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Sherlock Ohms

The Case of the Confused Customer

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Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: A similar problem
Nancy Golden   8/23/2013 11:19:40 PM
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Rob, I called tech support one time on a computer issue and it was obvious the person on the other line was reading from a script. The first question he asked was if my computer was plugged into the wall outlet. It must be more common than one would think...

Debera Harward
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Silver
Re: Incompatability
Debera Harward   8/23/2013 5:42:32 PM
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I also think that no insulator on the plugs were present or he himself has removed them by mistake.

270mag
User Rank
Iron
Re: Just a guess
270mag   8/23/2013 4:43:49 PM
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tekochip, That was the guy's problem. He actually couldn't plug it in, but didn't know why.

270mag
User Rank
Iron
Re: Incompatability
270mag   8/23/2013 4:40:19 PM
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In fact, the insulators are no longer provided.

GlennA
User Rank
Gold
End-user Qualifications
GlennA   8/23/2013 3:28:46 PM
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This reminds me of the story of the WordPerfect customer who called tech support because the 'words went away'.  During troubleshooting the customer wasn't able to check for loose connections - it was too dark because of the power failure.  The customer was advised to pack up and return the computer to the store where they bought it, with a note explaining that they 'were too f***ing stupid to use it'.

bob from maine
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Platinum
Incompatability
bob from maine   8/23/2013 12:26:19 PM
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It would seem that after getting a hammer and driving the insulated posts into the wall socket, the customer may also have been asking for renumeration for damage. Gotta wonder why the insulators were put on there in the first place.

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Just a guess
GTOlover   8/23/2013 10:35:23 AM
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The AC metal prongs are reverse polarity. They are insulators and not conductors. Must be the molders fault for putting the plastic on the outside!

I also noticed the other problem, Made in China!

Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
Home Automation
Jim_E   8/23/2013 9:59:02 AM
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Yeah, removing the plug insulator will definitely help the product work.  But, with it being X10, it probably won't work well anyways....   I was so gung-ho on X10 about ten years ago, but the stuff drove me crazy with how it would randomly freak out.  (Yes, I know about filters and the two 120V legs of the house wiring.)  Lights would magically stop responding at random times, then work well other times.  And the delay when pushing the button is so annoying!  I still have some X10 devices around that I use at Christmas time for the tree and decorations, but that's about it.

I want to try home automation again, but am waiting until prices come down for zigbee or insteon or other stuff.  It's almost cheaper to design and build the things myself as compared to what the things cost now!

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Just a guess
tekochip   8/23/2013 9:53:28 AM
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I can't believe he was able to plug the thing in.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A similar problem
Rob Spiegel   8/23/2013 9:49:10 AM
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That reminds me of the old computer service story where the new customer calls in to service, goes through a series of checks to see why the computer isn't working only for the service provider to discover the customer had not plugged the computer into the wall socket.

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