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Nissan Rolls Out Its 2nd Electric Vehicle

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Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/4/2014 3:17:35 AM
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"Is there a major difference as such ? No alternatives for it ? "

Saji, difference in the same all volumes won't carry the same weight. For example a truck of empty bottles weight much less than a truck of rocks or sand.

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/4/2014 3:14:27 AM
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"Good to see the popularity for Harley Davidson remains or gets better from time to time. It's a positive sign indeed "

A2, Harley Davidson, Enfield etc may be there for a long time without much shake due to their high pricing and quality.

patb2009
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
patb2009   7/4/2014 1:18:19 AM
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FEDEX residential uses smaller trucks rather then the big Panel trucks.

These would be ideal for Postal workers.  I actually don't know why

the USPS didn't already convert their entire fleet to electrics.

The average USPS delivery route is 13 miles, the vehicles return to the post office twice/day, the post office is an ideal bureaucratic fleet manager.

 

Given the very low speed of the USPS fleet, you can use cheap motors and lead acid batteries.

 

 

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/2/2014 4:54:27 AM
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" It depends on the weight of their cargo. As he points out, a concrete contractor couldn't use this. This vehicle is best compared to the Ford Transit Connect. A concrete contractor would be unlikely to use that, too."

Charles, I understood the fact. I meant in real situation of carrying heavy items for factories and outside delivery.  It's good in delivering low density items

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/2/2014 4:51:02 AM
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"You won't be filling it with bottles of mineral water, but you can use it for delivery of spare parts where the ratio of item/packing material is high (ever recieved samples of electronic components? you'll see what I mean). It is a solution for those applications where, as they say in the air-force, you "cube out before you weigh out"."

Battar, in that aspects you are right. It's good to carry less dense materials (cotton, empty bottles, spare parts etc)

Charles Murray
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JC08 test cycle
Charles Murray   6/30/2014 6:30:25 PM
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We've received e-mails saying that the e-NV200 gets 120 miles to a charge, not less than the Leaf gets, as we reported. So let's reiterate: the 120-mile figure that's been reported in many stories is based on Japan's JC08 test cycle. In contrast, the Leaf's 84-mile range is based on an EPA rating. Since this vehicle uses the same powertrain as the Leaf and weighs more, it is unlikely to get a greater range rating than the Leaf, according to the Nissan spokesman we talked to.

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   6/27/2014 2:58:37 AM
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"The Nissan delivery truck would be better suited for the light duty delivery of groceries, food caterers, flowers, medical test specimens and the like."

Rick, you are right and they may be meant for transporting low weight materials.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Smart move from Nissan
Elizabeth M   6/24/2014 6:47:49 AM
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Great ideas, naperlou. I think there is a whole market for these types of vehicles already out there, as you point out, and it would be a win for both EV makers and the companies using them.

Pubudu
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Pubudu   6/23/2014 2:02:07 PM
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Yes a.saji, when it comes to the business it is important to calculate the return on investment and the opportunity cost rather than cost.

Pubudu
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Pubudu   6/23/2014 1:56:58 PM
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I also agree with you RICKZ28 this will best match for the small medium entrepreneurs. This vehicle definitely helps them to go for the next step of their business.  

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