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Power Glitch Tunes Out TV

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AnandY
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Replacement not available
AnandY   5/6/2013 8:02:59 AM
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The representative said they don't sell a replacement remote for that model, since by now it is almost three years old, and also they changed the codes... or something.


In today's world, consumer electronics is rapidly developing. Every year, new product like TV, digital camers, camcorders, etc will be launced in market. The issue of replacemnt model not available is very common. After 2-3years of launch you will not get the replacemt products.

naperlou
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Re: Replacement not available
naperlou   5/6/2013 9:23:56 AM
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William, Anand is correct.  The thing is too old in terms of our modern consumer product cycle.  On the other hand, you might look at universal remotes that can mimic other brands.  We even had one from one manufacturer that was programmable, even though it came with a particular set.  There are also hobbist kits for microcontrollers that you might play with, if you are so inclined.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Replacement not available
Elizabeth M   5/7/2013 4:33:40 AM
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This is another example of the belief I have that current products (not just electronics, but many others) are not built to be repaired, but replaced and cycled out every couple of years. I think that's just the way things are these days with how rapidly innovation evolves. It's frustrating, but true.

William K.
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Re: Replacement not available
William K.   5/7/2013 8:52:43 PM
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Naperlou, I am aware that any consumer electronic thing over six months old is considered obsolete, but I really don't care what those people think! Just because it is that old, it is still a good resolution digital television with a very convenient built in DVD player, and it was by no means the cheapest one in the store. Your new car is obsolete a year after you buy it, but if you could not get repair parts for it you would certainly be "unhappy", I would think. 

As for the universal remotes, yes, I have a couple of them, and there are about 15 pages listing the potential codes that can be programmed, including about 25 listed for the Emerson/Funai brand. And none of them work. Of course, most of the codes usually don't work, is what I have observed. 

Other manufacturers tend to continue with the same remote codes a lot more, and usually can provide a replacement part. 

patb2009
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Re: Replacement not available
patb2009   5/6/2013 3:31:45 PM
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many laptops have an IR port, with clever code, you could easily push

codes in.

 

Also universal remote controls available from 3rd parties may work.

 

I'd suggest looking to see, if you can get the code patterns, or borrow a remote

from someone in your area.

 

 

tekochip
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Remotes Only
tekochip   5/6/2013 9:24:03 AM
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It's becoming quite common and irritating, too. Many consumer devices no longer have as much as a power button on the device itself because everything is now controlled from the remote. The manufacturers may say it's for a sleek, clean look, but it's really to make the unit cheaper.


Debera Harward
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Re: Remotes Only
Debera Harward   5/6/2013 5:53:10 PM
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I agree with tekochip, That now a days technology is changing so rapidly that if certain issue comes in any of your electronic gadget either it becomes useless or you have to spend same amount of money to get it repaired .However you should try some universal remote maybe it works with your model and  you be the lucky one  .

Ralphy Boy
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Re: Remotes Only
Ralphy Boy   5/8/2013 4:03:48 PM
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My last big screen rear projection TV was out of color alignment, and adjusting that required the remote... which had broken. I didn't look too hard for a replacement remote because I was getting close to replacing the TV.

And I recently found my DVD/surround sound system's remote after it was lost for a while. Aside from not having to get up to jump ahead or backwards in the DVD... It is nice to once again have the ability to actually control the sound field. Without the remote the only sound control I had was VOLUME...

And sleekness of design was not an issue on the DVD. Of the dozen buttons on the main unit half stick up an 1/8 of an inch.

There is just no allowance being made for the loss of the remote... and I've cussed about that a time or two.  

  

Dr Bob
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handset
Dr Bob   5/7/2013 9:15:10 AM
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I doubt that the problem is in the handset but in the tv itself.

To check point the handset at a video camera (webcam) and press any button.

 

If you see a flashing white light then the handset is OK and the tv has been fried!

Cosmictech
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Unsupported remote controls
Cosmictech   5/7/2013 9:23:56 AM
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Luckily for us there are companies quite happy to supply original remote controls.  I've found this one rather good (several purchases) and here is your remote:

http://www.newremotecontrol.com/emerson/catalog_item.php?catnum=NF607UD

 

Regards, Cosmictech

Larry M
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Re: Unsupported remote controls
Larry M   5/7/2013 10:02:58 AM
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Also try eBay and Craigslist for used remotes which are exact replacements. This has worked for me.

Enter "Search all craigs" into your favorite search engine and you will find several sites which spider-search all the local craigslists and aggregate the results for you.

 

William K.
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Re: Unsupported remote controls
William K.   5/7/2013 8:40:46 PM
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Cosmictech, I will investigate that website. Thanks. 

mtripoli3
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A couple of things...
mtripoli3   5/7/2013 9:46:57 AM
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Given the "age" of the TV, it is very doubtful that they used a proprietary code set. There are a couple of IC manufacturers that make the devices used in the remote controls; the days of "roll your own" are over. A "universal" remote will in all likelihood work. If not, a quick search on eBay produced a bunch of hits for remotes for this TV; it seemed most around $30. There seemed to be many remotes pictured so you'll have to dig around and match up the pictures.

As for the remote itself (and things made the same way, calculators, etc.) I've revived more of these than I care to think about. They are usually made as a single sided PCB on paper phenolic with some copper traces and conductive carbon ink over the top of the copper traces insulated with "paint". The first thing you want (besides the obvious mini set of screwdrivers) is a "Prismacolor Magic Rub Vinyl White Eraser" available at any office supply store for $1.00. This is indispensable for "fixing" just about any contact surface there is. I've "fixed" SIM cards, USB thumb drives, SD cards, etc. ad nauseum with this thing.

When you get the remote open, check around the battery contacts first for a broken PCB trace to the battery contacts. Careful soldering or conductive epoxy will fix this. Also check arond the LED for the same thing. Second, remove the conductive rubber pad and "erase" all the interdigitated fingers with the eraser. Over time the contacts will develop a thin film that prevents good conductivity. They may "look" clean but you will notice the difference immediately. Do the same with the small black pads inside each of the rubber "buttons". If it is one of the really cheap constructions there may be separate metal dome switch's held on with scotch tape. These can be lifted and the board cleaned as well. Tedious, but it can be done. 

I can't overstress the usefulness of this particular eraser. I've "saved" phones, cameras, "dead" memory cards simply by "erasing" the contacts. I have a bunch of these on my bench, desk, kitchen drawers...

 

Larry M
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Re: A couple of things...
Larry M   5/7/2013 10:23:02 AM
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Great tips--same as I would have offered. Here's one more.

Take a brush with fine brass bristles and brush the pins of any surface-mount IC that has fine-pitch leads to remove any tin-whisker shorts that may have developed. Use a brass brush, not a toothbrush or other polymer to avoid static discharge. Blow the board clean orally or with compressed air to remove conductive fragments.

When this fixes the problem, have a drink and blame the silly Europeans and their worse-than-useless RoHS act.

Do you think that lead-free solder can actually propagate across the distance between two IC leads and short them?  Yes, it actually can span great distances. Search the internet for scary pictures.

mtripoli3
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Gold
Re: A couple of things...
mtripoli3   5/7/2013 10:36:42 AM
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Good thought as well, though I do it a little differently. I use a toothbrush and (drum roll) liquid hand soap running under hot water. I've found that the liquid hand soap that "foams" when pumped out of the bottle works amazingly well (I haven't researched what the "foaming" agent is; some kind of surfactant). I do this on SMT boards examined under a microscope - as good or better than the fancy system we had for cleaning semiconductors in a clean room. On FR-4 boards (epoxy resin/fiberglass) you can get away with drying them with compressed air (from a grounded system). On phenolic where the board wil absorb some moisture put them in the over at 100 degrees F for half an hour. Cleaning any board can be done this way, as well as drying out any electronics subjected to water (phones dropped in a toilet can be fixed readily if the battery can be taken out fast enough - so much for the convenience of having a built in battery, huh?). 

Larry M
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Re: A couple of things...
Larry M   5/7/2013 11:09:51 AM
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It should work. The water should eliminate static dangers from the plastic brush bristles.

mtripoli3
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Gold
Re: A couple of things...
mtripoli3   5/7/2013 11:26:48 AM
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Precisely...

D. Sherman
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Silver
Probably not the remote
D. Sherman   5/7/2013 9:56:59 AM
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It may be small consolation, but I suspect that it's the TV, rather than the remote, that is bad. The problems started with the storm. Very likely there were power spikes as well as drop-outs. The TV, being connected to the power line, is much more likely to have been damaged by this than the battery-powered remote.

If it were mine, and I cared enough to try to get it working, I would look for a hard reset pin, jumper, or button hidden somewhere on the PCB. Or if there was an identifiable commercial CPU on the board, I'd look up its data sheet and find out which pin was its reset pin. But failing that, there's no telling how the engineers designed it, and so there's not much chance of reverse-engineering it with any reasonable amount of time and effort. Of course if you're like the guy who took apart an LED light bulb and figured out now to get into the microcontroller's serial port and reprogram it, you may have a different definition of "reasonable" than I would. Still, I think the problem is in the TV, not the remote.

muddy56
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Re: Probably not the remote
muddy56   5/7/2013 11:33:25 AM
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One thing you could try just to make sure it is your remote.   Point the remote at a video or still camera.  Look through the view finder when you press the buttons on the remote.  We can not see infared light but through the view finder of a camera it shows up. 

William K.
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Re: Probably not the remote
William K.   5/7/2013 8:38:20 PM
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D. Sherman, I did search the circuit boards for a reset line, and I found one. Using my DVM I found it at about 5 volts, so I pulled it low to reset. And it does reset-to the power off/standby state, and pressing the on button gets me exactly where I was.

As for "caring enough to protect the set, it was off and I was sleeping when the storm blew through, about 3AM to 5 AM, which is when I do some of my best sleeping. And as most folks leave their appliances plugged in most of the time, it seems to me that there should be a mechanical switch to turn off the power supply, except that would not help, since the same remote control processor handles all of the other functions as well as power on-off. And I have downloaded a circuit diagram and the service manual and they don't mention any other way to exit that mode except for using the remote. Which I don't have. For most electronics the remote is the first thing to fail, and oftn the most likely to be damaged either mechanically or through leaking batteries.

D. Sherman
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Re: Probably not the remote
D. Sherman   5/7/2013 9:48:04 PM
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It sounds like you've investigated it more thoroughly than I probably would have. I suppose it's saving its current state in NVRAM so that when it powers back up it reverts to what it was doing when it powered down. That's a "feature" of many modern electronic devices that turns it a real bugger of a bug when the software gets deranged.

I suspect there is still a hardware serial port hidden somewhere inside it that can be used to control and program the controller in the absence of a remote. I would be surprised if they relied on an IR port for factory test. It might even run linux and support telnet. An amazing number of devices these days do. But good luck finding it.

Have you considered just trying to troubleshoot the IR link, in case something in it got fried? Can you trace through from the photodiode through some waveshaper circuit to a pin on the CPU and see if something resembling a binary waveform appears when you push the buttons on the remote? If not, you could try any other IR remote just to see if the receiver circuitry is okay. The protocol might not be recognized, but you should see a reasonable waveform.

I totally agree with you about the need for a real power switch. A power switch should mechanically cut the circuit to protect against all powerline problems short of a nearby lightning strike, and should also provide a way force a cold reboot of the CPU. One has to wonder if the engineers who design these things are ignorant of good common-sense design practice, or they are overrideen by the marketeers and bean-counters.

William K.
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Re: Probably not the remote
William K.   5/8/2013 9:36:28 AM
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D. Sherman, actually an infrared connectionnfor initial setup would be very handy since it would be the most tolerant connection to a set. And acording to the service manual it is able to do almost all of the required adjustments.

If I had the remote I would not have a problem, but I don't have it. Probably I could test that part of the circuit with any remote, though. 

The circuit board with the remote decoding also has most of the other logic functions on a board about 3 by 4 inches, containing a whole lot of logic stuck onto both sides. I will need to examine the drawings very closely again, but part of my problem is a poor grasp of reading Chinese text. 

D. Sherman
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Re: Probably not the remote
D. Sherman   5/8/2013 9:51:58 AM
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The main reason I suspect the failure is in the set rather than in the remote is that the failure began after a period of power instability. If it weren't for that fact, either part of the system would be equally suspect.

j-allen
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Power glitch tunes out TV
j-allen   5/7/2013 10:27:38 AM
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I thank the originator for including the brand--Emerson--in his post.  I will conscientiously avoid them in any future purchases.  Abandoning a major piece of electronis after just 3 years is unpardonable.  I have gotten help from legitimate companies on equipment more than 40 years old. 

mtripoli3
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Re: Power glitch tunes out TV
mtripoli3   5/7/2013 10:51:16 AM
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Yeah, except. He said FUNAI as well. Funai is the actual manufacturer for many, many companies. No different than LG or just about every OEM there is. How are you going to avoid buying from a particular OEM?

I have a "Polaroid" large screen TV in my living room. It was in the lobby at my wife's work and had "stopped playing sound" and had a loud buzzing sound. They were going to put it in the trash. My wife instead asked if she could have it. Long story  short, one of the switching power supplies in the thing (it has three) had electrolytic caps go bad. As soon as I heard what was wrong I knew what the problem was. I replaced the caps and the thing has been working going on 4 years.

I have many (6) Viewsonic monitors of a particular model. After 5 years they start "blinking on and off". As it turns out, this is a common problem with these monitors. Same deal; bad caps. So a couple of dollars for new caps and a bit of bench time and they're still going. I could say "I won't buy Viewsonic monitors" but I can't; for the money they are a great deal.

The true root of this problem lies with the consumer. The manufacturers give us what we want; the instant gratification of being able to walk in the big box store and leaving with what "should be" a big ticket item, within a budget most can afford. So they had to skimp on "good caps". They used plastic clips and snap the thing together instead of using more screws. So what, you got what you wanted. Try telling someone that product "X" will last twice as long but will cost 1/4 more and see what the reaction is. If this wasn't the problem Walmart wouldn't be selling big screen TV's.

RICKZ28
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Failure Rates
RICKZ28   5/7/2013 11:38:45 AM
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For myself, due to the high number of failures and poor performance, I read many "user" reviews before purchasing a consumer electronics product, especially a TV.  For the most part, the more expensive name brands have a much better track record.  The less well know and off brands are usually have many bad reviews from those who owned.  Another good source is Consumer Reports.  I have not been disappointed by my three Sony LCD TVs.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Failure Rates
Rob Spiegel   5/7/2013 5:26:44 PM
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That's a good practice, RickZ28. That didn't use to be necessary. Another thing I've learned over time is that the remote is everything. With many products now, if you lose the remote, you may as well throw away the product.

RICKZ28
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Re: Failure Rates
RICKZ28   5/7/2013 5:59:24 PM
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1 saves
Rob, I know what you're saying about not losing the remote control for electronic equipment, as most have minimal controls on the unit itself.  The controls on current LCD and LED TVs can be difficult to find and use, especially when the TV is mounted on a wall.  Fortunately for my LCD TVs, the TV remote controls are not used since the TVs are operated by the DirecTv remote for all the basic functions (turn on/off, volume and input source).  I keep the TV remote controls in a more secure location for when more TV functions are needed.

It can be a regular chore finding the remote control after somebody else uses the TV...typically stuffed between sofa cushions or underneath furniture somewhere.  I wish there was a location button on the electronics unit to sound an alarm on the lost remote...sort of like how we find misplaced phones around the house (call the phone).

As for the original story about a power problem during a storm, the owner's manual for most consumer electronics warns against using during power problems and lightning storms.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Failure Rates
Rob Spiegel   5/8/2013 1:23:53 PM
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Yes, RickZ28, power storms can be rough on electrical devices even if they're not on. I couple weeks ago, by brother in Chicago experienced a power storm. He thinks his house may have been hit by lightning. None of his devices were on at the time, but they were plugged in. His computers and printer all had to be rebooted. It took some time to get everything back to normal. The one fatality was one of his garage doors. It quit and couldn't be resuscitated.

Larry M
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Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/8/2013 3:25:51 PM
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Well, that's the problem: Electronic appliances are never "off" any more. I've fixed a bunch of TVs for myself and my sons. But the last two were unrepairable. They were off when the power surge occurred and took out the "always on" circuitry that receives the IR commands. This small corner of the main circuit board contained a few discretes and a proprietary SMT IC. Cheaper to get a new TV than to get a new board.  Sigh.

William K.
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Re: Failure Rates
William K.   5/8/2013 3:58:15 PM
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Larry, OK, you know exactly what my situation is, then. Except that I don't have that special remote control any more. Next time I will certainly check for reviews on a product before I get it. Too late I found out that Funai is not a good company to deal with.

And I hope this discussion saves others from the aggravation of this sort of problem.

Larry M
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Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/8/2013 4:12:20 PM
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William, the problems are not quite the same.  My kids' TVs suffered catastrophic failure. Yours has apparently suffered only corruption of the data stored in NVRAM resulting in enabling only a Test Mode. You need to be able to execute a "Reset to Factory Defaults" which can only be done with the remote.

Furthermore, as some of the other responders have overlooked, it may have to be the exact remote; generic remotes can send general codes like Volume Up/Down and Channel Up/Down but may not send codes generated by pressing obscure key combinations or sequences. Or maybe you need to send a sequence of standard codes which couldn't be sent with a generic remote.  You haven't stated which is the case.

Used remotes are readily and inexpensively available on the internet. I've gotten some for satellite boxes for $7-8. I'm still not sure why you haven't ordered one. Is it that you discarded the old remote and don't have the part number? Have you tried just searching for the part number of the TV set or main board, to see what that gets you?

 

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Failure Rates
Rob Spiegel   5/9/2013 1:43:54 PM
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Wow, Larry, just a few small components and an expensive TV becomes junk. Would a surge protector have prevented this. We're accustomed to using surge protectors with computers. How about consumer electronics?

Larry M
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Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/9/2013 2:03:59 PM
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Rob, most of us DO use surge protectors on our expensive audio and video entertainment gear. What makes audio and networked computers a difficult problem is the dual connection to both power and either an outside antenna or a cable. Lightning enters one and exits the other, even if there's no power surge. The differential in voltage/ground levels between the two is what causes the damage.

We all have stories about this. Mine was a strike in late July, 2007 which involved both DSL and the power lines. It took out a DSL modem, e-port eithernet switch, The NICs in two computers (desktop, easy to swap out; laptop, had to switch to PCMCIA adapter), a really nice phone/answering machine, and a run of telephone quad cable.

The trend to wirelessly connected computers will actually reduce the frequency at which this type of damage occurs.

William K.
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Re: Failure Rates
William K.   5/9/2013 10:21:41 PM
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Larry M. you have made a very good point about wireless connections that I had not considered, and you are certainly correct. Fiber optics would also offer almost as good of protection, but it is more delicaate and probably more expensive currently.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Failure Rates
Rob Spiegel   5/13/2013 10:08:02 AM
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That makes sense, Larry. My TV certainly is connected to a cable. Hadn't thought that was a vulnerability, but obviously it is. My computer is wireless, but it is connected to a wall socket -- with a surge protector between the computer and the wall. Sounds like my TV is more vulnerable than my computer.

Larry M
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Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/13/2013 10:23:33 AM
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Indeed.  My TV/home theater is connected through a surge protector. The antenna cable also runs through a surge protector.

These things have become expensive as computers have become cheaper, and should be protected as well.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Failure Rates
Rob Spiegel   5/13/2013 3:44:59 PM
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Good point, Larry. I hadn't really thought about protecting anything from its cable exposure. Sure enough, a quick search shows there are plenty of surge protectors for cable TVs. Their price range is roughly equivalent to wall-connection electrical surge protectors.

Larry M
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Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/13/2013 3:56:02 PM
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Many surge protectors/outlet strips include "F" style connectors for antenna/cable protection and also RJ-11 connectors for modem/fax protection.

I have an intuitive feeling that running both signals through a common surge protector assembly like that may provide better protection from differential-mode surges--that is when the cable or phone line is at significantly different potential from the AC mains--since it would tend to clamp both signals to the same ground point.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Failure Rates
Rob Spiegel   5/14/2013 4:07:57 PM
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Interesting, Larry. I didn't realize you could use the same surge protector for cable and electrical lines. Is anything compromised when the two are in the same unit?

Larry M
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Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/14/2013 4:24:47 PM
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My previous post, Rob, was meant to suggest that resistance to surges is IMPROVED, not compromised, because surges on both inputs are clamped to the SAME ground line, not different ones.

In what I believe is the most common case, the damage is caused because the "grounds" are transiently at different potentials from one another. Locating both lines (e.g., cable and power or antenna and power) in the same protector eliminates this possibility.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Failure Rates
Rob Spiegel   5/14/2013 9:16:29 PM
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Thanks pretty interesting, Larry. And it makes sense. Thanks for the education.

Larry M
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Re: Failure Rates
Larry M   5/15/2013 9:04:52 AM
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How

about

yr

pgmrs

fix

this

prblm

of

narrow

thrds

?

Larry

Ed Fuller
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Iron
Sources of old electronic devices
Ed Fuller   5/8/2013 11:33:28 AM
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When looking for old devices and repair parts, give your local thrift shops a look.  As long as it's not a "hole-in-the-wall" many of them have a plethora of various controllers, printers, scanners, etc. that can be used or parted-out for your projects.  Plus, the money usually goes to a good cause.

William K.
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Re: Sources of old electronic devices
William K.   5/8/2013 3:54:33 PM
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Ed F. Thanks for the tip, I had not considered that option.

bobjengr
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Re: Sources of old electronic devices
bobjengr   5/8/2013 4:59:02 PM
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  Great idea Ed, I had not thought of thrift shops.  This would probably be much more preferable than flea markets.   Let me ask a question, I know major "appliances" carry a warranty but what would be one for the Emerson TV mentioned in the post?  Surely a year. 

theswami
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Iron
replacement remote
theswami   5/8/2013 4:16:07 PM
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Hi there

I've bought remotes for my Funai kitchen tv/vcr from this place.

http://remotes.com/store/emerson/ld195emx.html


give them a try.

Ron

ragtoplvr
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Gold
TV simple mode
ragtoplvr   5/8/2013 5:08:19 PM
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I have not read comments so if someone else discusses this, good for them.

All TV remotes need a nursing home mode.  In this mode only on off, channel up/down and volume up down work.  Not even mute.  And make those buttons BIG

My mom is in the nursing home.  Every week at least 1 resident asks me to help her with her remote, she has pressed some button and now the TV will not work.  It has been as simple as sound muted (not all tv's will volume up cancel mute), or all the settings screwed up wrong input etc.

Nursing home mode!  NOW

rdelaplaza
User Rank
Silver
Re: TV simple mode
rdelaplaza   5/8/2013 8:21:04 PM
I know that almost always engineers and geeks build a hidden backdoor to many of their creations, like the old trick to return the ROM BIOS on old PCs back to the factory defaults was to turn on the PC while holding a combination of keys, usually the INS key or the INS and the DEL keys

It seem like It's true again with this Funai / Emerson Receivers and almost every other brand that I know, just turn on the unit while holdin a key or combination of keys will take you to the menu, then using th VOL UP, VOL DWN or other keys you can navigate through the menus.

Try this ones, who knows it may work, no money invested so far to try it.

Funai Service Menu

Funai LCD Service Menu Access Code Method 1

  1. Turn the power on using the {POWER} button on the TV.
  2. Press the {STANDBY-ON}, {2}, {7}, {1} & {MUTE} buttons on the remote control.
  3. The Service Menu will be displayed.
  4. To exit, press the {STANDBY-ON} button on the remote.

Funai LCD Service Menu Access Code Method 2

  1. Turn the power off.
  2. Press and hold {MENU} button on the TV.
  3. Then press the {STANDBY-ON} button on the TV.
  4. The TV will turn on with the Service Menu displayed.
  5. To exit, press the {STANDBY-ON} button on the TV.

Funai LCD Service Menu Access Code Method 3

  1. Turn the power off.
  2. Press and hold {SETUP} button on the TV.
  3. Then press the {STANDBY-ON} button on the TV.
  4. The TV will turn on with the Service Menu displayed.
  5. To exit, press the {STANDBY-ON} button on the TV.

Funai LCD Service Menu Access Code Method 4

  1. Press the {CH -} & {VOL -} buttons at same time.
  2. Then press the {MENU} button.
  3. The Service Menu displayed.
  4. To exit, turn the power off.

Funai LCD Service Menu Access Code Method 5

  1. Press the {CH+}, {CH -} & {VOL +} buttons at same time.
  2. Then press the {MENU} button.
  3. The Service Menu displayed.
  4. To exit, turn the power off.

Hey good luck and have fun.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: TV simple mode
William K.   5/9/2013 10:19:14 PM
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Rdelaplaza, thanks for the information. I asked their "service expert" if there was any method that did not need the remote and they could have given me this, but chose not to. I will certainly give it a try.

Thanks again, in advance.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: TV simple mode
William K.   5/12/2013 3:33:47 PM
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Rdelaplaza, THANKS MANY TIMES OVER!!!

One of the service menue codes that you provided got me out of the self test mode. I still need to get through the setup menue, but at least now I am not trapped in that mode any more. 

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: TV simple mode
Larry M   5/15/2013 2:57:05 PM
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Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: TV simple mode
Rob Spiegel   5/16/2013 11:53:28 AM
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That's pretty good, Larry. Does it really take care of all devices?

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: TV simple mode
Larry M   5/16/2013 4:18:10 PM
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"All" is a large and potentially infinite number. It's worked on everything we've tried so far. These remotes have been around for a while and there are probably new devices around which aren't covered.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: TV simple mode
Rob Spiegel   6/4/2013 2:42:19 PM
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This device could come in handy for those who lose their remote or for those whose remote breaks, leaving them with no ability to control their products.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: TV simple mode
William K.   5/26/2013 4:24:10 PM
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Larry M, thanks for the link pointer. But my question is how does one program the device, and does it actually come with a book that lists the code to enter for all of those different sets? I own a device that reads the code transmitted by a remote and uses that to figure which code listing to use, but if I had the original remote I would not have the problem. Our other "universl" remote should be marked "fairly universal", since it does not include a number of types, and the listing for mine does not work. That is the other problem with universal remotes is that not everything in the book works.

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Similar problem
Cadman-LT   5/17/2013 10:33:52 PM
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I had a somewhat similar problem with a hi-8 player years back. I bought the unit used and it came with no remote. I wasn't too concerned about that. It wasn't until later that I discovered that there were certain operations that only the remote would do. This particular remote cost more than I spent on the player itself. I wish they wouldn't do things like that...lol

Critic
User Rank
Platinum
Cheapness.
Critic   5/23/2013 3:56:19 PM
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Most consumers want TVs to be CHEAP.  That's why they don't have control panels.  Plan on buying a new TV every few years, and you won't be disappointed.


Remotes for older TVs are available.  In fact, there are online sellers who specialize in selling them.  They are not inexpensive, but they are CHEAP.

Critic
User Rank
Platinum
Remote
Critic   5/23/2013 4:02:21 PM
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http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-EMERSON-FUNAI-REMOTE-CONTROL-NF607UD-LD195EMX-/310264202241#vi-content

$99.00.  10 available, how many would you like?

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