HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Made by Monkeys

Where Rubber (& Oil) Meet the Road

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Threaded|Newest First|Oldest First
naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
The high end car?
naperlou   10/9/2013 9:10:17 AM
NO RATINGS
Ray, I thought the Lexus was their high end vehicle line.  This does not sound high end.  The fact that a metal part was needed in this application is suprising.  I am not sure that you won't have problems with this setup in the future as well.  The fact that the EMS did not light up the oil light is very troubling.  Even old, non-electronic, cars could do that fairly reliably.  On top of that, the fact that there was no recall or notice from Lexus is just the icing on the cake.  This is a quality problem caused by design.  Shame!

TunaFish#5
User Rank
Gold
Re: The high end car?
TunaFish#5   10/9/2013 9:47:07 AM
NO RATINGS
"word," naperlou.  Multifactor failure.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Ann R. Thryft   10/9/2013 1:10:09 PM
NO RATINGS
High-end, schmigh-end. I've heard similar stories about so-called luxury cars, Lexus especially. One of the reasons I don't buy them. I agree with Lou--shame!



Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Rob Spiegel   10/9/2013 4:40:11 PM
NO RATINGS
That's pretty good, Ann. The engineers for the luxury models are not a different breed than the engineers on the rest of the company's vehicles.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Ann R. Thryft   10/10/2013 12:34:51 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob, that's what I thought--that the engineers, or at least the engineering, wouldn't be different between mid-range and high-end cars. You'd think the QA would be even tighter. Once upon a time, more expensive meant higher quality.



GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The high end car?
GTOlover   10/10/2013 1:31:38 PM
NO RATINGS
I can testify that Ford and Mercury (before they were shutdown) had the same engineers, but different program managers and quality assurance people. For example, a simple plastic door panel was made from the exact same tool. The only design difference was the molded in part number and the ID badge. However, the Mercury parts had tighter tolerances than the Ford part. Thus, the tool and process was optimized to meet the Mercury requirements. Ford parts ended up being exactly the same. It would be interesting to know if the low end car using this chassis and engine combo was also a rubber hose?

Now as to the oil light, I have to agree with Lou. My 1968 has the 'oil' idiot light. That means when the oil pressure falls below a specified pressure, the light illuminates. Knowledgable people immediately shutdown the engine! The fact the Lexus was knocking meant the oil pressure was low and a light should of illuminated. It seems someone decided a level sensor is good enough, even though level sensors can become coated or stuck. The designer should of had an oil pressure switch as well as level indicator!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Rob Spiegel   10/10/2013 4:40:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, in some areas such as engineering and probably quality control, the investment is likely the same. These disciplines are part of overhead and are not tied to individual products. I would guess that (as an example) Ford's engineering and QC on the Focus is the same as on the Lincoln. 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Ann R. Thryft   10/10/2013 5:28:52 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob, unless I read this wrong, the problem with this Lexus was a completely wrong part installed (and presumably spec'd) for the function it has to perform: rubber hose instead of metal pipe. So doesn't that imply truly stupid design? And if that's happening on Lexus, then is it also happening with the *same* parts on Toyotas? Or did I miss your meaning?

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The high end car?
Dave Palmer   10/10/2013 7:18:41 PM
NO RATINGS
@Ann: Judging by this press release, it looks like this issue affected Toyota RAV4's, Avalons, and Camrys, as well as Lexus ES350's and RS350's.

There were actually two steel oil lines, joined together with a short length of rubber hose, as shown in this picture.  I'm guessing that the rubber union was used for ease of assembly.  On one level, it's a smart design, because it's much more tolerant of dimensional variation in the assembly.  The Achilles' heel in this design was the failure to select a rubber that could withstand hot engine oil. 

Again, I'm just guessing here, but I suspect that the decision to go to an all-steel construction, rather than just replacing the rubber hose with one made from a better grade of rubber, was based partly on cost (one long steel oil line is almost certainly cheaper than two short steel oil lines plus a rubber union).  Also, going to an all-steel construction meant that engines that have received the repair could be easily visually identified.  I think a rubber hose could have worked in this application, provided that it was the right kind of rubber.

As a materials engineer, maybe I'm biased, but this seems like yet another lesson on the importance of appropriate materials selection.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Ann R. Thryft   10/11/2013 12:12:19 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, Dave, for that info. From the description in the Monkeys post, it sounded like this was such a complete mismatch between material and performance requirements that it must have affected other models, too. What's so silly is that plastics--I don't know about rubber--have been used in fuel line apps for some time now. That's what the Nylon 12 shortage was mostly about. I completely agree with you about materials selection. It still boggles me that with all the great stuff available it's possible to pick the wrong one.

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The high end car?
Amclaussen   11/6/2013 5:37:15 PM
Dave:

Thanks to the picture that you linked, I can see that the design used some kind of "banjo" style end fittings that use soft metal washers to seal the fluid. It is the same arrengement used in brake lines to attach the lines to the cylinder in the wheel. In that design, a lot of stress and vibration is taken by the hollow bolt, therefore a little longer tubing run with curves shoud take care of any dimensional tolerances, avoiding the flexible rubber section altogether.

But using so called "constant tension" hose clamps is placing a weak link in the chain!

This part should have used crimped style attachements between the metal line and the hose ends.

Still bad design!

The "engineers" (monkey-eers should be more appropriate) still need to go back to school...

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The high end car?
William K.   11/6/2013 8:57:58 PM
NO RATINGS
Those single wrap constant spring force clamps are a poor design choice for any application where reliability matters. Of course, sometimes they do work out, but that is mostly pure luck. I have even had one of them simply break into pieces across the axis of the wire, in an almost new car. I replaced the broken clamp with a stainless screw clamp and never had any problems. But I can see that while the constant tension clamp retails for about 4 cents, the screw clamp was about 75 cents at the time. But I would be happy to add a few dollars to the car price if that money went to purchase reliable parts instead of the cheapest possible parts. Tha connection was the upper radiator hose to the engine block. Sort of important by any standards.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Rob Spiegel   10/11/2013 1:46:18 AM
NO RATINGS
I would agree with that, Ann. Ordinarily, Toyota has decent engineering and quality control. This flaw is a bit of a surprise. I think the point I was trying to make is that there is probably not a layer of higher quality engineering or quality control for the more expensive line.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Ann R. Thryft   10/11/2013 12:14:13 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the clarification, Rob. If there isn't a layer of higher quality control and engineering for the more expensive line, and most of the components are the same, it seems like one heck of a waste of money.

Chartrain
User Rank
Iron
Re: The high end car?
Chartrain   10/12/2013 5:12:05 PM
High end = high marketing effort and hig $$$ not necessarily high quality.

Common componnets aren't even manufactured by the parent company and your luxury vehicle could be sharing the same part with a domestic econo box.

I was a big fan and charter member of the Lincoln LS club. It was an excellent car with an indendent rear suspension and handled like a BMW.

The rear window regulators were prone to failure and when we discussed with the Lincoln engineers they said it was the same part number used by Mercedes from a 3rd party supplier.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Rob Spiegel   10/14/2013 8:28:24 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm probably wrong that the engineering and quality control teams for luxury cars are the same as with the lower-cost lines. It's a guess, I'll try to find out whether there is a higher quality team for the more expensive cars.

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The high end car?
GTOlover   10/14/2013 2:19:41 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob, I am not sure of the Lexus brand, but the GM and Ford brand the engineers and quality people are seperated by the divisions. Ford and Licoln had different engineers. I am not sure who designed the base vehicle chassis, but the differences of the two brands are engineered by seperate teams. Cadillac engineers were very meticulous about the fit and function of their parts and the Cheverolet engineers were more concerned about quality at rate (meaning does the part assemble correctly on the assembly line).

Somehow, I think that Lexus probably has a similar engineering and quality structure, but the Japanese do things their way.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Rob Spiegel   10/14/2013 3:00:39 PM
NO RATINGS
That explains a lot, GTOlover. I would guess part of the differentiation in a luxury vehicle would be superior engineering.

Turbineman
User Rank
Gold
Re: The high end car?
Turbineman   10/10/2013 11:04:13 AM
I agree Ann.  Many "Luxury" auto's are simply re-branded mid-level models in auto makers' lineups.  Toyota is no exception.  My 2000 Camry XLE has the same exterior and interior as the 2000 Lexus E300, down to the wood trim accents and leather.  The third party DIY repair manuals say they cover both models.

IMHO Toyota made their best cars between 1998 and 2001, and have since gone downhill.  They're probably not alone on this.  Again, my opinion.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The high end car?
Ann R. Thryft   10/10/2013 12:37:28 PM
NO RATINGS
Turbineman, that's an interesting set of facts, and reinforces what Rob and were discussing. Even if the same engineers aren't designing both cars, the parts are engineered the same--in fact identically it seems. Which begs the question--what the heck *is* the difference that demands such a difference in price tag?

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The high end car?
Amclaussen   11/6/2013 3:05:03 PM
NO RATINGS
I believe you are absolutely right Turbineman!

I too believe the best designs and executions were about 15 to 20 years ago.  After that, excess greed from managers, lack of truly experienced and accomplished engineers to replace the old ones retiring, and an abuse of CAD design tools have actually downgraded the automotive industry, producing cars that are very nice to own the first 3 or 4 years, but become a nightmare to maintain after that...  And there were absolute goofes too in all these years since the 90's. I have two cars of the exact same category, one is an old 1991 and that model was produced from 1990 to 1995, the other is a 2002 that was produced from 2001 to 2006. Same brand, same type.  The 1991 is a pleasure to repair and maintain, having reasonable space (with a few tight corners), and a fine overall execution. The 2002 is a nightmare to fix, having a lot of misplaced or stupidly placed components that require dropping the engine to perform some repairs and maintenance. For example, a complete radiator service is a matter of 3 to 4 hours working at a nice and calm pace. in the 1991 model... but requires a complete front fascia removal and a lot of disassembly in the 2002 model, which is designed just to be quickly assembled at the factory, but with a complete disrespect for the poor soul that is charged with any repair job on it.

 What happened? Chrysler went down by the greedy and "everybody for himself" attitude of its former managers, and then came those over-brilliant german administrators from Daimler that completed the company destruction! In the case in turn, even the hottest part of the lube oil circuit (the line from engine to oil cooler) is perfectly able to withstand the hot oil if the rubber spec and hose construction is respected... but, watch out for those stupid young "engineers" (that vilify the profession) that placed that hose in overly cramped spaces, without ANY respect for radiation heat impinging on the rubber and /or placing undue torsion or excessively short bending radiuses, just because the AutoCad shows 'no-problem'!!! (until CAD software programmers learn to hold a wrench in their hands, and put that elementary knowledge into their product, we can expect a lot more failures like these). Amclaussen.

TexasTJ
User Rank
Iron
Re: The high end car?
TexasTJ   10/10/2013 8:30:45 AM
NO RATINGS
I fear we'll be reading an update soon about a failed RX350 engine.  If you've lost enough oil that the engine is "rattling", something very bad is happening to the engine internals.  Were they hearing piston slap, rods knocking, who knows?  But whatever the source, it's never good!

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The high end car?
GTOlover   10/10/2013 1:36:11 PM
NO RATINGS
I ran a chevy 350 CID low on oil at 150k. I thought I toasted the motor. Filled it up, checked the oil often (as it now smoked at start-up), and got 250k out of it before the rust won on the body! So this motor may survive, but will now need TLC the rest of its life.

Chartrain
User Rank
Iron
Re: The high end car?
Chartrain   10/12/2013 3:52:02 PM
NO RATINGS
The noise I heard was lifters rattling. Accelerating made them clatter (oil starvation) while backing off the engine would quiet down. Mind you this was all in less than 30 seconds so I'm sure the damage if any,was minimal.

In the 70's back in the frozen tundra of Canada, I slid my 74 Torino off the road requiring a tow truck to extract me. Unbeknownst at the time, the oil pressure sensor has been smashed by some ice jammed into that part of the engine. I drove approximately 30 miles  at 65 mph with liitle to no oil and only discovered it when I pulled into a toll booth and rolled down my window and heard the crank clunking.

Being sub zero and some miles from the nearest town, my illogical reasoning said that of it ran this far, what was another 5 miles. I drove to a service station (remember those?) where the pressure switch was replaced, the engine topped up with oil and I drove the car for several more years before like it cousins of the 70's it fell apart from rust.

The oil light never came on in that instance either.

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: The high end car?
far911   10/30/2013 12:41:48 AM
NO RATINGS
It is really alarming for the TOYOTA Co. as these kind of issues can take there market away for Good and at the same time bringing lot of inconvenience to the

users.

kmeagher
User Rank
Iron
Re: The high end car?
kmeagher   11/5/2013 6:09:27 PM
NO RATINGS
I have found that this is standard fare for Toyota.  Many issues are brushed under the table and no recall is issued.  Frame rot recall doesn't cover $6,000 worth of parts removed in the repair. ABS/Traction Control that randomly kick in at any speed while traveling in a straigh line.  Ball joints that fail on almost all models.

The 1st bullet on the right of the NHTSA recall site is "Toyota Recalls and Investigations"

http://www.nhtsa.gov/Vehicle+Safety/Recalls+&+Defects

Sorry about high jacking the thread...

-Kevin

 

http://www.nhtsa.gov/Vehicle+Safety/Recalls+&+Defects

rgarthwaite
User Rank
Iron
warning lights
rgarthwaite   10/10/2013 5:50:04 AM
NO RATINGS
Sounds like you saved the car by applying common sense!  I doubt the manufacturer anticipated such an action.

The light is designed to illuminate when the engine is totally destroyed, I believe.  It's a sort of "return auto to dealer now" concept. Keeps the assembly lines rolling along.  A sort of "designed failure" idea.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: warning lights
William K.   10/10/2013 2:41:42 PM
At least on my cars the oil light has served as a very effective stall indicator, since the oil pressure drops rapidly when the engine stops rotating. And on several vehicls that had alots of miles, the light would come on at slow idle when the oil,viscosity was excessively low. But those were not expensive luxury cars by any stretch. Probably the oil light in a Lexus is intended to never illuminate, since that would indicate a flaw in the Jap engineering. And admitting to any problem would damage their egos.

Critic
User Rank
Platinum
Re: warning lights
Critic   10/28/2013 10:59:15 AM
NO RATINGS
"Probably the oil light in a Lexus is intended to never illuminate, since that would indicate a flaw in the Jap engineering. And admitting to any problem would damage their egos."  Yep, I believe this is accurate.

Fibber
User Rank
Iron
Re: warning lights
Fibber   10/30/2013 8:15:12 AM
NO RATINGS
Also worth mentioning is the question about the lack of a warning light, and some ensuing comments (some displaying extreme ignorance & racial bias).  

Remember that the light on your dash is likely an Oil Pressure indicator, and NOT an electronic dip stick.  Oil level indicators are extremely rare, and without a dry sump are unlikely to work when the engine is running.  Almost all modern cars rely on a dumb sensor, typically set to illuminate a dash light if the pressure drops below absolute minimum (likely set point of less than 10 psi – the minimum pressure at idle).  But if your engine is turning 3k RPM under load it needs 40-50 psi for long term survival.  So what happens as you leak out oil?  The slosh in the pan allows air to be sucked in, dropping pressure and starving critical components like variable valve timing actuators.  Metal-on-metal contact begins, with accelerated wear.  You'll never get a dash light as the net average pressure might still be 20 psi right up until the time it suddenly drops to zero, but by then the damage is done......

I could get on my soap box and tell you we need REAL mechanical dash gauges, but would the average driver even know how to interpret the data?

erikmorton
User Rank
Iron
The Black Lemon
erikmorton   10/10/2013 10:51:37 AM
Lexus isn't the only "High End" make out there with engine issues swept under the carpet. The venerable M54 six cylinder in my '02 BMW has fallen prey to a poor oil separator design. Between two snow storms in the Mid Atlantic I chose to drive it instead of my IH Scout. The engine was running about 10 minutes when it started exhausting black smoke. Taking the girls to school I didn't notice until the engine locked up while I was trying to get around a front end loader moving snow. It actually sucked enough oil from its crankcase into the intake and hydrolocked the engine with only 88k miles. That engine was restored but subsequently failed at 110k. And BMW knows this was a problem for their engines in a cold climate. They are quick to replace/upgrade the oil separator if a customer indicates it's running roughly in cold weather. But if you tear into an engine 40 miles from the dealer only to realize the problem is a design flaw that is being actively ignored. You are likely out of luck. They did offer to look at it for me if I brought it to the dealer. Really? the car is on my mechanic's lift with the engine largely disassembled. And you may help me if I bring it to you. Not likely.

If car companies didn't worry so much about their image being tarnished by this sort of issue and allowed us to fix them correctly we would actually be able to get the miles out of these cars we expect. Now I have a worthless BMW convertible with a used engine.

Erik

Critic
User Rank
Platinum
Any Warning?
Critic   10/28/2013 11:26:16 AM
NO RATINGS
I am curious to know whether there were any warning signs that the oil hose was going to fail.  Was it leaking, cracked, or bulging? 

I realize that many people don't crawl under their cars, and another category of people don't understand preventive maintenance.  Often (not always) hose failures can be predicted just by looking at them.  Also, it is a good practice to replace hoses periodically, even if they don't appear to be bad!

I am guessing that this low-oil-pressure incident could have been avoided if the car had excellent periodic inspection/maintenance.  This is just another viewpoint- I realize it is not a popular one- the car owner doesn't want to blame himself for lousy maintenance, so he blames the manufacturer for poor design.

Why don't manufacturers make cars that never require maintenance and never fail?  Would any of you bloggers like to answer this?

 

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Any Warning?
William K.   10/28/2013 1:00:15 PM
NO RATINGS
Critic: why they don't make cars that never fail is easy to answer, which is that they wouod cost a whole lot more. Just conside military equipmet for tactical,(battle) operations. When many lives depend on perfect functioning the cost equation changes a bit. ON my car, the failure of almost any component results in it not driving quite right or in some convenience featuyre not working, none of which are life threatening.

So if you really want a forever vehicle go purchase a military spec Jeep. Not one of the "wanabe's, but the real thing. Aside from belts and tires it will last until long after you are quite tired of it. But it will cost a lot to purchase.

OR, you could become a higher level manager type at an auto company and drive a vehicle that gets preventive maintenance every workday. Then you will never experience any of the problems that the rest of us have.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Any Warning?
William K.   10/28/2013 8:13:08 PM
One other thing is that I don't recall in any of my cars having any hoses in any lubrication oil lines. The closest was in a transmission cooler line. 

My opinion is that having a hose in any critical lubrication line is very poor engineering, at best, and terribly negligent as well. We KNOW that the hose will fail eventually so why would they use it? All reputable automakers use steel tubing if they need to run lubrication oil outside of the engine block. The aftermarket oil coolers are a different story and even there, if they are of a decent quality that line is very durable, with steel braid under the jacket, not cloth braid.

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Any Warning?
Amclaussen   11/6/2013 4:36:14 PM
NO RATINGS
I absolutely agree with your reasoning William K.

The only hose lines in my cars are those carrying transmission fluid to the cooler (air type) and back to the tranny; and two small ones carrying coolant to the base of the oil filter, that is an oil cooler.  But the lubricating oil never gets out of the block... therefore you can count that one as plain bad design!

And for the owner paying a premium price for a metal line, any half decent repair shop could have made that line at a fraction of the cost.  Should it have happened to me, I would happily go to a Sears and bought a brake line bender to make the lines all by myself.  Believing the car maker dealer or "authorized" shop has to be any better, is to perpetuate the myth that they somehow are the only ones capable of fixing it, which is why they put their outrageous prices on every small repair and charge large sums for parts that have nothing special about.

Chartrain
User Rank
Iron
Re: Any Warning?
Chartrain   10/30/2013 9:26:25 AM
NO RATINGS
Crawling under the vehicle would not have prevented the incident. The oil cooler as is most of the engine, covered by a plastic belly pan. There was no oil leaking and nothing to see. The hose ruptured. Once removed if you squeezed it you could see fatigue cracks but not on the surface, only when squeezing it. Unless you took a shop manual and studied every part on the engine ( and even then you might not realize) the hoses are rubber. Another post mentioned another rubber hose on the back of the head that I wasn't aware of. Your global statement on crawling under to have a look & inspect is silly on a modern car as you can't see most of what's under the hood much less inspect it.

Fibber
User Rank
Iron
Classic case of Materials Science gone bad?
Fibber   10/29/2013 9:04:37 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm sorry to hear that yet another Toyota customer had to deal with this.  As an engineer and volunteer moderator on a Toyota enthusiast site, I've helped a number of other members thru this issue.  No doubt your Lexus has the 2GR-FE V6 engine, and that motor uses rubber oil hoses in two instances: for the rear head VVTi feed and for the external accessory oil cooler.  There was a recall for the upper hose (LSC-90K), but only a tech service bulletin (TSB-0201-11) for the cooler. 

Full metal lines are generally best, although the accordion-fold replacement lines can still be subject to fatigue failure.  In my opinion, it's not the use of rubber lines that's the prime issue, but the wrong selection of rubber compound.  The hoses don't burst from pressure, they appear to melt! In a piece I wrote a year ago, I noted that the original lines were marked ACM which is Polyacrylate.  It's OK for clean oil, but may have sensitivity to contaminates found as oil ages (corrosive blow-by).  The newer hoses are marked ACM FKM, or fluorinated rubber (Viton?) which should be much more chemical resistant.  

So yes, Monkeys chose the wrong material for the job!

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Classic case of Materials Science gone bad? or still bad design??
Amclaussen   11/6/2013 5:18:42 PM
As william K. correctly points out, there should not be ANY oil line exiting the block, as lubrication is critical for engine integrity.

This appears to be a classic case where the design engineer forgot How to lay out the lubrication galleries inside the block on time, or where the engine was designed without a given feature, and then they added that oil-using accesory or device, and they simply decided to run a hose to avoid to fix it in a proper way.  The "quick and dirty way to fix things".

On the other side, having to resort to 'above the standard' hose material, when dealing with hot engine oil carried inside a hose reveals a very shortsighted approach to powertrain design. This is not an auxiliary service running an innofensive or "benign" fluid, it is hot, internal combustion lube oil, full of contaminants, water from combustion, metals and oil degradation subproducts!  Hoping that a "better than usual" hose material will solve the problem and meet the service is just naive, and an invitation for disaster (I could imagine a large oil puddle on the road, ready to provoque a serious accident to others). The two choices of "superior" hose materials mentiones undoubtely have better chemical resistance but, can those materials meet mechanical resistance, tearing resistance etc adequately? (some "above plain rubber" materials do not have all these properties, so a change needs to be well researched. the fact that they first tried Poly Acrilate, and then Viton shows that they didn't do it correctly for once and all.

Attempting to "solve" (or get around) the problem by using "accordion-fold replacement lines" is inexcusable too.

This is exactly the kind of Monkey-ish design that plagues today's automotive designs, and tells me that those over-brilliant designers should be sent way back to school (and I mean, elementary school!).

Partner Zone
More Blogs from Made by Monkeys
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service