HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Made by Monkeys

We Just Can't Get a Handle on This Pan

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/5  >  >>
William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re:Ceramic non-stick? I think that we are off-topic a bit
William K.   5/17/2013 10:20:22 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, it is certainly true that insight is a far better way to stay safe than simply memorizing some safety "script" that claims to always keep one safe, although it does not touch most exceptions. Itappears to me that those scripts are all written by lawyers intent on assuring that no instruction could be to do anything that if done  incorrectly could cause a problem.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
Ann R. Thryft   5/17/2013 12:39:24 PM
NO RATINGS
William, thanks for the clarification (although I still think your previous comment was funny). I heartily agree that more basic skills, survival tools and basic understanding about how the physical world works are sometimes missing and, if more common, would help avoid a lot of accidents.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
William K.   5/16/2013 7:56:04 AM
NO RATINGS
Ann, the fundamentals of such things as inertia, leverage, weight, and stiffness of materials should be well within the grasp of a third grader. While the math associated with inertia and stored energy is sort of complex, the concept that something heavy moving will take some larger effort to halt is not that hard. Likewise the relationship between weight and the effort needed to lift it. These are the very basic concepts, which in the past year I have met adults who did not even grasp them. 

I am not talking about making engineers out of third graders, just giving them a few more survival tools, that I see missing from quite a few people.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
Ann R. Thryft   5/15/2013 12:41:58 PM
NO RATINGS
William, I do appreciate your sense of humor. I don't think third-graders need to be taught physics so much as I think that they should be taught how to a) cook real food and b) use cookware. I was, back in the ancient days, when it was called Home Economics. There were lots of reasons why girls learning cooking and sewing and boys learning shop was a bad idea--but instead of opening both up to both, they took it all away.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
William K.   5/11/2013 2:24:41 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, I understand about that, and it just seems amazing that so many such continue to live to get older, but never any smarter. Perhaps it would benefit all of society if there was some instruction about the fundamental concepts of kinematics and thermal transfers provided to kids in the third grade. They would not need to learn the math, but just understand the relationships. Of course I realize that goes completely against the concept of dumbing down that is currently so prevalent just about everywhere. I don't think that I have the answer for that, I am not even sure that there exists an answer. ( wow, that sounds really gloomy, doesn't it?)

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
Ann R. Thryft   5/10/2013 2:16:40 PM
NO RATINGS
William, I've known several people who apparently didn't understand how to use different types of cookware without burning the food or poisoning themselves. I don't understand what the problem is, but I did have to teach my nephew not to start cooking with the heat on high, while he was staying with us. I simply told him my pans cost a few hundred $$ each and it would be on him to replace them if he damaged them. That, plus a basic 101 lesson in cookware use, seemed to do the job.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
Ann R. Thryft   5/9/2013 6:25:51 PM
NO RATINGS
thrashercharged, thanks for that info. The pans are very smooth and pretty darn heavy. And yes, I got them in a hardware store. Ah, those were the days! When you could actually get good cookware and housewares at hardware stores. In the rural area where I live, this is still possible sometimes. Thanks also for the warning about the surface on the newer Lodge pans, and the plus vote on the Japanese stuff--I'm thinking about trying out one or two of those. The ones at the link I gave are not hundreds of dollars, and Williams-Sonoma has already vetted them for me, so I've got high hopes.

RMenon
User Rank
Iron
Counterweight
RMenon   5/3/2013 5:31:46 PM
NO RATINGS
Just saw this blog, and couldn't help posting this comment.  Aside for retiring the offending designer pan to security detail (read - using it as a self-defence device against intruding burglars), attaching a simple counterweight should solve the issue with the pan tipping over when filled below capacity.  Remember the slotted bronze weights used in merchandise weigh-platforms?  Just slide one of the appropriate weight on the lip of the pan diametrically opposite the handle.  No drilling, no welding, no new purchases.  Problem solved. 

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
William K.   4/25/2013 5:06:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the advice on the "stop" holes, I had not considered that. My other problem is that I only own gas welding equipment, so any patching that I did would probably be a braze metal patch. The bad part would be getting it smooth after the patch was in place. At that point the work involved does point a bit more toward a new pan. OR I can keep using this one until it either leaks or falls apart.

About drilling bakelite, the process is much different from drilling steel. First the work must be clamped so that it can't climb the drill, then you use a drill press with low speed, a sharp drill bit, and very gentle feed pressure. Forcing the drill in hard will indeed cause massive breaking. The drilling must be done gently. It is not as bad as drilling glass or ceramics, but it does take a gentle touch. I know that many folks ram the drill through everything, but that is just not how to do it with bakelite.

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
OLD_CURMUDGEON   4/25/2013 9:18:10 AM
NO RATINGS
Having grown up in the "country", all my family (aunts, cousins, etc.) used nothing but cast iron fry pans, from the 6" size to the 16" size.  And, they all cooked on gas stoves, open fires, etc.  And, one thing I can tell you is that these pans were NEVER washed in soap & water w/ the other cookware.  All the women would do is to drain the remains out... usually went into the dogs' dishes, and then wipe them clean with a clean rag, and hang them on the hooks over the stoves.  We still have my grandmother's cast iron fry pans, and since she was married in 1904, that makes them over 100 years old!  Not a crack to be found anywhere.  And, they'rejust as "non-stick" as the best teflon/aluminum pan to be bought today.  There's nothing better tasting that bacon & eggs in a cast iron pan, or home fries potatoes.  Can't wait until Sunday morning... my mouth is watering just thinkin' 'bout it..........

Page 1/5  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Made by Monkeys
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Jul 21 - 25, Design Products With Bluetooth Low Energy
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service