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Captain Hybrid

Slideshow: Solving the Driver Distraction Dilemma

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RICKZ28
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Platinum
Blind Spot Mirrors: solutions?
RICKZ28   11/16/2012 1:45:38 PM
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Ann, I agree...why do the car manufacturers not have built-in blind spot mirrors built-in to the regular side mirrors?  I think that would be a great addition.  For myself, analyzing my driving, that's the most time I have my eyes off the road in front of me, when I'm checking my blind spots before changing lanes.  I'm very careful to check blind spots, but that's still the most near-misses for me (both city driving and highway).  I try to not drive in other's blind spots, but I regularly yield to drivers that did not check their blind spots before changing lanes (I watch them not check blind spots, and frequently no mirror check or blinker).

I've seen many people apply the aftermarket stick-on blind spot mirrors right in the "sweet spot" on the side mirrors, so it blocks their regular mirror view...perhaps doing more harm than good.  Engineers can better determine the best position for a blind spot mirror than the regular driver.

cookiejar
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Gold
Re: devil's advocate
cookiejar   11/15/2012 9:00:59 AM
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Who is responsible for the terrible controls engineering in vehicles?  Why do all the car companies seem to walk lock step with poor design practices?

At one time, you could distinguish the car's controls by their very distinctive feel and location - no need to look.  These days you have a maze of identical buttons many in long rows that take your eyes off the road while you search out the button you want.  The same applies to all the buttons on the steering wheel - you have to look down to find the right button. How hard would it be to to give distinct contours to the buttons and their locations?  Steering wheel stalks seem to be designed to activate your wipers when you want to turn and switch to high beam when you want to turn on your wipers.  The designs demand that you take your eyes off the road.

Perhaps the worse example of irresponsible design is the Prius and Mini, among others that have their speedometer in the middle of the dash.  Bodyshops report that the most common collision point on these vehicles is the front left corner.  Every other manufacturer has followed this design blunder by locating the main graphics display well away from the driver's line of sight down the road.  I've responded by mounting a stand alone GPS low on the dash right in my line of sight after many frightening surprises after glancing at the factory GPS down and well off to the right.  This modification has certainly reduced my stress level when driving in unfamiliar territory.

It's too late for the greatest safety hazard of all, the cellphone.  The horse left the barn years ago.  Daily I come across drivers slowing right down when they're on the phone and then speeding off when they get off - and then repeating.  I've even seen a driver stop in the middle of an intersection while in the middle of a conversation, oblivious to the traffic and another drive right through a red light. 

Oh the humanity!

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: devil's advocate
Ann R. Thryft   11/13/2012 4:17:04 PM
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Thanks, Chuck, that's a good summary!



Absalom
User Rank
Gold
Not a delimma, just no accountability
Absalom   11/13/2012 11:25:05 AM
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We don't hold drivers responsible for those they kill or enforce distraction laws so people, like my brother, are just going to continue to get killed. Law enfocement is focused on catching speeders proably because it's easier to prove and more fun. These days, when I drive, I keep in mind that the majority of the drivers are enemies, they have no clue what they are doing and really don't care who they kill. I drive the speed limit, keep my distance and stay alert. It's sort of like driving in Vietnam during the war but without the land mines.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Voice activated, hands free
Rob Spiegel   11/12/2012 11:33:39 PM
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I agree, Chuck, the cognitive distraction is very real. But sometimes it's had to tell what a cognitive distraction is. When radios were first introduced to cars, there was backlash from people who believed the radio would dangerously distract the driver. Yet clearly it doesn't.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: devil's advocate
Nancy Golden   11/12/2012 7:51:06 PM
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The more technological advances become available, the more problems stemming from the use of that technology becomes evident. Just look at the abuses that occur in cyberspace because it is not regulated. I think Star Trek had the right of it - we need a Prime Directive to regulate human behavior since we can't seem to do it ourselves...what is it that the Terminator said about humanity - "It is in your nature to destroy yourselves." Okay maybe I am being a bit overdramatic but I think it's a valid point...if left to our own devices we want instant gratification regardless of the safety issues that may be involved. We want to hear our radio station right now! even if we are driving in traffic and have to glance down to see the right preselect button to push - or we MUST read that text because it can't wait 5 minutes...the world might end...

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: devil's advocate
Charles Murray   11/12/2012 7:34:09 PM
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Agreed, Nancy. It's ironic that the word "smart" is associated so often with those phones. The phone itself may be smart, but the behavior isn't.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: devil's advocate
Nancy Golden   11/12/2012 4:30:09 PM
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Not only that, Elizabeth - people become desensitized to whatever is serving to direct their attention. Those LED lights will work the first few times to redirect a person's attention - until they get used to them. As Charles said - the technology to fix technology doesn't work well...it's a losing proposition. If everyone lost a family member in a car accident due to someone texting or looking at their "Smart" phone (not very smart if you ask me since it causes such irresponsible behavior) then I think that ban on technology devices would pass.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: devil's advocate
Charles Murray   11/9/2012 7:10:04 PM
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What we have here, Liz, is technology that's meant to fix a problem that technology caused in the first place. The obvious solution is not to let a lot of this stuff into the car in the first place. Unfortunately, that's never going to happen.

SparkyWatt
User Rank
Platinum
Mind on the road
SparkyWatt   11/9/2012 2:07:04 PM
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I was amazed by how many of these solutions, and the subsequent discussion, confused "eyes on the road" with "mind on the road".  They take the need to look away from the road away, or remind you to look back.  Instead they distract you with your eyes in place.  Heads up displays are a perfect example of this.  If you have 20 pieces of information popping at you, it hardly matters whether it is on your dashboard or on your windshield.

Right approach, reduce interaction, reduce interruption.  For example, a reminder to get your oil changed should only appear when the vehicle is stopped.  Calendar reminders and other non-critical items should not even be available while the engine is on.

To that end, voice command is a good thing.  However, audio cues and flashing lights should be limited to critical matters.  Nothing should grab your attention unless it is critical (e.g. you are about to run out of gas).

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