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Slideshow: Volkswagen Takes a Deep Dive Into Electrics

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Rigby5
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Re: Battery costs
Rigby5   4/21/2015 6:34:04 PM
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@GeoOT, I did not know about the early Ford seat belts.  I had a Volvo 244 for a long time for that very reason of them being so safe.  It also was very practical because it had a lot of room and big trunk.  Wish they still sold them.

GeoOT
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Re: Battery costs
GeoOT   4/21/2015 2:23:28 AM
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Your comments on seat belts need further information.  Ford was the first company to offer seat belts for the US market.  That was as a dealer-installed option on 1956 models.  That year's models also offered the first interior with "improved" safety features, i.e. a padded dashboard and a deep center steering wheel.  Sweden made 3 point seat belts mandatory in 1958 for the 1959 and onward models.  I remember a 1969 or 70 article in Road and Track that said that for auto crashes in Sweden 1959 to 1969 there had been zero deaths for passengers strapped in with 3 point belts and speeds 50 mph or under.

 

Over the long term, the safest car by far during the 20th century was the Volvo 240 series.  No one else got even close to their survival rate until manufacturers got into the IIHS Safety ratings race during recent years.

JRoque
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VW EVs
JRoque   10/26/2013 6:42:05 PM
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Ah yes, VW never dissapoints with it's timely - mostly monthly - press releases of the inminent arrival of their shiny new electric vehicles. They are ALWAYS 15 months or more away from arriving to US markets. It's a rolling press release where they just change the dates on it. I bet they have a Javascript agent that does that for them - that's as much effort as they're willing to put into anything EV related.

This is the second, nearly idential post that I've made on the subject. I wish I had the time to track VW EV press releases but think of this post the next time you see a VW announcement. If it says VW next EV, I call major BS on that. I estimate that it won't be before 2015 when VW will be forced to enter the EV market that we will have an electric option from them. And even then, they'll send them to California just so they can sell their ICE products there.

JR

Charles Murray
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Re: Battery costs
Charles Murray   9/26/2013 6:53:29 PM
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Good point, Rigby5. I think you'll hear a lot about battery replacement costs in a few years, as those Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt batteries start to near end of life.  

Charles Murray
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Re: What about Audi??
Charles Murray   9/24/2013 5:57:09 PM
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Here's a link to the story about Volkswagen's 261-mpg plug-in hybrid.

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1366&doc_id=260529

Charles Murray
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Re: What about Audi??
Charles Murray   9/23/2013 6:06:45 PM
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Good point, Nadine. It was Volkswagen earlier this year that announced it would soon roll out a plug-in hybrid production car called the XL1 that would have a 261-mpg fuel efficiency rating. I don't believe it will have a 261 mpg after the EPA rates it, but it's still impressive.  

NadineJ
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Re: What about Audi??
NadineJ   9/21/2013 11:21:09 AM
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I remember reading about the A3 e-Tron a while ago.  It's interesting that VW brings more innovation forward than Audi today.  In the past, the company used Audi to introduce new technology that trickled down to VW.

As more "affordable" EV's are created, I'm keeping an eye on the after-market effect.  Maintenance costs and resale values are very important in this price range.  At higher price points, it's a little less important to the consumer. 

Rigby5
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Re: Battery costs
Rigby5   9/20/2013 2:36:28 PM
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@LetoAtreidsll, of course there are situations where having a larger car helps, such as when you hit a small car.  However, against a solid wall, a small car will win every time.  What you are forgetting is the strength to weight ratio.  It is the reason an ant can carry 100 times its own weight, and we can't.  Take a 1973 Cadillac, and it will be completely destroyed hitting a wall at 60 mph.  That is because the weight is so much greater than the strength of the structual members, and there is no way to absorb all that energy.  Take a Fiat 850 Spyder in comparison, and there is hardly any energy to absorb.  You can lift the engine with one hand.  The long front end has nothing in it, so it can easily absorb all the energy.  Smaller objects alway inherently have a better strength to weight ratio, inherently.  That can never change.  It is the weight of the back of the vehicle that crushes the front.  The lighter you can make the back, the less force on the front. 

The problem with most cars is that they discover that in order to have a larger engine, for more power, then the transmission, frame, suspension, etc. then also have to be larger to hold the extra weight, and you end up often will less effective power.  Minimalism actually is far more successful.  The only limitation to this is that the mass of the driver is constant, so you can't get too small.

LetoAtreidesII
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Re: Battery costs
LetoAtreidesII   9/20/2013 1:47:01 PM
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Yes size of the vechile and how it is built matter completely.   A smaller car EV or not will be more damaged than a larger car when hit.

Now I am not talking apples to apples because I am now comparing a true SUV ford explorer and such to a small car but that is what we are discussing if a car size helps in safty.

 Let take an every present risk were I live a 150# deer runs across the road and you hit it a 55mph.  This will total a smaller car, happens multiple time a day here. With multiple fatility a year in PA from just this.  When a larger vechiles hit this deer far less damage is incurred and far fewer but  still not zero fatilies.

This is can happen now matter how safe you drive.  Even if you avoid driving at night.

if you take a large enough object A semi both could be crushed, but a larger vechile allows more survivability that would crushs a smaller car.

Yes the 64.5 Stang was first car as I remember with any seat belt but it was just a lap belt.

I feel a Rush song coming on "Red Barchetta"

Rigby5
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Re: Battery costs
Rigby5   9/20/2013 1:17:47 PM
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@Reliabilityguru: Sorry but as long as IC engine exhaust is toxic, and it is, the EPA has all the authority it needs.  I really enjoyed 60's car more than any other era, but I also usually got 30 mpg or better back then.  Again, my favorite cars were the Fiat 850, Nash Metropolitan, Triumph Spitfire, Corvair, VW, Austin Healy Sprite, etc., and these were better cars than they make now.  Regardless of Ralph Nader, they were also safer.

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