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Made by Monkeys

Snafus With the Speakers

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notarboca
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Gold
Re: Making it work
notarboca   10/31/2012 11:52:42 PM
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Even with a good statement of work, I asked the manufacturing staff for "as built" drawings to try to catch things like this.  Wouldn't have had an effect on the magnet glue problem, though.

jmiller
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Platinum
Re: Making it work
jmiller   10/31/2012 10:23:06 PM
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I agree with the use of good instructions or standard operating procedures.  However, I don't like the idea of standard operating procedures being, "bring it to me and I'll fix it with some baling wire and twine."

jmiller
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Re: Making it work
jmiller   10/31/2012 10:21:22 PM
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I liked the article as well.  Kind of makes one wonder if the tolerance stack was done to understand if the process was capable of producing repeatable parts with the process being used.

jmiller
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Platinum
Re: Making it work
jmiller   10/31/2012 10:16:29 PM
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And in this case it sounds like someone forgot to check and see if the glue would give the product the life it needed.  Could have been one of those cost out ideas.  Or more than likely, someone just thought it would work as good as the other stuff.

Tim
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Platinum
Re: Making it work
Tim   10/31/2012 8:06:38 PM
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This story exemplifies the importance of good work instructions. A good system will account for a new employee and still make quality product. Documentation of task steps and quality risks on each step is important.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Making it work
naperlou   10/31/2012 11:01:46 AM
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Scott, that is a good point.  This reminds me of a number of situations I have seen with small manufacturers over the past few years.  The problem was parts testing over time (life testing).  You really need to trust your supplier or have a good warranty program.  On the other hand, even with a good warranty the failure often leaves a bad taste with the consumer. 

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Odd Failure
tekochip   10/31/2012 10:55:34 AM
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I spent a lot of years as a club musician and speakers were tossed around quite a bit, not like Pete Townsend, but things get dropped, bounced around on the stage, and in vans.  I've heard voice coils rub, seen them melt, and shatter (titanium horns).  I've seen surround dry rot and fatigue, but I've never seen a magnet fall off, not even on the big 20lb magnet JBLs.  This sounds like a pretty low quality vendor.


Scott Orlosky
User Rank
Platinum
Making it work
Scott Orlosky   10/31/2012 10:09:26 AM
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I really enjoyed this story since it addresses the real world issues of manufacturing.  It's fine to design something on a CAD program, but somewhere along the line, the actual parts have to be assembled and that, it turns out, is every bit as important and the design itself.  Attention to detail, proper assembly techniques, training and clear work instructions all matter.  Thanks.

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