extra time allowed for reduced acceleration would not affect the line.  The engineer might have approved the solution or at least took a closer look.  In terms of ego, he could slow the acceleration and keep the line speed and few would know, thus preserving his ego.

RBedell
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Re: A silly millisecond slower
RBedell   10/14/2013 10:31:06 AM
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It may not be realistic to expect higher management to make good decisions for lower levels.  They see a different picture than the lower levels do.  Perhaps the lower levels should try to see things differently and explain solutions in a manner that higher levels would understand.  If the higher levels are focused on operations and cost then:  Using the brakes instead of the motors saves power and that save money.  It also saves money by reducing downtime, repair costs and restocking of spare parts.

The entire structure of business, design and production requires different views of the same goal.  Inter-communications between those views are not always easy nor simple.  Explaining in terms they understand but might seem erroneous to us.  One hint, the farther up management, the more money plays the role.

GlennA
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Gold
Do it right vs. do it over ?
GlennA   10/14/2013 10:54:36 AM
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The original complaint was that the robot was denting the floorpans.  Reducing the acceleration while carrying the floorpan prevented the denting.  If your choice was to transfer a floorpan in 15 seconds, or transfer a dented floorpan in 14.8 seconds, while overall cycle time does not change, which would you choose ?  Transfer time may be important, but aren't un-damaged parts and eliminating repairs and rework important too ?

Another point:  the engineer that 'investigated' the dented floorpans, and rejected the suggestion to reduce the acceleration, didn't notice when the problem was corrected.  Shouldn't he have noticed, and investigated why the problem went away ?

Ron C.
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Iron
Re: Which efficiency
Ron C.   10/14/2013 11:10:27 AM
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I wonder if this may also have been a case of how the change was presented. "I can fix the problem by lengthing the cycle time" as oposed to "I can solve the problem by shortening the wait time".

 

Same result but could be looked at very differently by management.

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