HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Made by Monkeys

Camcorder Needs a Good Smack

View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/4  >  >>
Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Another Smacking Tip
Nancy Golden   8/9/2012 7:17:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Hubby just told me about another smacking trick. If your car won't start, smack the starter with a hammer or a piece of wood - there is a good chance that it will reseat the brushes (its a DC motor) if the starter is bad and your car will start (maybe) (once)...worth a try...

BobDJr
User Rank
Gold
Re: Another Smacking Tip
BobDJr   8/10/2012 9:51:02 AM
NO RATINGS
Nancy, the starter thing comes up occasionally on Car Talk, and Tom & Ray give the same advice as your husband.  Then they usually tell the caller to go get it replaced.

(Years ago I was getting *so* frustrated trying to load a program from cassette onto my 48K 6502 computer (wink) that I picked it up about 2 feet & slammed it on the desk.  IIRC I had to replace 7 (socketed TTL) chips, so now when I get *that* mad I spike whatever screwdriver is handy.)

TomT
User Rank
Iron
Re: Feel good factor
TomT   8/10/2012 10:18:49 AM
NO RATINGS
I can relate to the "hit it with a hammer" solution. I worked for a large telecommunications company. We used to have carrier systems that used quartz filters. Sometimes the filters would grow "whiskers" that would short and fail a carrier channel.  The Labs guys recommended a procedure that removed the filter, place it on a 45 degree plane made of plywood, allow it to slide down the plane. The controlled impact would break the whiskers and make ithe filter operational. This was documented with drawings and detailed instructions.

The procedure followed the law of entropy as it was passed down by word of mouth. One technician found he could tap the installed filter with a rubber mallet and get the same result. It went further to the point of my finding a new junior tech standing on a ladder with a 22 oz ball peen hammer poundin on a bent steel frame "fixing a filter". He would up nearly destroying a complete bank of a dozen filters.

Everything goes downhill.....

 

Tom T.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Another Smacking Tip
Nancy Golden   8/10/2012 10:31:31 AM
NO RATINGS
BobDJr, those were the days...I recall my TI99/4A with its "state of the art casette recorder"...at least the chips on yours were socketed and not surface mount like today :)

I'll just remember to be ready to "duck" if I see you getting frustrated - the trajectory of a "spiked" screwdriver can be unpredictably if not aimed well - I can say that from experience ;)

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Feel good factor
Nancy Golden   8/10/2012 10:41:48 AM
NO RATINGS
TomT, that sounds like that game where everyone gets in a circle and the first person whispers something in the ear of the person next to them and so on. Once the message gets all the way around - it is completely different from the original. I guess that shows the importance of documentation, although you did mention an "official" procedure had already been documented. Any engineer worth his/her salt should be able to transfer the idea of a documented solution into another method if it makes sense, but it looks like junior wasn't grasping the concept - he was merely doing what he thought he had been told...

gafisher
User Rank
Gold
Know Where to Smack!
gafisher   8/10/2012 10:58:45 AM
As a former owner and Chief Engineer of a Sony Master Service Center I can assure you that the best procedure for dealing with a broken warrantied item is not taking it apart and trying to fix it yourself.  When something fails under warranty, don't smack the product -- go back to where you bought it and smack the salesperson's desk.

wbswenberg
User Rank
Gold
Re: Feel good factor
wbswenberg   8/10/2012 11:07:28 AM
NO RATINGS
My job at a local aerospace manufacturer included repooling mecury wetted relays.  Just had to smack it on the bench in the right direction.  Most times it worked.  If not then it was time to replace one of the relays.  Also repsitioning or resequencing the boards would help to identify just which one was bad.  The other thing I did was vacuum the ATE to the tune of $35/ hr.  What a job!

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Know Where to Smack!
Nancy Golden   8/10/2012 11:17:41 AM
NO RATINGS
gafisher - Smacking the salesperson's desk sounds pretty satisfying too...or the desk of the Sony rep who thought the problem was just an isolated incident...the problem is, these people are unreachable - the product was purchased at a Best Buy or some such store with an extended warranty added at the cash register.

sysdesign
User Rank
Iron
tried and true repair technique
sysdesign   8/10/2012 11:57:17 AM
NO RATINGS
Use to call it percussive repair.  Got to know where to pound, kick or slap though.  Lately it seems that dislocated shoulders are using same technique;-).

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Its not the Engineering as much as it IS the Market
Ann R. Thryft   8/10/2012 12:06:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Nancy, I think all TVs were like that in the 50s and 60s, and so were stereo systems (but not the record player!). Like you, I've been surprised, and disappointed, to see just how short consumer electronics lifecycles have become. The throwaway society does not encourage good consumer product or machine design, among other things.

<<  <  Page 2/4  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Made by Monkeys
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Nov 3 - 7, Engineering Principles behind Advanced User Interface Technologies
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service