HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Automotive News

Battery-Electric Vehicles: It's a Question of Trickle-Down

View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
patb2009
User Rank
Gold
Re: a long slow road
patb2009   8/5/2014 11:58:23 PM
NO RATINGS
If we switch the Entire US Vehicle fleet to EVs, to a first order we need 

30% more generating capacity, however, Modern LED lighting is destroying

about 20% of demand and Solar PV is starting to destroy about 20% of daytime demand.

 

Having Cars that commute to a work place with a big Solar PV array makes for an ideal

load match and can be a low quality demand, so you can switch off the car chargers

when you need the power, or turn them up, when you need to soak up power.

 

I suspect in 5 years, most people will have a EV and a big solar array.

Trenth
User Rank
Gold
Re: a long slow road
Trenth   7/24/2014 2:57:26 PM
NO RATINGS
What do you mean?  Power shortage?  For a plug in hybrid, it just becomes a hybrid that you add fuel to.   That really doesn't save hydrocarbon fuels, but it costs no more.  It could act as a home generator as well.  


a2
User Rank
Gold
Re: a long slow road
a2   7/24/2014 2:48:21 AM
NO RATINGS
@trenth: Well what happens if there is a power shortage? What sort of a battery capacity does it hold ? 

Trenth
User Rank
Gold
Re: a long slow road
Trenth   7/23/2014 10:04:56 PM
NO RATINGS
Yougot it, it's the first 30-40 miles.  The electric only cars are not that great an idea at the moment.   Plug in hybrids are the best idea for now.  BTW, the LEAF has sold over 100,000 cars world wide.  That's better than the plug in hybrids.  The early Prius was just an efficient gas car with interesting electric details.  It's the plug in electric and hybrid cars that will make the difference.  Already the Volt's 30 miles is plenty for a plug in hybrid.  The problem is the weight and cost of the backup hydrocarbon generators.  


CharlesM
User Rank
Silver
Re: a long slow road
CharlesM   7/23/2014 1:47:30 PM
NO RATINGS
The Volt won't fit everyone's needs and budget, no. (What car can?) It's definitely all about the first 40 miles per day, as you rightly point out. And the number of generator miles after that (a lot) that it would take to erase that benefit. And the electric propulsion experience that continues in any mode. And the low maintenance. That's about all.

But few know much about the car. I get odd and simple questions all the time. "Does it use gas?" "How far can it go?" "How can it keep going after the battery's dead?" Etc.

Until I owned one, even I thought that the depleted battery becomes just dead weight until it's recharged. No; it still fuels the car as a high current buffer and just gets recharged in bursts from the generator to its same average state of charge. That's why it's always an electric car. It's a little complicated, true, but the general public is mostly oblivious. Things won't stay this way forever. (Especially after the Supreme Court requires everyone to buy one! ; >) ) 

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: a long slow road
naperlou   7/23/2014 12:49:25 PM
NO RATINGS
CharlesM, of course you are correct. On the other hand he would not get the per mile cost he is so enamoured with.  I should have been more clear.  He is very happy that he almost never has to use the generator, which would change is cost metric.  If he does need to drive somewhere distant, then he does have the ability to do that.  Frankly, if he was using the generator a lot, he might be better off with a Cruze (which is about the same size). 

CharlesM
User Rank
Silver
Re: Wishes don't make it work
CharlesM   7/23/2014 9:11:17 AM
NO RATINGS
And what would happen if the supreme court decided to mandate all electric cars? That court answers to nobody, in practice, although in theory they do answer to the legislature, I think.

{FACEPALM} Uh, almost. The judicial branch doesn't write laws. And can anyone imagine this Supreme Court (or any in history) going out of its way to rule in favor of clean air at the expense of "individual liberties, freedoms," etc.?  And what lawmaker would try to do that? It would be direct political suicide and clearly and obviously unconstitutional.

CharlesM
User Rank
Silver
Re: a long slow road
CharlesM   7/23/2014 9:00:23 AM
NO RATINGS
 On the other hand, he [Volt driver] still has to recharge each night.  With an ICE, if I am low on fuel, I can pull into a gasoline station, one of over 100,000 in the US, and fill up in minutes. 

Naperlou, I'm sure you know better, but this kind of propagation of common misconceptions illustrates one of the hurdles plug-in hybrids have to overcome in order to gain acceptance. The Volt doesn't ever have to be plugged in. Your neighbor can just drive from gas station to gas station, the same way you do, if he chooses to skip getting 100 or so MPGe from cheap electricity, and instead get only 35-40 MPG from gasoline.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Wishes don't make it work
William K.   7/22/2014 6:24:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Charles, you are correct, although I am sure that if they could do it they would. But so far voting is our only defense against really bad ideas. And what would happen if the supreme court decided to mandate all electric cars? That court answers to nobody, in practice, although in theory they do answer to the legislature, I think.

But just becaause something is a really bad idea does not mean that the legislators will not embrace it. We have seen that a few times.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Wishes don't make it work
Charles Murray   7/22/2014 6:17:00 PM
NO RATINGS
It's easier for political leaders to push the auto companies to meet mandates, William K. If they pushed consumers -- for example, if they demanded that all second cars were electric -- they'd lose votes.

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Automotive News
Some cars are more reliable than others, but even the vehicles at the bottom of this year’s Consumer Reports reliability survey are vastly better than those of 20 years ago in the key areas of powertrain and hardware, experts said this week.
As it does every year, Consumers Union recently surveyed its members on the reliability of their vehicles. This year, it collected data on approximately 1.1 million cars and trucks, categorizing the members’ likes and dislikes, not only of their vehicles, but of the vehicle sub-systems, as well.
Every year, ultra-luxury automakers roll out their best and brightest at the Geneva Motor Show in Switzerland. This year was no different.
A few weeks ago, Ford Motor Co. quietly announced that it was rolling out a new wrinkle to the powerful safety feature called stability control, adding even more lifesaving potential to a technology that has already been very successful.
If any big company can make a sudden and successful leap into the business of building cars, Apple Inc. would have to be considered the most likely candidate.
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Mar 30 - Apr3, Getting Hands-On with Cypress’ PSoC
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service