HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Made by Monkeys

This Dishwasher Isn't Waterproof

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/3  >  >>
Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Failure Prone Electronics
Cabe Atwell   10/23/2013 6:16:51 PM
NO RATINGS
It's always a safe bet to research products online before spending your hard-earned dollars on something and having it fail only a short time later. 

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Failure Prone Electronics
Cadman-LT   9/8/2013 3:35:29 AM
NO RATINGS
Charles, never heard it put that way before "planned obsolescence", but it does seem to be rampant. Make it stylish if that's what sells, but don't lose functionality or reliability for it.

 Planned obsolescene seems to infer that they actually skimp on certain parts to guarantee failure after a certain amount of usage or time. I agree that it happens, but what a way do things. Geez. 

Keldawwg
User Rank
Gold
Re: Dishwasher design
Keldawwg   9/6/2013 3:26:36 PM
NO RATINGS
Miele makes a great dishwasher... I've had mine for over 15 years, and it has yet to have it's first problem... Not cheap by any means, but how much are you saving if the one you buy only lasts 3 to 5 years? Not to mention the hassle of installing a new dishwasher every 3 to 5 years... Seriously?

The Miele has double-walled hoses throughout, and a shut off valve that will shut the water off coming in to the dishwasher if any leak is detected. I bought it to replace a GE Profile that flooded my kitchen... Pile-O-Crap...

It is just so much more intelligently designed... It's like when you are working on a Mercedes, and something does not come apart the way you expected it to. Very frustrating, but when you understand how and why they did it that way, it's always because this is the better way to do it... The Miele is exactly like that...

I hate Whirlpool more than I hate Chrysler, and that's saying something...

J. Williams
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Back to the Knob
J. Williams   9/5/2013 6:09:01 PM
NO RATINGS
Yeah, I wished I never let my old(er) dial, clock-motor cam switch assembly Kitchenaid dishwasher go with my last house.  That was back in the early nineties before Whirlpool bought the Kitchenaid brand and ruined it.  That "old" Kitchenaid had a sturdy enameled steel tub and the door closed like a Volvo.  It actually cleaned dirty dishes.  No rinsing necessary.

In our latest house, we bought a "high-end" Maytag dishwasher for nearly $900 about 15 or 16 years ago.  What a P.O.S.  (Whirlpool, the Great Satan of the appliance industry destroyed the Maytag brand too, the astards-bay.  We're still using pre-Whirlpool washer and dryer set from Maytag that we bought in 1989 and raised four children on them.)

The door is almost completely plastic and closes with all the satisfaction of a Little Tikes Cozy Coupe door.  Within a year, the main control board failed. About a year or two later I had to replace the membrane switch on top of the door panel. 

The plastic piece of scheisse door latch handle just broke off.  Fortunately it still latches by pushing the door shut and you can just pull it open (some type of detent).  Just recently, I noticed a lot of crud sticking to the dishes after it was done.  I found the filter media on the pump housing has ripped or become un-bonded so the water is not being cleaned as it is circulated through the pump.  I wonder how much I'll have to pay for that part?  You have to buy the whole housing because it is all glued together.  GRrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. 

And now only about three of the eight friggin buttons on the same P.O.S. membrane switch actually work.  As for the adjustable racks, I had to make them fixed because the water port flappers don't close properly on the unused ports and you get no pressure in the arms.  I had to silicone glue the flappers closed on the ports I decided not to use.

I'd love to slap the itshay out of the people who drive the design of these appliances into the toilet.  The design and manufacturing of these units suck.  The make-it-cheaper-but-only-good-enough-to-get-past-the-warranty mentality has to stop.  I'll pay triple for a well-made machine that actually lasts for a couple of decades or more.  Are the butt-heads in the industry actually listening?

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Dishwasher design
OLD_CURMUDGEON   9/3/2013 8:39:40 AM
NO RATINGS
I know a few ex-patriated German engineers, fellows who've been in the U.S. for several decades, and independently they've confided in me that they think some of the German technology, whether automotive, or not, is too highly "engineered", based on theoretical principles, and NOT on real-world conditions.  So, it would seem that maybe this BOSCH dishwasher fits into that mold.  There are certainly many, many other examples of German-designed products which HAVE proven to be of exceptionally good design & build, so lumping them into one big "bucket" is NOT a very mature thing to do....

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Dishwasher Reliability
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   8/31/2013 11:26:51 AM
NO RATINGS
One very relevant, but relatively obscure secret in the Appliance industry is the widespread practice of co-branding.  Next time you ask a repairman, or better yet, directly review a BOM or Parts list, notice the exploded isometrics show the same P/N's  across multiple Brand Names.  I know that at least (3) major brand name labels are all placed on units designed entirely by one large ODM/OEM in Central Florida.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Style being the primary consideration.
Charles Murray   8/28/2013 4:14:36 PM
NO RATINGS
Spoken like a true engineer, William K. I don't think you'd ever get an argument on the style-vs-substance statement from our readership.

Reuven
User Rank
Bronze
Dishwasher design
Reuven   8/28/2013 12:26:10 AM
NO RATINGS
In 1985 we bought a Whirlpool Dishwasher.  It had a rotary control with electrical connection controlled by rotating cams.  The cams were made of a material that seemed to be nylon.  Over a period of a few years the cams wore enough so that the machine would not cycle properly.  Service calls helped a little, but eventualy Whrilpool agreed to replace the machine with a newer model.  I don't remember much of the replacement, but it too did not have a very long life.  Apparently, Whirlpool does not understand design and material selection.  We have had several Kenmore machines that have not lasted more than 6 or 7 years.  They too were probably made by Whirlpool.  My brother-in-law had a Bosch dishwasher that he said had one problem after another.  I doubt that any new machines are designed and made well.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Style being the primary consideration.
William K.   8/27/2013 8:19:17 PM
NO RATINGS
This discussion, and the remarks about the hidden controls being the current fad, all bring to mind one of the other signs that hung on the wall in my office: "When Style wins over Substance, WE ALL LOSE". It was not popular with the several vice-presidents, and it led to my never meeting with customers in my office, but most of the hourly staff thought it was "well spoken." I am not certain exactly what they meant by that, but I took it as an approval.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Failure Prone Electronics
Charles Murray   8/27/2013 6:08:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, racerjerry, planned obsolescence is still alive and well.

Page 1/3  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Made by Monkeys
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 18 - 22, Embedded Software Development With Python & the Raspberry Pi
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service