HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Automotive News

EV Battery Might Triple Electric Car Range

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 3 Next >
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 10/11  >  >>
Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Energy Density and Safety
Rob Spiegel   3/13/2012 3:31:52 PM
NO RATINGS

Yes, I hear the same thing about vinyl records, Nancy. Neil Young has been complaining about digital music for decades, saying it doesn't capture the warmth of an acoustic instrument. I would have a hard time going back to vinyl most because you have the change the record every 15 minutes and you can't play it in the car, which is the only place I get to really concentrate on music. 

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Energy Density and Safety
Nancy Golden   3/13/2012 3:59:42 PM
NO RATINGS

There's the ultimate trade off – convenience borne from a society that has evolved into busy lives that don't give us much time to stop and be still! Just like eating at McDonalds when a home cooked meal is sooooooooo much better. I am very guilty!

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Energy Density and Safety
Charles Murray   3/13/2012 10:03:39 PM
NO RATINGS
I have to admit, Rob, my tin ear can't tell the difference between vinyl records and digital music, anyway.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Energy Density and Safety
Rob Spiegel   3/14/2012 1:05:24 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point, Nancy. I have found CDs to be very convenient. Digital music also has another big advantage -- it doesn't deteriorate. While it may not have the full audio range and depth of vinyl, there are no pops and hissing after 1000 plays. Since vinyl is based on friction, it's pretty much inevitable the vinyl recording will lose its fine sound in time.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Energy Density and Safety
Rob Spiegel   3/14/2012 1:09:43 PM
NO RATINGS
I've actually never compared the two, Chuck. So I'm going on what musicians say. I know one thing, both CDs and vinyl sound better than tape. 

makofka
User Rank
Iron
Re: Energy Density and Safety
makofka   3/14/2012 5:32:30 PM
NO RATINGS
Really? So the CD's and Vinyl sound better than the master tapes that they were produced from? This is a new one to me.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Energy Density and Safety
Charles Murray   3/14/2012 10:14:28 PM
NO RATINGS
My rather limited record supply had very few vinyl records without scratches, pops and hissing. One of the advantages of CDs is that I can get my hands around the outer perimeter of the CD without touching the playing surface. As a result, my CDs -- even the older ones -- are in far better condition than any of my similarly-aged vinyl records.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Vinyl?
tekochip   3/15/2012 7:59:07 AM
NO RATINGS
Suddenly vinyl is becoming trendy. It's true that the sound quality was really quite good just as it was phased out, but it comes nowhere close a CD. I am a musician, and I remember the first digitally recorded, digitally mastered and digitally reproduced album I heard. Like many people it was "Brothers in Arms" by Dire Straits. The sound was breath taking, simply awe inspiring, and made me rush out and buy a better amplifier because now I needed better signal to noise performance.
Then there came MP3s. We went from dynamic range that stretched the limits of the cables carrying the signal, to the squishy sound of a Diamond Rio (I bought the first MP3 player I could get my hands on). Engineers are used to trade-offs and this was a big one, as consumers traded quality for convenience. Storage size went from 10MB a minute to 1MB or less depending on the quality you could tolerate, which was now less than the quality of vinyl. More than a decade has passed and now consumers download more music than purchase media content. Sure enough, one day my kids came to me and said that vinyl records had the best sound. We listened to some vinyl and then I put on a full digital CD and they too were awe inspired, since they had grown up listening to music through an iPod and small diaphragm speakers that they crammed into their ears.
Well, I've written too much, but it's a topic near and dear to my heart. The bottom line is that digital audio has the capability of taking our breath away with quality as good as the source, but marketplace convenience has yielded quality comparable to a cassette.
Next topic, vacuum tubes? Much like a candle, nothing warms my heart like the flickering, blue glow from a pair of 6L6s.


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Energy Density and Safety
Rob Spiegel   3/15/2012 1:35:30 PM
NO RATINGS
OK, OK, Makofka. I meant the cassette tapes that are commercially available. I've never heard a mater tape, but certainly by definition, it would be superior.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Energy Density and Safety
Rob Spiegel   3/15/2012 1:39:31 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree, Chuck. I kept my vinyl records. A few years ago, I went through them with the idea of selling them on eBay. But they were in terrible shape with scratches everywhere, so I didn't bother. Meanwhile, my CDs hold up well.

<<  <  Page 10/11  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Automotive News
A half century ago, cars were still built by people, not robots. Even on some of the countryís longest assembly lines, human workers installed windows, doors, hoods, engines, windshields, and batteries, with no robotic aid.
Automobili Lamborghini is joining the ranks of supercar makers who are moving to greener powertrains.
Toyota Motor Corp. will take another small step on the long road to fuel cell viability next year, rolling out a hydrogen-powered production sedan called the Mirai.
An MIT spin-off says itís on track to do the near-impossible task of making an electric car battery that offers three times as much energy for a fraction of the cost.
Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne has again committed the colossal sin of speaking plainly, and electric vehicle advocates arenít happy about it.
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service