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Made by Monkeys

Wiring Causes Constant Problems

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jhankwitz
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Platinum
Re: Hinge Conduit
jhankwitz   8/26/2014 5:50:08 PM
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As a Quality Engineer for Oster Corp. over 40 years ago, we used to build-in planned obsolescence into all products.  We established 10 year accelerated life tests and would run about 3 dozen products at a time.  Parts that failed before the 10 years would get improved, and parts that lasted beyond the 10 years would get cost reduced.

We apparently missed the mark because the Osterizer I've been using since then and using daily is still going strong, and internal inspection shows it will last quite a bit longer. 

A primary goal was to be able to retail a full-sized blender for $35.  We'd hade to cost reduce continually to adjust for inflation.  I noticed a full-sized Oster blender for sale at Costco this past weekend, still selling for $35.  I can't imagine what it looks like inside, or how much energy is wasted as heat to drive the inefficient motor.  It weighs about 1/4th of my 1970 model, and made in Mexico.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: perhaps a mod?
Cabe Atwell   8/23/2014 12:33:48 AM
I would like to say, a 19 year old dishwasher is so energy inefficient (is it gas powered?), that it would be a good idea to save the planet by recycling it. Buy a current model washer that is the most eco-friendly. No more issues keeping it running then.

 

patb2009
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Gold
perhaps a mod?
patb2009   8/22/2014 3:53:36 PM
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if the problem is the wiring through the door hinge,

 

remove that and find a new route?

 

perhaps wiring down the side and a strain relief loop?

tekochip
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Platinum
Re: Hinge Conduit
tekochip   8/22/2014 11:51:33 AM
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It's true, appliances don't last as long as they used to, and I have seen the product life specification get lower and lower, but I will not call it planned obsolescence.  Consumer demand has shifted away from product life and toward the latest technology and styling.  Why design a digital camera to last 20 years when you know full well that a one megapixel camera will not satisfy a consumer in 2014, let alone 2000?  Also, assembly costs are so cheap that it doesn't make sense to repair devices any longer, and I've even seen this on the factory floor where circuit boards are replaced because a new board is cheaper than troubleshooting the faulty one.

Take a look at the automotive marketplace; consumer demand pushed the product life higher and higher.  Consumers are willing to pay more for a vehicle that lasts longer and has a lower cost of ownership.  Product life is consumer driven just like every other feature on the specification.  If consumers will buy a product that lasts longer, I'm positive I will see that on the next specification. 

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Hinge Conduit
Nancy Golden   8/22/2014 10:31:53 AM
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Hmmm...I think you are comparing apples to oranges, Tekochip. It really depends on the products purpose as to whether it is a defined product life for a specific need versus designing in a finite life for appliances for consumer use. I agree, when designing some products it makes sense to understand the task and to design accordingly, as in the case of the WWII fighter - but printers (and washing machines and dryers and the list goes on and on) used to last for years if used and maintained properly - now you are lucky to get two years out of anything and that I believe is planned obsolescence. Remember the days when no one offered an extended warranty because quality and longevity was inherent in the design? Those days are long gone.

tekochip
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Platinum
Re: Hinge Conduit
tekochip   8/22/2014 9:02:04 AM
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I have never been involved in a design with planned obsolescence.  Yes, nearly every specification has a defined product life, but never was a design decision made based upon the device failing for the purpose of replacement.  Some may say that a defined product life is really the same thing, but without specifying a product life you may make a design decision that is far too short for the application, or on the other end of the spectrum, a design that is too expensive and outlives it's usefulness.

As an example; I have a friend of mine that owns a WWII fighter.  The big problem with the aircraft is that it was not designed to have a long service life.  The product was designed to be built quickly, with a minimum amount of resources, and to be very reliable....... for two years.  Had the good folks at Grumman built an aircraft that lasted longer it would have taken longer to design, test, build and would have required more raw materials, something that wasn't nearly as important as time to market.

Daniyal_Ali
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Platinum
Re: Proper Wiring!
Daniyal_Ali   8/22/2014 12:20:14 AM
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a2 what exactly do you mean by power shortages? Yes, there might be short circuiting if that's what you imply.

Daniyal_Ali
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Platinum
Re: Proper Wiring!
Daniyal_Ali   8/22/2014 12:14:06 AM
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You are right AnandY. The cost is a big factor, but at the end of the day it saves a lot of time, effort and money while tracing the faults. So the cost is somewhat justified.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Proper Wiring!
William K.   8/21/2014 10:06:38 PM
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I would not consider "small breakers at any joint to be good wiring practice. And while crimp splices may sometimes be a good choice I would never recommend them for any application that might ever need to be changed. The use of the correct size of "wire nuts", with the joint done correctly, is quite reliable for dry inside connections. The use of those squeeze on insulation displacing connectors is a poor choice at any time under any conditions. 

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Hinge Conduit
Nancy Golden   8/21/2014 6:30:20 PM
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Hinges used as conduit for routing wires sounds like planned obsolescence to me:

Planned obsolescence or built-in obsolescence[1] in industrial design is a policy of planning or designing a product with an artificially limited useful life, so it will become obsolete, that is, unfashionable or no longer functional after a certain period of time.[1] The rationale behind the strategy is to generate long-term sales volume by reducing the time between repeat purchases, (referred to as shortening the replacement cycle).

-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence

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