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Freescale's Pressure Monitors Can Save Lives … and Tires

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Mr. Wirtel
User Rank
Gold
Remote information gathering
Mr. Wirtel   5/5/2015 8:49:38 PM
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 I think it is bizarre that the low tire data would be sent to a remote location so, "the driver will not have to monitor 18 gages." So you have as many gages as you need and a warning light or sound to alert the driver when one is out of the acceptable range. I want the driver to know at once. How many gages and/or dials does a pilot have to monitor? Who would want to fly on an airline where the pilot has to be alerted by ground control when there is a problem on board?

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: OTR Truck Tire Pressure Monitoring
William K.   4/29/2015 6:50:35 PM
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Pelengr is right about the drivers doing the inspections, and it makes a lot of sense for them to do them because truck tires are expensive. So most drivers do take good care of their trucks.

Now for a means to check the loading, that gets easy and simple: just have a sensor monitir tire tread temperature, or sidewall temperature. I have been doing that by feel for many years and it is easy to tell which side of a car or trailer is more heavily loaded just by feeling the temperature after driving for half an hour or so. Mounting thesensors in uniform positions might be a challenge but it should be possible. Then comes the question about the value of that information, given that trucks do get weighed, and those scales are more accurate than my "qualitative" temperature method. bUT it would be able to warn about leaking or failing tires.

pelengr17
User Rank
Silver
Re: OTR Truck Tire Pressure Monitoring
pelengr17   4/29/2015 5:47:37 PM
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I agree.  Especially as companies start using E-Logs and the expected coming of government requirements of E-Logs, why not make this tech compatible with these systems.  Let the driver know he has a tire low.  To your point, inspections, even daily, won't prevent all catastrophic failures.  A driver could catch a nail or a cord breaks when they hit something in the road and a tire will slowly or quickly fail.  That not only causes other problems on the road, it also costs the owners money.  A failure on the road usually means either a service coming out to the location or a stop at a shop either of which can be expensive and cost a new tire when one has been shredded.

tucsonics
User Rank
Silver
Re: OTR Truck Tire Pressure Monitoring
tucsonics   4/29/2015 11:02:06 AM
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My 2012 Toyota Camry LE has tire pressure sensors linked to the information display on the dash. It shows the 4 tire pressures, but alas, it doesn't tell me which tire is which. So I have to manually check the 4 tires when it indicates one is lower than the others. I routinely check the sensor display before leaving the house.

The other problem is just how accurate the sensors actually are. If I have one tire that is 1 psi lower or more than the other three, I ignore it. Living in Arizona, it's not uncommon for the hot tire pressure to be 2-3 psi more than cold. My understanding is that 10 degrees of tire temperature will equate to one psi. When I get a chance, I'll compare tire temperatures with my IR Thermometer to see if this is correct.

dhlocker
User Rank
Iron
Re: OTR Truck Tire Pressure Monitoring
dhlocker   4/29/2015 9:19:54 AM
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Sadly, most failures occur between inspections and end with fairly catastrophic events. It would be wonderful if inspections could catch all incipient failures, but they can't and won't.

On a recent 1200 mile drive, I observed three trailers (one light, two laden) with inner tires disintegrating. One was easily identified by the burning rubber smell when approaching from behind; one was merely flapping about as it destroyed itself; and one disintegrated in the oncoming traffic lanes about 100 yards ahead of my position, scattering cars around it as the dodged the flying debris.

Doing nothing about such preventable dangers is irresponsible.

pelengr17
User Rank
Silver
Re: OTR Truck Tire Pressure Monitoring
pelengr17   4/29/2015 8:56:04 AM
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The statement that TPM isn't required on OTR trucks might be one of the most ingnorant things I've ever read on Design News!  Drivers are trained and required to do a series of checks at the start of every shift. Those checks include checking tires. There is required paperwork to track the checks and there are fines if they don't do it.  Trucks are also subject to regular inspections by the company that owns them.  OTR trucks are also checked at scales on major highways where it isn't uncommon for inspections to take place and they can be pulled over at anytime by the DOT cars for inspections.  I have a good friend that runs a trucking company.  They take very good care of their trucks and they get inspected by the DOT at scales all the time.

How many consumer vehicle owners do you know that do a walk around of their car or pickup and check tires for pressure and wear, all the lights for proper operation, engine fluids, suspension systems, steering components, and more before they drive off to work in the morning?   I'm not saying every OTR driver does it correctly or a good job but they are also liable for failure to do so when something goes wrong.  Either way it is a 15 min check they are required to do.

YJ77
User Rank
Silver
OTR Truck Tire Pressure Monitoring
YJ77   4/29/2015 8:26:04 AM
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I think it's insane that we require TPM on cars & light trucks, but not on OTR heavy trucks.  A blowout caused by running an underinflated tire on a passanger car or mini-van is a problem, but tire failures on OTR trucks may involve several more vehicles, with devestating outcomes.

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