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Sherlock Ohms

It Takes a Good Vendor to Get a Good Outcome

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Rob Spiegel
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It takes a village
Rob Spiegel   10/8/2013 8:45:15 AM
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Nice story Jay. This is a good example of the importance of strong ties along the supply chain. For the vendor, this is customer relationship management as its best.

Nancy Golden
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Re: It takes a village
Nancy Golden   10/8/2013 12:54:34 PM
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Rob, I agree - I also enjoyed Jay's story and it reminded me of my old days working for Dallas Semiconductor (which had Mostek roots) and Optek Technology (who moved into the old Mostek building in Texas). One thing I would like to elaborate on - regarding the term vendor. I think Jay was so successful because he went directly to the manufacturer - he most likely spoke with the product engineer that was assigned that family of devices. The amount of testing and characterization product engineering is responsible for would give them details and information that would not necessarily show up on a spec sheet - like the story that Jay related. In industry parlance, the word vendor might also mean a third party distributor who might have a good basic knowledge of a device's functionality - but for the tricky questions, going to the manufacturer like Jay did is typically your best bet.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: It takes a village
Rob Spiegel   10/8/2013 1:16:57 PM
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Good point, Nancy. I know it can be tricky getting to the right person, especially if you're working through a distributor. I know one distributor that arranges three-way conversations that include the customer and the manufacturer in cases such as this one. That's good customer relations.

Nancy Golden
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Re: It takes a village
Nancy Golden   10/8/2013 1:31:05 PM
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Not only is it good customer relations, Rob - it also speaks to the value of developing good relationships with your vendors, regardless of where they fall in the supply chain. I consistently used one specific third party vendor over and over again because of their tremendous customer service. That made them look good to their primaries since we were buying lots and lots of test equipment with projects constantly in the queue. Not only that, it was obvious that the distributor and the manufacturer worked as a team - which really increased their effectiveness and as a result, mine as well.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: It takes a village
Rob Spiegel   10/8/2013 3:45:16 PM
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Good examples, Nancy. I've seen a number of distributor/manufacturer alliances that help both companies succeed. I've seen these alliances visit with key customers to demonstrate new technology and offer on-site training. This happens when the focus is on the needs of the customer. 

Mydesign
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Deliverables
Mydesign   10/9/2013 4:25:29 AM
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"This experience showed me that, when your own efforts to understand a problem and its environment aren't enough, reaching out for additional expertise without delay can make the difference between good outcomes and slow, costly ones. It also underscores the value of good relationships with good vendors."

Jay, you are absolutely right. Only good vendors can do deliver good outcomes. The basic thing is only good vendors are able to employee good technicians/ service/developers and hence their deliverables are also prompt with high quality/standards.

Mydesign
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Re: It takes a village
Mydesign   10/9/2013 4:29:04 AM
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"Not only is it good customer relations, Rob - it also speaks to the value of developing good relationships with your vendors, regardless of where they fall in the supply chain."

You are right Nancy. Without customers, there is no business, so by keeping this in mind business units has to establish good cordial relations with their customers. If customers are happy, they will refer more customers to their vendors. There is an old saying "Customer is the King'

Nancy Golden
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Re: It takes a village
Nancy Golden   10/9/2013 9:47:11 AM
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The problem with "There is an old saying "Customer is the King'" is that it is an old saying, Mydesign. That concept was drilled into us when I worked at Taco Plaza as a teenager. Unfortunately regarding retail and food service, that concept seldom holds true anymore. Customer service has gone down dramatically in many companies that I regarded as solid brands over the years. Retail shops are very complacent about providing any additional help.  50% of the time if you walk into a fast food restaurant, it will be difficult to find a clean table although the restaurant is practically empty.The level of care we grew up with simply does not exist. In industry however, this type of attitude can kill a company. I wonder if it is because niche vendors have more at stake customer service-wise, then retail markets where the consumers number in the millions...

Rob Spiegel
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Re: It takes a village
Rob Spiegel   10/9/2013 11:38:34 AM
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Nancy, talk about fast food customer service stories, I heard a good one about Ray Kroc when he ran MacDonald's. He was driving to a restaurant with a district manager and noticed that a fence right next to the restaurant had a bunch of wrappers and trash blown up against it. The district manager said, "I'll call that manager and ask that the trash be piclked up right now." Ray Kroc replied, "Tell the manager I'll be out there helping to pick up the trash." I would imagine trash never built up on that fence again as long as that manager was in charge.

chris.raymond@intusurg.com
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Iron
Other old memories with address quirks
chris.raymond@intusurg.com   10/9/2013 1:46:06 PM
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I think the old 2102 1K static RAMs had a related issue.  The Intel datasheet stated that CS* must be high during all address transitions.  Other vendors did not have this requirement.  Apparently there were dynamic nodes in the address path on the Intel parts.  So you could step through memory by holding CS* low and incrementing the address bus on all but the Intel parts.  Ah the good old days.

 

-Chris

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