HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Automotive News

Top 15 Most Important Auto Safety Technologies

View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I couldn't help but think...
William K.   5/26/2016 12:30:45 PM
NO RATINGS
My reference to Volvos was based on their being marketed as a "safety first" car, rather than any actual safety value. No, the current ones may not be as safe, actually, but that was not my point. Safety does not sell, because it is not the most important feature to most people. Aside from that, I still maintain that most lawmakers are there for the power, not to serve the public. I see evidence of this almost every hour.

FinnickyFinn
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I couldn't help but think...
FinnickyFinn   5/24/2016 10:54:42 AM
NO RATINGS
Have you looked at how dismal the training requirements are for getting a license in the US? I think this is out of pure necessity to keep the nation going given the sad state of public transit.

As far as Volvo's go...many do not drive them because they cannot afford them. Also, their newer models are not as safe as the old big chunky ones were.

FinnickyFinn
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tire pressure
FinnickyFinn   5/24/2016 10:51:23 AM
NO RATINGS
Is inflating tires part of the mandatory course work for getting a license? It is not and thus requiring this knowledge is asking too much. I think it should be part of driver training as well as filling up and checklng fluid levels. By the way, the guide is for how to locate the info on the tire.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I couldn't help but think...
William K.   5/24/2016 9:13:18 AM
NO RATINGS
The expensive and most OVER rated development is that stability control, which only benefits the most inexperienced and reckless drivers. Knowing how to handle a skid used to be a driver training subject, and is not far behind knowing how to apply the brakes in value. That skid-trip-roll-crash sequence is mostly caused by driving way to fast for the conditions, which is usually caused by a lack of understanding of the very most basic kinematics. So why force all drivers to pay for an expensive feature that they will never use?

Next, we have those expensive and dangerous airbags, which, even bofore the Takata fiasco were killing people? We already had seatbelts, a proven mechanism that completely aside from reducing injuries during collisions also has the secondary benefit of helping a driver maintain control during sudden motions, such as big bumps, sudden sideways motions, and sudden hard braking.

The fact is that these things are mandated because that is how the profit is made. Safety does not sell, if it did most folks would be driving Volvos.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tire pressure
William K.   5/24/2016 9:01:39 AM
NO RATINGS
No "guide on how to inflate the tires"? If a person does not know how to inflate tires and what pressure to inflate them to then they should not be driving. It is that simple! An understanding of what is going on with the vehicle is part of safe driving. The tire pressure monitoring system was a great addition, but that stupid icon in a fire-orange color is a poor choice for delivering the warning.  If people can't read then why are they allowed to drive?

wst2
User Rank
Iron
Re: I couldn't help but think...
wst2   5/23/2016 2:10:12 PM
NO RATINGS
My thoughts also. I read through the list and was thinking it needed a companion 'cost of each requirement'. Also, seat belts are very reliable, but all of the electronic safety features just add to the problems in keeping a car operating. I'm had multiple problems with TPS when the weather gets cold. I guess I just don't like the powers that be mandating more and more and making the auto less and less affordable.

patb2009
User Rank
Platinum
Safety Tech.
patb2009   5/17/2016 11:18:49 PM
NO RATINGS
1) I'd put the rearview mirror as #1... That's used all the time and it has dramatically reduced acidents, especially since the DoT/NHTSA started mandating three rearview mirrors.

 

2) Head Rests. The head rest dramatically reduced whiplash injury and fatal neck injuries.

 

3) Cupholders were added like mad in the 80's because it was a simple low cost way to

add utility to the "Live/Work/Drive : experience.  American manufacturers went crazy

adding cupholders while the japanese drove quality.

Reuven
User Rank
Bronze
Turn signals
Reuven   5/16/2016 9:34:19 PM
NO RATINGS
One of my pet peeves is the poor design of turn signals.  It is hard enough to get drivers to use them, only to have them not visible when they are used.  Too many cars have the front turn signals mounted right next the headlights.  At night the bright headlights overwhelm the turn signals and you cannot see them.   They need to be mounted far enough from the headlights to be seen.  If proper seperation between the turn signals and the the headlights was designed into the car it would not be necessary to use tricks like turning off the headlight when the turn signal was on.

 It also helps to have the rear turn signals equiped with amber lenses, not clear or red lenses.  The idea is to make the turn signals as bright and color intense as possible, and to have as much contrast with other lights and colors on the car. Led bulbs that go all the way off are another item that helps people note the turn signals.

I always have trouble understanding why these simple ideas are not followed. It seems like another case of designers having more power over engineers.

Rick DeMeis
User Rank
Silver
Re: Cannot see the list
Rick DeMeis   5/16/2016 4:07:43 PM
NO RATINGS
Finn is right. No reason to not have them all on a page or two rather than trying to boost clicks on the site using a slideshow.

tluxon
User Rank
Platinum
I couldn't help but think...
tluxon   5/16/2016 12:49:17 PM
NO RATINGS
how much safer cars will be when we can no longer afford them or aren't allowed to drive them.  "Progress" is intriguing.

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Automotive News
If there’s a rule of thumb in modern engine design, it’s that smaller is better. Smaller engines weigh less, burn less fuel, and simplify packaging.
Higher prices and glitzy new technologies don’t necessarily make for better automotive headlights, a first-ever study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety suggests.
A February letter from federal regulators to Google Inc. appears to have sent automakers and tier-one suppliers scrambling to accelerate their investments in autonomous vehicle technology.
Tesla Motors’ $35,000, 200-mile electric car may not revolutionize the auto industry by itself, but it could serve as a starting point for a long, steady climb to a day when half of the world’s vehicles will be plug-ins.
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7 | 8 | 9 | 10


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2016 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service