HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Guest Blogs

Reducing Risk Through Integrated Advanced Development

NO RATINGS
< Previous Page 2 / 2
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/2
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
RE: the 5% rule
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   3/8/2012 12:50:22 AM
NO RATINGS

I should have replied to your post, but instead started an independent comment on this article.  I should have replied because I'm drawn to your comments as if you read my mind; it seems we have worked in the same places.  See my independent post a few paragraphs down the link, entitled, "Advance Dev is a seperate Group." Thanks for your comments!

Bill Devenish
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Advance Dev is a seperate Group.
Bill Devenish   3/8/2012 11:58:22 AM
NO RATINGS
Many companies I have worked with don't have the resources available for a separate group focused on Advanced Development. They barely have sufficient development resources to introduce new products with tight schedule constraints.  Therfore, allowing the development engineers a small portion of their time to investigate targeted technologies helps mitigate the risks to schedule and product quality. For Advanced Development to be effective I think it takes the commitment of visionary leadership and a management team who can see the big picture. For those companies that have the ability to support a separate Advanced Development team it becomes crucial that they provide for a smooth transition of the acquired knowledge to the product design team.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Advance Dev is a seperate Group.
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   3/8/2012 1:05:49 PM
NO RATINGS

Bill, I agree that a segregated AdvDev team takes big bucks – that's why I prefaced my comment with my history of working in giant corporations that are household names. They have the cash to afford that. Further, I concur to your point that transition of AdvDev into the product groups is a critical transition that often has roadblocks.  I have lived that, as well.  (the "NIH" {Not Invented Here} syndrome drives engineering egos all  too often).

All of your points, I have to say, are good valid approaches which I would also encourage smaller companies to try.  Except, in reality, the shared-time concept (the 5% idea) is theory not often successfully reduced to practice. 

gsmith120
User Rank
Platinum
RE: the 5% rule
gsmith120   3/8/2012 6:50:16 PM
NO RATINGS
Bob, I agree with your comments on design reviews.  Early in my career I was with a company that was really good about holding design reviews at multi-levels, inviting the right people and we always got really good feedback.  Now most companies I deal with believe "design review" is a dirty word or don't know what it mean.

Some common things I've found are companies don't hold design reviews, material is distributed at the design review or a day in advance, design is given to one independent person to review.  Trying to explain that people need time to review the material or even explain the importance of a design review was taking more years off my life they it was worth.

I don't think enough importance is put on design reviews, having the right people, providing sufficient time to review material to get good feedback can save a company time and money.  Ideally design reviews attendees are invited because their expertise is needed in a specific area, so what I would do is highlight for each attendee's specific area I would like them to review, if they didn't have time to review the entire package.  What I found was most would make time to review their specific area.  Otherwise, more times than not they wouldn't review anything.  I tell people if you have a review with no action items then most likely they didn't review the material.  When will some compaies learn pay me now or pay me later and if you pay me later it will cost you a lot more.

gsmith120
User Rank
Platinum
RE: the 5% rule
gsmith120   3/8/2012 6:54:53 PM
NO RATINGS
The 5% rule sounds great!! But like Bob said not in today's world.  I've had companies start out with something like that but it soon got lost in the "everything is HOT" so that 5% got eaten up by you trying to put out fires or just keep up with the daily duties. 

 

 

<<  <  Page 2/2
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Guest Blogs
Iterative design — the cycle of prototyping, testing, analyzing, and refining a product — existed long before additive manufacturing, but it has never been as efficient and approachable as it is today with 3D printing.
People usually think of a time constant as the time it takes a first order system to change 63% of the way to the steady state value in response to a step change in the input -- it’s basically a measure of the responsiveness of the system. This is true, but in reality, time constants are often not constant. They can change just like system gains change as the environment or the geometry of the system changes.
At its core, sound is a relatively simple natural phenomenon caused by pressure pulsations or vibrations propagating through various mediums in the world around us. Studies have shown that the complete absence of sound can drive a person insane, causing them to experience hallucinations. Likewise, loud and overwhelming sound can have the same effect. This especially holds true in manufacturing and plant environments where loud noises are the norm.
The tech industry is no stranger to crowdsourcing funding for new projects, and the team at element14 are no strangers to crowdsourcing ideas for new projects through its design competitions. But what about crowdsourcing new components?
It has been common wisdom of late that anything you needed to manufacture could be made more cost-effectively on foreign shores. Following World War II, the label “Made in Japan” was as ubiquitous as is the “Made in China” version today and often had very similar -- not always positive -- connotations. Along the way, Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, and other Pacific-rim nations have each had their turn at being the preferred low-cost alternative to manufacturing here in the US.
Design News Webinar Series
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 1 - 5, An Introduction to Embedded Software Architecture and Design
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service