HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Guest Blogs

Reducing Risk Through Integrated Advanced Development

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 2 Next >
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/2
Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The 5% rule
Alexander Wolfe   3/6/2012 6:32:24 PM
NO RATINGS
For most companies, five percent devoted to assessment is a more manageable and realistic goal than the 20% that Google supposedly allows employs to devote to researching stuff that's not part of their job. At the same time, even 5% is a lot in the high-pressure, fast time-to-market, lower headcount world many of us work in. Let's hope they take your advice, Bill.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
The 5% rule
Charles Murray   3/6/2012 6:03:49 PM
NO RATINGS
Nice article. The 5% recommendation for advanced development time is reminiscent of the old (maybe it's still exists) 10% rule at 3M. As I recall, 3M actually used to allow engineers to set aside 10% of their time to work on any kind of development (advanced or otherwise). I believe that's how Post-It Notes were created.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: It boils down to process improvement
Dave Palmer   3/6/2012 4:22:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Bill, I hope companies will pay attention to your recommendation that engineers should be spending 2 - 3 hours a week on advanced development activities.   It's absolutely essential for engineers to stay on top of the latest technology -- as much for their own good as for the good of their employers.  And it's essential to do your homework before embarking on a new project.  To a large extent, the success of a project is determined before the project starts.  The best solution is a continuous commitment to advanced development.

Bill Devenish
User Rank
Blogger
Re: It boils down to process improvement
Bill Devenish   3/6/2012 10:39:26 AM
NO RATINGS
Beth, thank you for your comments.  You have highlighted another topic that I will be writing about soon, and that is the tendency for development teams to stick with only one design concept, which creates a ripple effect of difficulties in later stages of the project.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
It boils down to process improvement
Beth Stackpole   3/6/2012 8:01:07 AM
NO RATINGS
I think Bill shines some light on a big issue that doesn't get the due it deserves in terms of advancing the cause of more effective, more efficient product development. Process improvement is one of those necessary evils that people love to gloss over, particularly engineers who often want to cut to the chase of tinkering with and discovering new innovations without being burdened by what they see as boring, institutional boilerplate.

In reality, that mentality couldn't be more wrong. Bill lays out the very strong case for instituting processes within engineering that not only enourage and promote the exploration of advanced technologies throughout the entire engineering team, but also to do so early on in the cycle so potential problems and potential better solutions are found earlier, rather than later when it is too late and far too expensive to make changes.

<<  <  Page 2/2
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Guest Blogs
Watch BMW's newest electric car, the i3, being charged with an everyday Home Depot-rented, gas-powered generator.
Asking yourself the simple question, “Is this a strength problem or a stiffness problem?” can prevent many design mistakes.
In November, a European space probe will try to land on the surface of a comet moving at about 84,000 mph and rotating with a period of 12.7 hours. Many factors make positioning the probe for the landing an engineering challenge.
Mistakes in power distributions are not all that common, but they do exist. We look at some of these mistakes and disaster scenarios with the intention being to inform readers to be wary of repeating such mistakes when designing their power distribution system.
What do gears, bearings, and shafts have in common? For one thing, they're often made out of steel. For another, they're subject to a failure mode known as rolling contact fatigue.
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development – A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service