HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Guest Blogs

PLCs Drive Down Costs for School Buses

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/2
mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Did it really need a PLC? A skill level issue?
mrdon   1/21/2014 2:26:42 PM
NO RATINGS
WilliamK

High school tech centers are chartered with teaching students about various technical fields such as welding, electronics, CAD, automotive repair, and industrial maintenance. Upon taking these classes, students will have good direction to take for careers to pursue after high school. The PLC solution would have made a good project for the electronic students to spec out the controller and all of the engine block heat management system components. Putting theory to practice is a good way to insure knowledge has be obtained by the students.

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Did it really need a PLC?
mrdon   1/21/2014 2:39:52 PM
NO RATINGS
WilliamK

The concept of automating the engine block heater management system allows the automation to turn these electrical devices on/off based on event inputs like temperature changes and time of day. The PLC engine block heater management system is quite complex in design. A timer system will not be able to manage the input events mentioned alone without some type of software. A central PLC helps in managing these events as well as turning on the heaters at the appropriate time. Future revisions for the system can be to alert maintenance workers the heaters are on energized and the time of day via a text message sent to their smartphones. A basic timer system would not allow future expansion based on new requirements.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Did it really need a PLC? A skill level issue?
William K.   1/21/2014 4:37:30 PM
NO RATINGS
@MrDon, In this area the school maintenance people and the bus drivers are highly unionized and so there is a huge element of "That's not my job" that gets in the way of just about any suggested change that would improve almost anything. So seeing that attitude has definitely reduced my thinking that our local staff would be able to complete such a project, or willing to even consider it. 

And while it certainly would be an educational project for students, although not to include the actual installation. But designing the system after determining the requirements would certainly be a good exercise. BUt the physical implementaion of such a system would indeed require a familiarity with a lot of things never covered in classes. I have had to fix several systems that had been created by educated individuals with inadequate practical experience, and the job was never fun.

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Did it really need a PLC? A skill level issue?
mrdon   1/21/2014 7:41:19 PM
NO RATINGS
WilliamK

Valid points. You hit the nail on the head in terms of projects for students: the instructor or teacher must have real world experience to guide the classroom to a successful conclusion. Practical knowledge and hands-on experience is vital to the project's success and the students enjoying the assignment.

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Common sense, individual heater efficiency and PS voltage...
Amclaussen   1/22/2014 12:38:31 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point GlennA.  That's why I'm happy of having studied Chemical Engineering. Even when I have worked in project engineering mostly during the last 35 years, and I really love mechanical eng. aspects, the chemistry knowledge has proven very valuable to me many times, and helps undestanding materials too.  The key in this matter you are commenting is about the capability of understanding a wide panorama of engineering subjects.  That's why I feel happy of not being too specialized, and always trying to keep as versatile as possible.  For me, engineers should become multi-disciplinary before becoming too focused into a too narrow field.

Years ago, I was attending an international seminar provided with an excellent simultaneous translator.  It happened that the gentleman doing the translations was blind from birth, and was a true multilingual person.  During a coffe break, he approached the coffe table and I felt the sincere impulse to congratulate him for his linguistic and technical knowledge (he had not studied any technical career, but he became so familiar doing technical translations that he speaked like a versed engineer!). So I asked him about his secret, saying to him: How did you learned so many languages and how did you achieved such a good command of the technical terminology?

He responded with a very charming answer, He said:

"Well, I don´t really SEE much TV, so I have some time to keep studying, And you know what, the tough one was about the third and fourth new languages... after those, every new one I learned was easier and easier!  Maybe because one starts to use the knowledge of the already learnt ones to understand the new one that you are trying to learn... That would be..."

That admirable capacity of joking about his own disability, and at the same time share his viewpoint made me admire him even more.  In engineering (and in many other fields, I guess, like medicine) this concept applies very deeply, so I'm convinced a true, died-in-the-wool engineer should be as versatile as possible, and that a multi-discliplinary approach even helps in finding when an specialist is not understanding the problem or becoming lost.  And while it is absolutely true that "Everyone can't know everithing", the current trend towards overspecialization is not producing better designs at all, and is the main reason "Made by Monkeys" is so enlightening!

In respect to the Buses problem, my suspiction is that the common type of engine heater is not too efficient.  Unless the applied power is large enough, the required heating time to reach the desirable engine block temperature is going to be longer, therefore increasing the overall thermal loses to ambient. I don't know if there are 220 VAC engine block heaters that could be more effective than 110 VAC ones. If one considers an smaller power heater, there would be a point where the lost thermal energy equals the suppied heating power, with no benefit but still consuming power during more time. Maybe a more powerful heater, fed at 220V would be still more effective and energy efficient (consider the wiring losses would be lower at 220V, in view of the wiring lenghts). I would revise this aspect in addition to the intelligent energy administration already done in this case. Amclaussen.

<<  <  Page 2/2
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Guest Blogs
The Smart Emergency Response System capitalizes on the latest advancements in cyber-physical systems to connect autonomous aircraft and ground vehicles, rescue dogs, robots, and a high-performance computing mission control center into a realistic vision.
Businesses cutting across industries are increasingly making use of portable display stands in the UK for marketing.
Igus retrofitted a car with 56 of its plastic iglide bearings to celebrate the brand's 30th anniversary. The car is currently being driven across the US and Canada.
The first and most obvious lesson of the following story is to remember to consider creep, along with all other potential failure modes.
Medical devices will look and feel different in the next 20 years, because, as design and product development people, our criteria are changing.
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 8 - 12, Get Ready for the New Internet: IPv6
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service