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Are Old Cars Better Than New Cars?

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Rigby5
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Gold
Re: Next up...self-driving cars
Rigby5   10/24/2014 9:25:21 PM
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@William K, I agree.  Government should not mandate things for bad drivers on the rest of us because it make us less safe than we could have been.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Next up...self-driving cars
William K.   10/24/2014 5:19:10 PM
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BOB, please do not include me in that all-encomassing "WE" who are poor drivers. I have advocated much harder driving tests for many years, but I have observed that licenses go to any who are able to pay the fee, at least in this corner of Michigan. I would also suggest that as individuals are involved in accidents that the weight of cars that they are allowed to drive be reduced, so that those folks who have the most accidents would wind up driving cars that provide the least protection. That would be fair and avoid infringing upon those of us who avoid being in collisions.

And worse than the ABS systems are the newly mandated stability control systems that are designed to protect inexperienced drivers. A better alternative would be requiring a moderate understanding of vehicle kinematics as part of the drivers test. 

As for the handling of older cars, I had a 1965 Barracuda that would allow recovery with reasonable control from all kinds of maneuvers, both intentional and inadvertant. It had a great "oversteer" characteristic. Most cars were designed with a severe "understeer" characteristic which made obstacle avoidance very difficult. But it probably save the poorest 10% of drivers when they went wrong.

Hank-4
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Silver
Re: Next up...self-driving cars
Hank-4   10/24/2014 2:40:13 PM
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CVTs are actually much simpler than the 4-speed automatic overdrive transmissions of a few years ago. Those transmissions (according to the local Aamco service center) have almost 800 moving parts. The ones that Ford built for the Taurus required an ATF change every 30,000 miles. I had four Tauruses and the transmission was the "Achilles' heel" in two of them. CVTs do not (typically) have the ability to deal with heavy torque demands. If that restriction is observed (during the design phase of a vehicle), then a CVT will outlive many other AxOD transmission designs. I have a 2009 Altima with a CVT. Without a doubt, it's the best AT that I have every had. Nissan saw fit to warrant the transmission for 100,000 miles ... so they had confidence that it would last. Ford, GM, and Chrysler are currently hyping ATs with up to 9 speeds. Can you imagine the complexity, weight, and repair expenses for such transmissions?

bob from maine
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Next up...self-driving cars
bob from maine   10/24/2014 2:22:27 PM
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I agree ABS is a bad idea for a good driver. Perhaps we could have "Graded Licenses"; demonstrate your skills and document your training and get a special license plate that permits you to own and drive an "unequipped" car at a higher rate of speed. Auto enthusiasts have expressed their desire for this type of license for years but unfortunately our nanny-state has chosen to mandate lower speed limits and equipping all cars for the least qualified driver (sound familiar?) and thus we all suffer. Still - I'd rather be surrounded by bad drivers in "nanny-state" equipped cars than bad drivers in 2 1/2 ton tanks with limited control. I do think equipping cars with blue-tooth transmitters that cause your cell phone to explode if used at speeds over 25 would be a good idea. I wonder if Washington has considered this?

Rigby5
User Rank
Gold
Re: Next up...self-driving cars
Rigby5   10/24/2014 1:54:47 PM
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@Bob from Maine, You brought up ABS and that is another good example of technology that is a bad idea.  Any good driver can stop shorter than ABS can, but ABS is only better than a really bad driver who would just lock up the brakes.  So now car companies forced us all to have ABS, even though it is not as good for most of us.  And ABS is another reason why lots of low miles cars end up in the junk yard.  It can be horrendously expensive to diagnose and repair.

Rigby5
User Rank
Gold
Re: Next up...self-driving cars
Rigby5   10/24/2014 1:50:25 PM
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@Patb2009, not sure how you can accurately measure the mileage of a hybrid because of the batteries?  If you start with them fully charged and end with them at a more discharged state, than you have not accurately measured mileage.  But I have also gotten over 60 mpg in the Mini, by traveling 50 mph on level highway.

bob from maine
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Next up...self-driving cars
bob from maine   10/24/2014 12:18:31 PM
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Automakers are desigining and selling the "latest" thing which this decade seems to be self-driving cars. We, as a society, can't seem to be bothered to actually learn to drive properly and then practice those skills. Anti-lock brakes, anti-skid, air-bags in case those things fail. We, as the buying public accept the marketeing hype that we WILL get in an accident and we WILL need Air Bags and crush zones. Having driven over a million miles with almost half of those on a motorcycle, I can confidently say I do NOT drive as though a crash is inevitable. I am solely responsible for the mechanical condition of my vehicles and their safe operation. If I find I am unable to perform the necessary maintenance, I will take my vehicle to the most qualified service center; sometimes a dealer, sometimes a local service station with a lift, and sometimes to a friend with specialized tools I lack but in the end, if my vehicle causes damage, it is my fault. As a rule, old cars did not accelerate as well, did not stop as well, did not handle as well as most newer cars and were less reliable and didn't last as long. I have a 1920 and a 1924 car, they each represent state-of-the-art manufacturing of their day and with some care have survived this far. Both represent a pretty good starting point for understanding the progress the automobile industry has made over the years. So newer is better, always, though often more inconvenient.

patb2009
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Gold
Re: Next up...self-driving cars
patb2009   10/24/2014 12:55:25 AM
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I have clocked 57 MPG driving carefully.

 

 

Rigby5
User Rank
Gold
Re: Next up...self-driving cars
Rigby5   10/23/2014 11:33:16 PM
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Constantly Variable Transmission have a horrible reputation for not lasting long.  But the Honda Insight is only rated at 42 mpg, but also is a hybrid.  It has twice the complexity and opportunities for breakdowns.  It has the weight of both gas and electric motors, as well as the batteries.  I will stick with my Mini Cooper 5 speed, rated at 44 mpg.

patb2009
User Rank
Gold
Re: Next up...self-driving cars
patb2009   10/23/2014 11:15:59 PM
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Sorry, while I know how to run a stick, i'm quite happy with my CVT,

and the 57 MPG the insight gets.

 

 

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