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This Lube Job Takes a Contortionist

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wbswenberg
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Platinum
Grease Fittings and Metric Fasteners
wbswenberg   12/31/2013 9:33:09 PM
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My 1929 Ford Tudor has 25 grease fittings.  24 have been changed to zerks.  I have grease guns for marine, disk breaks (covers everything else like steering and driveline also) and snowmobile.  The original fittings look to me like a portal straight into the bearing.  I'm collecting original tools provided with the car from Ford.  And have an adapter for the gun to modern zerks.  In my tool bag I planned on only SAE tools.  Guess again, the heads of a some bolts and nuts are either worn or non-standard original 1929.  So I have a metric set to get a tight fit.  Ford did make their own fasteners.

I'm re-assembling my 350 cid for my 1995 K2500 from left side partial rebuild.  There are metric and SAE fasteners all over to no rhyme or reason.  What a pain where I sit.

I think there are 45 degree zerks also.  I have a flexible hose on the gun I use the most.  However, sometimes its hard to hold the hose on and force the grease in.  Gads that molybedenum disulfide grease is sticky nasty black stuff.

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Haven't seen a grease fitting in years
Larry M   12/31/2013 6:12:00 PM
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a.saji wrote: "@Larry: I don't think there are any grease fittings around any more."

But there are. I am writing about GM 2006 models. I expect the 2014 models are no different.

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Haven't seen a grease fitting in years
Larry M   12/31/2013 6:10:16 PM
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a.saji wrote: "@Larry: 1st 2 points are very clear and informative. Not clear about your 3rd point though. Why do you feel like that ?"

Well, the tie rod ends and ball joints on a 2000 pound Toyota are nearly the same size as those on a 6000 pound Yukon Denali XL. The heavier vehicle is more likely to extrude the factory-applied grease out of the bearing surfaces than the lightweight vehicle. I have no measurements to justify this opinion. Maybe some of the people with auto-industry experience can weigh in. (pun intended)

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: My vote is cost
William K.   12/31/2013 5:40:16 PM
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Cooky, my experience is that the grooves get worn in the disk as the caliper locks due to rust. Right now on my PT Cruiser all of the disks have uneven wear, inside to outside, because the sliding parts have locked up a bit. So when the ice and snow melt in a few months there will be another project to do. Would I ever let the dealer work on them? No way, since they would simply replace everything and charge $125 for twenty minutes labor, and about $450 for parts. The dealers are both greedy and very expensive, and they never repair things, only replace things. AND ANYBODY can be a parts changer.

cookiejar
User Rank
Gold
Re: My vote is cost
cookiejar   12/31/2013 5:10:20 PM
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The wear of caliper castings by brake-pad backing plates is an example of car manufacturers deliberately helping out their parts profit center.

There are two ways to mount a caliper. 

One is on the front side of the axle, the other on the rear side of the axle.  Mounting it on top is sitting on the fence.  

If it is mounted on the REAR side of the axle, the rubbing of the brake pad against the rotor due to rotor throwout will tend to raise the pad and drop it for each rotation of the wheel.  This hammering will wear a groove in the caliper casting - lots of caliper sales.
Mounting the caliper on the FRONT side of the axle will cause the rotor rubbing action to merely seat the pad on its stop - problem solved.

It is no surprise to me that mounting the caliper towards the rear of the axle is by far the more common.  All the vehicles I've had using this design have suffered from grooves worn in the calipers.  All the vehicles I've had with calipers mounted at the front of the axle have been trouble free in this regard.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Metric fittings...
William K.   12/31/2013 4:33:46 PM
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Bob, you are right about the engine assemblies. In many GM products the entire front driv package is built up and then attached to the body about half way down the assembly line. I am particularly aware of that because at one time my responsibilty was the electrical testers that verified that everything was in place and connected. The electrically heated oxygen sensors were especially critical since if the ceramic cracked the test would fail, and the replacement took over an hour each, on the brand new vehicle. It seems that they were not accessible from any direction. So it seems that "design for serviceability" is a concept foreign to our automakers. Everything is "design for assembly", and whom cares about ever fixing it. Just about the same attitude as a whole lot of consumer junk these days.

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: My vote is cost
Amclaussen   12/31/2013 4:21:25 PM
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And it is not only Chrysler: My wife's new VW Jetta also has the brake pads backing plates supported and rubbing on either the caliper support or on the "rail" cast together with the steering knuckle... and, as Murphy would have said: the steel backing plates are harder than the soft cast iron, therefore the backing plate wears away the cast iron, leaving a groove with squared step like sides, that tend to catch the backing plate and impede the free retraction of the pads.

My solution was to take a large flat file and restore the flatness, requiring to remove about 50 mils.  The assembly now has a little forward-backward play, but the pads now slide freely.  It is my impression that this contact points demand relatively frequent relubrication, obviously using the special high temperature grease, of course.  The correct solution would involve the use of harder inserts, but as always, the ultraintelligent bean counters found omitting them would save a couple of pennies and there we have it that way.

cookiejar
User Rank
Gold
replacement parts have grease fitttings
cookiejar   12/31/2013 1:11:56 PM
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It has been my experience through the years that replacement ball joints, tie-rod ends and U joints all come with grease fittings.  The replacement joints, when greased, easily outlast the OEM sealed joints.

When pumping grease into a fitting until the rubber seal bulges, as is recommended, I've often wondered where the old grease has gone.  If you accidentally pump until the grease goes out past the seal, you will often see water coming out.  The water can't be good for the joint.

cookiejar
User Rank
Gold
grease gun fittings
cookiejar   12/31/2013 1:01:14 PM
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There are fittings available for the end of your grease gun that inject at right angles to its line.  It seems that's what GM dealers and many grease shops use.

a.saji
User Rank
Silver
Re: Haven't seen a grease fitting in years
a.saji   12/31/2013 10:20:58 AM
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@Larry: I don't think there are any grease fittings around any more.           

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