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Power Glitch Tunes Out TV

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Larry M
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Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/14/2013 4:24:47 PM
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My previous post, Rob, was meant to suggest that resistance to surges is IMPROVED, not compromised, because surges on both inputs are clamped to the SAME ground line, not different ones.

In what I believe is the most common case, the damage is caused because the "grounds" are transiently at different potentials from one another. Locating both lines (e.g., cable and power or antenna and power) in the same protector eliminates this possibility.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Failure Rates
Rob Spiegel   5/14/2013 4:07:57 PM
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Interesting, Larry. I didn't realize you could use the same surge protector for cable and electrical lines. Is anything compromised when the two are in the same unit?

Larry M
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Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/13/2013 3:56:02 PM
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Many surge protectors/outlet strips include "F" style connectors for antenna/cable protection and also RJ-11 connectors for modem/fax protection.

I have an intuitive feeling that running both signals through a common surge protector assembly like that may provide better protection from differential-mode surges--that is when the cable or phone line is at significantly different potential from the AC mains--since it would tend to clamp both signals to the same ground point.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Failure Rates
Rob Spiegel   5/13/2013 3:44:59 PM
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Good point, Larry. I hadn't really thought about protecting anything from its cable exposure. Sure enough, a quick search shows there are plenty of surge protectors for cable TVs. Their price range is roughly equivalent to wall-connection electrical surge protectors.

Larry M
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Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/13/2013 10:23:33 AM
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Indeed.  My TV/home theater is connected through a surge protector. The antenna cable also runs through a surge protector.

These things have become expensive as computers have become cheaper, and should be protected as well.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Failure Rates
Rob Spiegel   5/13/2013 10:08:02 AM
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That makes sense, Larry. My TV certainly is connected to a cable. Hadn't thought that was a vulnerability, but obviously it is. My computer is wireless, but it is connected to a wall socket -- with a surge protector between the computer and the wall. Sounds like my TV is more vulnerable than my computer.

William K.
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Re: TV simple mode
William K.   5/12/2013 3:33:47 PM
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Rdelaplaza, THANKS MANY TIMES OVER!!!

One of the service menue codes that you provided got me out of the self test mode. I still need to get through the setup menue, but at least now I am not trapped in that mode any more. 

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Failure Rates
William K.   5/9/2013 10:21:41 PM
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Larry M. you have made a very good point about wireless connections that I had not considered, and you are certainly correct. Fiber optics would also offer almost as good of protection, but it is more delicaate and probably more expensive currently.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: TV simple mode
William K.   5/9/2013 10:19:14 PM
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Rdelaplaza, thanks for the information. I asked their "service expert" if there was any method that did not need the remote and they could have given me this, but chose not to. I will certainly give it a try.

Thanks again, in advance.

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/9/2013 2:03:59 PM
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Rob, most of us DO use surge protectors on our expensive audio and video entertainment gear. What makes audio and networked computers a difficult problem is the dual connection to both power and either an outside antenna or a cable. Lightning enters one and exits the other, even if there's no power surge. The differential in voltage/ground levels between the two is what causes the damage.

We all have stories about this. Mine was a strike in late July, 2007 which involved both DSL and the power lines. It took out a DSL modem, e-port eithernet switch, The NICs in two computers (desktop, easy to swap out; laptop, had to switch to PCMCIA adapter), a really nice phone/answering machine, and a run of telephone quad cable.

The trend to wirelessly connected computers will actually reduce the frequency at which this type of damage occurs.

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