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Captain Hybrid

Nissan Rolls Out Its 2nd Electric Vehicle

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Elizabeth M
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Smart move from Nissan
Elizabeth M   6/19/2014 6:11:12 AM
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This is definitely a smart move for Nissan and a great option for small fleets of cargo vans in cities where pollution and noise from these type of vehicles is a big problem. It's also quite a nice-looking vehicle! This is the way forward for electrics. It shows Nissan really thinking of the best markets for new EVs before it just puts out a new car. Well done, Nissan.

naperlou
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Re: Smart move from Nissan
naperlou   6/19/2014 10:59:06 AM
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Cap'n, I have to agree with Elizabeth.  Many of these new technologies (EV, natural gas powered, fuel cell) for which a "fuel" distribution system is not employed are better suited to fleet use in limited geographic area.  As I have mentioned before, a local concrete contractor is converting its fleet to natural (really LP) gas.  Government should also do this.  Especially local government.  They all refuel at their own stations and operate in a limited geographic area.

Charles Murray
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Re: Smart move from Nissan
Charles Murray   6/19/2014 11:20:18 AM
I agree with both of you. I've been writing about electric vehicles since 1988, and for at least the last 20 years, automotive engineers and industry analysts have been telling me that the best application of electric powertrain tech is in fleet-based delivery trucks. Why? Because fleets, unlike individuals, are predictable. The predictability factor -- how many miles you will drive every day -- is hugely important. For many individuals, electric powertrains don't fit their lifestyle because they have occasional -- even rare -- longer trips. And they don't want to rent a car after they've paid $30K for their EV. But many (not all) fleets know where they'll be every day and how much time they have to charge up. 

naperlou
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Re: Smart move from Nissan
naperlou   6/19/2014 11:59:22 AM
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Chuck, another interesting twist on fleet delivery vehicle usage is that these tend to be start-stop heavy applications.  EVs are perfect for that.

Charles Murray
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Re: Smart move from Nissan
Charles Murray   6/19/2014 12:04:30 PM
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Yes, naperlou, starting and stopping tends to favor an electric powertrain. Regenerative braking definitely helps there. Whereas gasoline-burning vehicles tend to have mpg's on the highway, pure electric cars do better in the city.

NadineJ
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Re: Smart move from Nissan
NadineJ   6/20/2014 12:46:27 PM
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It would be interesting to see if services like Amazon Fresh or Google Shopping Express, and their sub-contractors, would switch their fleets to something like this.  It's a popular service.  There are so many on the road.  It would be great if they used more EVs.

 

RichardBradleySmith
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Re: Smart move from Nissan
RichardBradleySmith   6/20/2014 2:43:49 PM
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I know two Google Shoppers and they drive Prius when they can get Google cars. They drive from San Jose to SF just to do their routes somedays. Drivers are the key problem here the details of which are a long discussion. Safeway dot com drives trucks so vans won't do. Google is working on the driver  problem. Amazon has the logistic puzzle solved. Telsa will save us from the range problem with hot swap. Together they will form GAT which will save everyone from wasting their lives shopping and finally replace the US Postal Service. The good life is just around the corner!

Elizabeth M
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Re: Smart move from Nissan
Elizabeth M   6/24/2014 6:47:49 AM
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Great ideas, naperlou. I think there is a whole market for these types of vehicles already out there, as you point out, and it would be a win for both EV makers and the companies using them.

Charles Murray
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Re: Smart move from Nissan
Charles Murray   6/19/2014 11:21:39 AM
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Yes, I agree with you about the look of the vehicle, Liz. Very impressive.

Pubudu
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Re: Smart move from Nissan
Pubudu   6/23/2014 1:47:43 PM
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Yes Elizabeth, as I know this Nisssan is the first company, in the automobile industry who introduces the electric vehicle for industrial purposes.  This will be great news for the small medium enterprises for sure. 

Mydesign
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Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   6/20/2014 12:34:30 AM
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"Auto industry analysts have long contended that electric powertrains are a good fit for delivery trucks. In delivery trucks, driving routes are short and predictable, making the limited range of EVs less of an issue. Also, fleet customers like the fact that operating costs of EVs are lower than those of gas-burning vehicles."

Charles, you are right about pollution and operational cost of EVs, but what about the power? Will it able to carry a high load cargo within the city for a whole day.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Cabe Atwell   6/20/2014 1:15:02 AM
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Seems Harley Davidson is getting in on the whole EV trend as well with their new LiveWire superbike.

NadineJ
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
NadineJ   6/20/2014 12:52:11 PM
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I don't see Harley-Davidson as an innovator.  I'm curious to ride the actual bike when it's ready.  But, knowing Harley, when is the biggest question. Speed to market is not their strength.

Electric bicycles have been up trending for a while now. The prices are finally coming down so they're more popular.

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   6/23/2014 4:55:28 AM
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"Seems Harley Davidson is getting in on the whole EV trend as well with their new LiveWire superbike"

Cabe, power requirement for goods carrier and bullet is different.

a.saji
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
a.saji   6/23/2014 5:06:40 AM
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@Mydesign: Is there a major difference as such ? No alternatives for it ? 

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/4/2014 3:17:35 AM
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"Is there a major difference as such ? No alternatives for it ? "

Saji, difference in the same all volumes won't carry the same weight. For example a truck of empty bottles weight much less than a truck of rocks or sand.

a2
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
a2   6/23/2014 5:49:54 AM
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Good to see the popularity for Harley Davidson remains or gets better from time to time. It's a positive sign indeed 

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/4/2014 3:14:27 AM
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"Good to see the popularity for Harley Davidson remains or gets better from time to time. It's a positive sign indeed "

A2, Harley Davidson, Enfield etc may be there for a long time without much shake due to their high pricing and quality.

RICKZ28
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
RICKZ28   6/20/2014 4:28:19 PM
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The Nissan electric delivery truck would not be heavy duty enough for many trades' workers, as their tools, equipment and supplies weigh too much...especially plumbers and concrete guys.  Trades guys have 3/4 ton or 1 ton trucks, generally not 1/2 ton.  The Nissan delivery truck would be better suited for the light duty delivery of groceries, food caterers, flowers, medical test specimens and the like.

William K.
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
William K.   6/20/2014 4:45:15 PM
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Rick Z, trades applications are much different from delivery operations, and this vehicle is described as a delivery vehicle. Trades people mostly go to a work site and stay there and work. Either electric or IC vehicles are good for that kind of operations. Of course those repairmen who never ever have the needed parts in their truck are a totally different story. Really, we could do very well without them even pretending to be in the business.

Pubudu
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Pubudu   6/23/2014 1:56:58 PM
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I also agree with you RICKZ28 this will best match for the small medium entrepreneurs. This vehicle definitely helps them to go for the next step of their business.  

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   6/27/2014 2:58:37 AM
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"The Nissan delivery truck would be better suited for the light duty delivery of groceries, food caterers, flowers, medical test specimens and the like."

Rick, you are right and they may be meant for transporting low weight materials.

patb2009
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
patb2009   7/4/2014 1:18:19 AM
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FEDEX residential uses smaller trucks rather then the big Panel trucks.

These would be ideal for Postal workers.  I actually don't know why

the USPS didn't already convert their entire fleet to electrics.

The average USPS delivery route is 13 miles, the vehicles return to the post office twice/day, the post office is an ideal bureaucratic fleet manager.

 

Given the very low speed of the USPS fleet, you can use cheap motors and lead acid batteries.

 

 

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/4/2014 3:20:10 AM
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"FEDEX residential uses smaller trucks rather then the big Panel trucks. These would be ideal for Postal workers.  I actually don't know why the USPS didn't already convert their entire fleet to electrics. The average USPS delivery route is 13 miles, the vehicles return to the post office twice/day, the post office is an ideal bureaucratic fleet manager. Given the very low speed of the USPS fleet, you can use cheap motors and lead acid batteries."

Patb2009, it's a good option for mail and courier/parcel delivery. Since fuel costs are less, cost effective too.

patb2009
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
patb2009   7/4/2014 1:59:53 PM
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The brits have a half a century experience with electric milk floats.

For anything with short range and low speed, they should all be changing to electrics.

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/7/2014 5:22:40 AM
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"The brits have a half a century experience with electric milk floats. For anything with short range and low speed, they should all be changing to electrics."

Patb2009, you are right. its good in delivering low volume/weight to a short distance.

patb2009
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
patb2009   7/7/2014 1:43:35 PM
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It's not good, it's better, significantly better.

For any trip under 30 miles roundtrip, electric is significantly better.

What I don't understand is why the USPS never switched their whole fleet to

electrics back in the 70's.

 

The average mail truck goes 13 miles round trip, the average speed is only some 4 MPH, and the peak speed is only about 35 MPH,  There is almost zero requirement for highway speed  and these are operated from a fixed base by a bunch of procedure oriented, operational bureaucrats.  By going to EV the fleet maintenance becomes much simpler, and

given the short ranges you don't really need complex charging systems, just run 48 V DC out to the slots,  and a simple charge monitoring circuit to keep the batteries from cooking.

 

You have time during lunch to top off, and you have all night to slow charge, this is ideal.

 

 

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/11/2014 2:16:08 AM
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"For any trip under 30 miles roundtrip, electric is significantly better. What I don't understand is why the USPS never switched their whole fleet to electrics back in the 70's."

Patb2009, it's all depends up on the battery power and availability of charging points on the way.

patb2009
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
patb2009   7/11/2014 6:44:23 PM
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That's why i don't understand why it didn't happen to the USPS in the 70's.

Battery was more then adequate and the short range  was 

ideal for a return every night to charge.

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/16/2014 12:34:51 AM
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"That's why i don't understand why it didn't happen to the USPS in the 70's. Battery was more then adequate and the short range  was ideal for a return every night to charge."

Patb2009, what is this USPS story in 1970?

patb2009
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
patb2009   7/16/2014 1:29:07 AM
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apparently in 1974, UPS ran a small demo fleet of Electric converted jeeps.

 

https://about.usps.com/who-we-are/postal-history/electric-vehicles.pdf

 

Had they stuck that out, they'd be saving a couple billion a year.

 

 

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/22/2014 11:35:08 PM
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Patb2009, thanks for the link and details.

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/16/2014 12:36:47 AM
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"Battery was more then adequate and the short range  was ideal for a return every night to charge."

Patb2009, if required on the way it can get charged through various charging stations too.

Charles Murray
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Charles Murray   6/20/2014 4:36:01 PM
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RickZ28's comment below answers your question pretty succinctly, MyDesign.  It depends on the weight of their cargo. As he points out, a concrete contractor couldn't use this. This vehicle is best compared to the Ford Transit Connect. A concrete contractor would be unlikely to use that, too.

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/2/2014 4:54:27 AM
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" It depends on the weight of their cargo. As he points out, a concrete contractor couldn't use this. This vehicle is best compared to the Ford Transit Connect. A concrete contractor would be unlikely to use that, too."

Charles, I understood the fact. I meant in real situation of carrying heavy items for factories and outside delivery.  It's good in delivering low density items

Battar
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Battar   6/22/2014 2:01:35 AM
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Mydesign,

                For many applications there isn't much of a correlation between volume and weight of cargo. You won't be filling it with bottles of mineral water, but you can use it for delivery of spare parts where the ratio of item/packing material is high (ever recieved samples of electronic components? you'll see what I mean). It is a solution for those applications where, as they say in the air-force, you "cube out before you weigh out".

fdos
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
fdos   6/23/2014 1:21:22 AM
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@battar: Well the normal theory is to make vehicles lighter as possible since that will reduce the fuel consumption

a.saji
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
a.saji   6/23/2014 5:10:06 AM
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If you are looking for an alternative just because of the cost itself, I feel its not a good ploy. True cost plays a major role but it should also collaborate with quality as well. 

Pubudu
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Pubudu   6/23/2014 2:02:07 PM
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Yes a.saji, when it comes to the business it is important to calculate the return on investment and the opportunity cost rather than cost.

Mydesign
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Re: Power for carrying High loads
Mydesign   7/2/2014 4:51:02 AM
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"You won't be filling it with bottles of mineral water, but you can use it for delivery of spare parts where the ratio of item/packing material is high (ever recieved samples of electronic components? you'll see what I mean). It is a solution for those applications where, as they say in the air-force, you "cube out before you weigh out"."

Battar, in that aspects you are right. It's good to carry less dense materials (cotton, empty bottles, spare parts etc)

order23
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Ugly Ugly Ugly
order23   6/20/2014 2:11:09 PM
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I was really excited about the leaf, until I saw it, what an ugly vehicle.

Now they come out with this ! It's even uglier. What were they thinking !!

Why not make something along the lines of the Altima. Now there's a nice looking car, so Nissan can do it. Shan't be buying Nissan electric any time soon, sorry.

 

Charles Murray
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JC08 test cycle
Charles Murray   6/30/2014 6:30:25 PM
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We've received e-mails saying that the e-NV200 gets 120 miles to a charge, not less than the Leaf gets, as we reported. So let's reiterate: the 120-mile figure that's been reported in many stories is based on Japan's JC08 test cycle. In contrast, the Leaf's 84-mile range is based on an EPA rating. Since this vehicle uses the same powertrain as the Leaf and weighs more, it is unlikely to get a greater range rating than the Leaf, according to the Nissan spokesman we talked to.

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