HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
Blogs
Made by Monkeys

Oven Door Is Not Child-Proof

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/4  >  >>
David12345
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Oven door is not conveniently lockable
David12345   1/17/2012 11:59:35 AM
NO RATINGS
William K.,

I apologize . . . it was Tom W. that talked about a child possibly playing in the oven and getting hurt as with a refrigerator.  I agree that even a small child would likely need to have the racks removed or at the lowest position to even have a chance of getting all the way in.

In regards to tipping: If a child were trying to climb in, they could tip the oven it over on themselves while on the door.  I also have seen tipping as an issue when a large turkey in the broiler pan was rested on the door of a lighter single range/oven.  I do agree that a bracket could be fabricated and installed fairly readily to any oven; even if, it did not come with that anti-tipping feature from the factory (Heck install some interlocking channel irons, or some styles of drawer slides).

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Oven door is not conveniently lockable
William K.   1/17/2012 11:24:53 AM
NO RATINGS
I never mentioned the hazard of a child entering an oven, I was addressing some comment about a kid on top of the stove. The racks in most ovens would make entry difficult, while still possible.

At least some of the self cleaning ovens had a feature that kept the door locked when the cycle was initiated, and did not provide a means to cancel the self cleaning cycle. OUr family's choice has been to avoid purchasing this feature. 

I have had a stove with the oven control front and center where it might be possible to accidently turn the oven on, but the ovens beginning to heat would certainly let anyone cleaning the inside become aware that something was amiss.

I will have to check the glass to see how hot it gets, but I can't imagine touching hot glass long enough to sustain a burn. Perhaps that reflex has not developed in some individuals.

David12345
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Oven door is not conveniently lockable
David12345   1/17/2012 11:14:04 AM
NO RATINGS
William K.,

The oven door and sides do not get hot enough to burn you normally, except in pryotechnic oven cleaning mode.  The glass however can get very hot (>120 degrees F.) particularly with the oven closed and set for baking at 425 to 450 degrees F..

The oven door latches that I have seen are not automatic, but manually pulled across; however, they automatically lock above a set temperature of roughly 600 degrees and above.

I don't see that a child would trap themselves into an oven; unless, a second child manually latches them in there after they climb in, or the oven falls on its face.  Most ovens have some venting, and seals that are not as airtight as on a refrigerator as well (not that I recommend climbing into an oven, even if it is off, but I believe it is less of an asphixiation hazard than an empty refrigerator).

ScottM
User Rank
Iron
Console Lock
ScottM   1/17/2012 10:48:56 AM
NO RATINGS
The console lock is most likely for cleaning.  So you don't accidently turn things on when you are scrubbing the spaghetti sauce off the console.  My HVAC controller has a similar feature.

jh
User Rank
Silver
It probably would add cost...
jh   1/17/2012 10:42:14 AM
NO RATINGS
I would suspect this feature would add cost to the oven because the present door lock is probably only designed for a low number of lock/unlock operations for cleaning and to make it used for every time you want to open the door to check if the food is done, to put food in and take it out...  would add thousands of lock/unlock cycles over the life of the oven so the locking mechanism would have to be engineered for the added usage.

It would also be nice to disable the "child proof " lock function so when the kiddos grow up and it is not needed.

In addition, this feature could also affect the long term reliability of the oven as well because if the lock fails to lock, the oven would lock you out from baking anything until it is repaired or it could lock your food into the oven which will probably exceed Betty Crocker's recommended baking time. 

Remember the Maytag Neptune front load washer door locking debacle? That reminds me...  If you have a Neptune front load with a timer knob you need to replace your wax motor if it is the original one before it damages your Q6 triac and R11 resistor on the control board.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Oven door is not conveniently lockable
William K.   1/17/2012 10:37:23 AM
NO RATINGS
This is amazing, coming from an engineer. If there really is some need to provide an anti-tip feature on a stove, two angle brackets, available from a large number of stores, both hardware and home improvement, can provide a far better anti-tip function than that bracket intended to grab a rear foot of the stove. Really, it is very simple: one bracket screws to the back of the stove about an inch below the top edge, then the second bracket is positioned above it and the mounting location marked on the wall. Pull the stove out and mount the second bracket on the wall, push the stove back into place and bolt the two togather, and the stove is tip proof. Of course, I have never heard of a stove tipping unless a really stupid person stood on the door, or there was an earthquake. At some point an individual should choose to be responsible for the results of their actions.

As for burning ones hand on an oven door, do they really get that hot? I agree that they get quite warm, even hot to the touch, but not hot enough to cause a burn quickly. More importantly, a door lock would not protect against touching the hot outside. Of course the inside will indeed be hot, that is how they work. A manually operated oven door lock may be a worthwhile accessory, but an automatic oven door lock would make sure that in the event of a fire in the oven there was no way to put it out. The one time I had one I quickly opened the door a bit and threw in a cup of water, and immediately closed the door. The steam that formed smothered the fire quite well. 

As for the dangers available to a child on top of the stove, if the parents are that lax in training and supervision they should probably not have a stove in the residence at all. I have never heard of a kid on the stove getting burned. BUt if it did happen, I would expect it to happen in California.

 

tomw
User Rank
Iron
Re: Oven Door Lock Mystery
tomw   1/17/2012 10:34:40 AM
NO RATINGS
I think that only allowing the lock to function during self cleaning is probably intentional to prevent a suffocation hazard for children playing with the oven.  You can't dispose of a refrigerator without removing the door or blocking it open for the same reason. 

Be careful for unintended consequences.

 

David12345
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Oven Door Lock Mystery
David12345   1/17/2012 10:01:23 AM
NO RATINGS
I see that having that additional feature programmed into the existing door lock at virtually no cost as a desireable option.  I don't want to see a government regulation requiring you buy the oven with that lock feature.

The only negative I see is that it may provide a false sence of security to parents.  From Big Al's blog, his son was seriously burned by catching himself with a hand against the hot glass on the oven door.  Even with a door lock, the hot glass will still be exposed.  Parent's must realize that, even with the lock, the burn risk is still high; unless, they also choose an oven without a glass window.

3drob
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Oven Door Lock Mystery
3drob   1/17/2012 9:45:21 AM
NO RATINGS
So, jmillion, you're suggesting that children should be allowed to be horribly burned or injured for no other reason than to learn a good lesson?  What doesn't kill you ... Or perhaps that should be their fate if their parents (or grandparents) aren't clued in to the dangers around the home?  We evolved in a different pool of dangers than now exist so our natural instincts are not always sufficient, and providing children a safe environment to learn is our responsibility as guardians.

But, the point of the post wasn't that the cost of the oven would go up to add a safety feature; it wouldn't.  Everything existed to provide the safety feature without any additional cost.  The manufacturer just didn't bother to connect the dots.

Providing parents with common sense tools to protect their children in that phase between being able to do things and knowing not to do them does NOT a nanny state make.

Big Al
User Rank
Iron
Re: Oven Door Lock Mystery
Big Al   1/17/2012 9:42:39 AM
NO RATINGS
Unbelievable.  The opportunity exists to make a common kitchen appliance safer for young children at no cost other than reprogramming the microprocessor and yet someone regards doing so as symptomatic of the "nanny state."

One of my sons was seriously burned on the palm of his hand when he was a toddler.  We had food baking in the oven and I was washing dishes at the adjacent sink when he came over to see what was happening.  i saw him trip and extend his hand to catch his fall, placing it flat on the glass of the hot oven.  I immediately realized he was being burned and picked him up, turning the sink faucet to cold, and running his hand beneath the water.  However, the momentary contact with the hot glass raised a blister over his entire palm.

We spent the next several hours at the hospital emergency room waiting to be seen while he cried in pain.  If I could have avoided the entire accident at little cost, I would have thought that money very well spent.

<<  <  Page 3/4  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Made by Monkeys
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service