HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Guest Blogs

Folding Car Is the Ultimate City Vehicle

NO RATINGS
3 saves
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/3
embeddeddesigner
User Rank
Iron
Folding Car Is the Ultimate City Vehicle
embeddeddesigner   9/1/2012 9:34:02 AM
NO RATINGS
The front-opening car made by BMW during the reconstruction era WAS the Isetta:

- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isetta

I remember seeing them in the US in my childhood.

From what I have read, the driver was extremely vulnerable to head-on collisions. Most fatalities occured because the driver bled to death before he could be extricated from the car (This was before the jaws of lilfe).

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
And now here's something I hope you'll really like:
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   9/4/2012 1:05:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Hey Rocky! Lots of really good banter on both sides of the Safety/Crash-worth discussion. But to a completely different issue, that of getting into and out of tight parking spaces,  this car not only FOLDS, but all 4 wheels turn sharply, as it literally spins out of the parking space. Very unique, and impressive.

For a fun look at 60 year old technology that did something similar – check out this Cadillac video ---  Just for fun.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLSX1zbR2zI

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
FOLDING CAR
bobjengr   9/4/2012 6:05:36 PM
NO RATINGS
I will say one thing-- This is thinking outside the box.  I generally hate that phrase but I certainly feel it applies here.  No way would I take this car on the Interstate.  I do believe it might be OK for around town, provided defensive driving was practiced.  Can anyone tell me if it has air bags?  I suspect seat belts yes--air bags no?????  I would imagine great difficulty in trying to get this vehicle approved for sale in the US.

 

skywirelynx
User Rank
Iron
Too slow for US markets?
skywirelynx   9/12/2012 1:42:13 PM
NO RATINGS
This car looks cool, and would be fun to drive I think. However, as currently configured, I think it is too slow for even urban use in the US. According to the specifications listed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiriko#Specifications) in the Hiriko page of Wikipedia, it's limited to a top speed of 31 mph (50 kph). In the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex there are many streets within the urban commute that have 35 or 40 mph speed limits and traffic travels at least that fast except during rush hour (or when a police vehicle is pacing the "pack" - yeah, you know what I mean). I honestly don't know where one could practically use this car in the US. 

agriego
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too slow for US markets?
agriego   9/17/2012 3:37:34 PM
NO RATINGS
I suppose you could drive it around a country club or retirement village. With a top speed of 31 mph, it's just about useless for driving it around a city.

Just my $.02

Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Too slow for US markets?
Tool_maker   9/20/2012 1:06:28 PM
NO RATINGS
  I did notice the only other vehicles in this video are bicycles. That is the only thing I would share a road with in one of these things. It is a toy, pure and simple and to those people who think safety is no issue, check with your insurance carrier. This thing looks like a cute little coffin on wheels and I would not be caught dead in one, for fear that I would become dead in one.

  To those who compared this to a motorcycle I could not disagree more. When I rode I always felt one of the things  that helped keep me safe was the ability to see 360 degrees and the natural alertness that come with being exposed. I also had the ability to accelerate instantly if the need arose. I see none of those features in this vehicle.

  Lastly, I wonder what would occur if this thing got pinned between two vehicles in a collision. Is safety my only concern? Of course not, but it has to be a deal breaker for all but the careless single rich guy without responsibility.

<<  <  Page 3/3
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Guest Blogs
Manufacturers of plastic parts recognize the potential of conformal cooling to reduce molding cycle times. Problem is, conformal molds require additive manufacturing (AM), and technologies in that space are still evolving. Costs also can be high, and beyond that, many manufacturing organizations lack the knowledge and expertise needed to apply and incorporate additive technologies into their operations.
Machine vision and video streaming systems are used for a variety of purposes, and each has applications for which it is best suited. This denotes that there are differences between them, and these differences can be categorized as the type of lenses used, the resolution of imaging elements, and the underlying software used to interpret the data.
In the face of growing challenges for embedded technology engineers, designers should actually be designing for a new IoT -- the Internet of Tomorrow.
As today’s product design cycles are held to tighter schedules and budget constraints, it’s becoming even more critical to consider human factors up front to catch and fix problems during the initial development stages, when it’s faster and less costly to do so. Overlooking human factors at the beginning of the design cycle could lead to poor user experience, a decrease in effective product performance, and an increase in safety risk to the user.
Plastic part manufacturers are always looking for ways to reduce cycle time and get more productivity out of their injection molding machinery. One of the longstanding constraints in injection molding production has been cooling time. Removing parts from the mold before they have cooled induces warping or shrinking. But wait time works against productivity.
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
5/7/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
May 4 - 8, Designing Low Power Systems using Battery and Energy Harvesting Energy Sources
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Proto Labs
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service