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Which Switch Is Which?

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wbswenberg
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Gold
Poor Design
wbswenberg   2/14/2014 1:18:13 PM
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Yes, and some of the LEDs are not very good either.  My biggest beef is using ROMEX type wire and stablock outlets in clearly a mobil application.  No wonder many travel trailers catch on fire.  Solid wire is NOT appropriate for mobil applications even just for delivery.  Stablock connections are NOT appropriate for vibration locations.  That is why the light switch next to the garage door does not work.  The wire broke at the stablock.

For me it was the AC outlet to the refer in the camper.

I wish the FEDs would crack down on the use of solid wire.  I'm hoping for a class action sue against all producers that use solid wire.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Designed, possibly, but engineered? no way.
William K.   1/16/2014 3:42:08 PM
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L.M. is correct and the higher current rated switches are a bit larger in all dimensions. They fit the same description very well, but the ones that I used were a bit larger. So they possibly could have been utilized but not without a fair bit of effort. Until I came across the higher rated switches I had not bheen aware of their existance, since they are not very common. 

And amazinly enough, they are the same size as those in my travel trailer, which is a 1984 model that does not have much wear yet. 

What is interesting is that the switches that are not part of light fixtures are a much more "robust" looking rocker switch type. This trailer has no original switches in any 120 volt circuit.

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: WOW
Larry M   1/16/2014 11:48:46 AM
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Thanks! I've been at it for close to half a century. I seem to have learned at least a little during that time.

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Designed, possibly, but engineered? no way.
Larry M   1/16/2014 11:45:49 AM
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William K. wrote: "And I did do some more research, and it happens that some slide switches are made for a lot more current, up to 3.5 amps, if you believe the manufacturers rating. So some switches may not be over rated, you would need to read the printing on the switch."

Fit is an issue. The switch is the standard one with a housing made from U-channel aluminum sheet. The slider is rectangular bakelite with serrations on the top surface. The U-channel prongs crimp a piece of fiber-board to the tips of the U. That board holds the contacts. The base of the U extends beyond the sides to form semi-circular lugs at each end,

In this fixture, the switch fits over two plastic prongs which go through lugs in the switch. A snap-on cover holds the switch down and covers the bakelite slider with a larger handle surface. You can't even see the internal switch until you take the unit apart.

The goal here was to find a dimensionally-equivalent switch with a higher DC current rating, I couldn't find one sold in consumer quantities with a 3.5 amp rating.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Scorched lens
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   1/16/2014 12:04:25 AM
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Your detailed electrical analysis of the common lighting fixture design flaw in a Girlfriends trailer makes me think of Leonard Hofstadter fixing something for (knock,knock,knock) Penny (knock,knock,knock) Penny (knock,knock,knock) Penny!

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: WOW
Cadman-LT   1/13/2014 7:55:29 AM
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I liked your solution with the LEDs.You seem very good at this. 

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
WOW
Cadman-LT   1/13/2014 7:50:54 AM
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You really know your lighting man.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Designed, possibly, but engineered? no way.
bobjengr   1/11/2014 6:02:04 PM
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 I agree TJ.  Not just component costs but the cost of retooling to accommodate a different type of switch.  The appliance industry has this situation every year; upgrade and retool or simply change the appearance.  Generally, a domestic product will survive for about 18 to 24 months then a new appearance is needed.  For retooling, it's about 3 years.  I do think COST IS KING for residential products.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Designed, possibly, but engineered? no way.
William K.   1/10/2014 12:23:17 PM
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TJM, in some cases price is NOT the primary consideration. In some instances the primary target is performance, and in some others it is durability or reliability. I don't use the word "quality" as much as I used to because I have found that a lot of people have attached an entirely different meaning to it. Somehow the term quality has become a term for the number of features that an item posesses, not related to the length of time it caan be expected to remain functional. 

 

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Designed, possibly, but engineered? no way.
TJ McDermott   1/9/2014 11:09:01 PM
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WilliamK, you could make the sweeping statement that price is always the #1 qualifier.

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