HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Guest Blogs

Petroski on Engineering: Made in Japan

NO RATINGS
< Previous Page 2 / 2
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Making its mark
Beth Stackpole   11/30/2011 7:47:46 AM
NO RATINGS
Interesting that a reporter was so heavily immersed in trying to spread the cause of Japanese innovation. Somehow the rotating pencil design leaves me flat (and I suspect also the legions of consumers going gaga over tablets) given its relatively low-tech appeal. The erasable pencil is another story. Low tech, but high utility. Somehow, however, both don't seem in keeping with Japan's status as an innovative consumer products leader.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Making its mark
Dave Palmer   11/30/2011 10:38:48 AM
NO RATINGS
@Beth: As Professor Petroski alludes to, it's a cultural thing.  In general, writing implements are not highly valued in the U.S. - we buy them by the bag at the dollar store.  The cheaper the better, as long as they write.  There is a small circle of people who like fancy pens, but generally they are interested in ornate old-fashioned fountain pens, and are not interested in technical innovation.

Apparently, in Japan, writing implements are more prized.  As you mention, writing with pen and paper may be something of an anachronism in this day of mobile devices.  A fascination with anachronisms - combined with a fascination with technological innovation - fits with what I know about Japanese culture.

People in the U.S. like old things (as evidenced by this article by Charles Murray), and we also like new things, but we tend to keep them separate.  The Japanese have a talent for bringing the two together.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Making its mark
Beth Stackpole   11/30/2011 11:12:39 AM
NO RATINGS
Good perspective, Dave. I like the thinking re: bringing together the old and new in Japanese culture vs. our way of keeping separate.

 

 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Making its mark
Rob Spiegel   11/30/2011 11:16:58 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, this might be a cultural thing. But there is also a practical aspect to it. In the choices we have in writing tools, I haven't seen any advances that really improve on the cheap handful you buy at the dollar store. The mechanical pencils I've tried in recent years break fairly quickly. As for ballpoint pens, the expensive ones come with cartridges that run or dry up as quickly as the cheap ones -- even Cross.

I use pencils. The quality of pencils seems to be holding up. If we saw innovation in writing tools, and if those tools didn't fail so quickly, we might feel the same way the Japanese do.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Making its mark
Alexander Wolfe   11/30/2011 5:10:50 PM
NO RATINGS
A fascinating slice on engineering life as regards how cultural differences impact approaches to design. Since it's about writing implements, it makes me recall your groundbreaking book, The Pencil.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Self-rotating pencil
Charles Murray   11/30/2011 9:53:06 PM
Because I spent two years working as a draftsman in a bridge department, I can fully appreciate the value of a self-rotating lead. In my two years, I never quite got the hang of rotating my pencil and creating the uniform thicknesses that so many of our elder draftsman did so well. By comparison, my drawings always looked messy. I would have appreciated having such an item in the late '70s. The big problem, though, is that the idea is 30 years too late. Few engineers would even care about about self-rotating lead these days.  

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Sel-rotating pencil --> Pens-In-SPACE !
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   11/30/2011 10:50:23 PM
NO RATINGS

I too, appreciate the technique of rotating the pencil –comes from years on the drafting boards back in the 70’s – its how I was taught by the Mechanical Drafting instructor in high school, but its clearly a lost art today; what’s the point? (good pun,,,).  But your article took my mind somewhere else; contemplating why Japan would be so intrigued with pens & pencils.  It reminded me of  the story told when NASA put forth an R&D effort for Zero-Gravity pens so astronauts could write mission notes. Development ensued of a tiny, complex hydraulic system in a pen to always keep the ink flowing;  The story goes, that NASA was so proud of the invention that when they shared it with the Russian Space Agency, they were told that Russia also solved the same problem by using a #2 pencil. That anecdote always made me laugh.

kurturethane
User Rank
Iron
Re: Making its mark
kurturethane   12/1/2011 9:26:17 AM
NO RATINGS
As a pencil & pen geek myself and one who's fortunate to go to Japan once in a while, the big Japanese office supply stores are always on my agenda during a visit. The Japanese enthusiasm for small things and their focus on perfecting the details is evidenced in the quality of their writing instruments. I will agree that some of the things are gimmicky (30 years of R&D to perfect a self-rotating lead? I would've killed that project in the first year!). But on the whole, their offerings are very practical and priced well. I really enjoy their "fude pens" which are like calligraphy brushes and their disposable fountain pens, neither of which can be found in the U.S. (well, I just found a website called JetPens.com that sells the good Japanese stuff!)

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Petroski on engineering: in Japan
William K.   12/1/2011 10:24:12 AM
NO RATINGS
I was taught to rotate my pencil about the same time that I was first taught to write, which was probably in first grade, although the turning lessons may have come in second grade. I have used a lot of pencils and pens since then. I was in seventh grade when ball-point pens became the fad, and there certainly was, and still is, a huge spread in quality. Still today I use both wood and mechanical pencils, and it is still true that the quality spread in mechanical penciles is huge.

Today pencils and pens are mostly commodity items that don't occupy much of engineering's attention. Rather than attempt to find some small nich, most of our engineering is involved with more important things, such as increasing efficiency and reducing the use of resources. Our engineering tends to be more toward creating what never was, rather than polishing some comodity item that many others have already improved on many times.

Of course, there is also the marketing wonk driven push for product differentiation that some find so very important. That does seem to be a different way to waste talent and resources.

Walter
User Rank
Silver
Re: Making its mark
Walter   12/1/2011 1:45:38 PM
NO RATINGS
To be honest, who cares?  I haven't replaced the lead in my mechanical pencil in years even though I have a drawer full of leads of all types and colours.  I sharpen my wood pencil about once in six months.  A dispoable ballpoint lasts a year.  The paperless revolution is in the mopping up phase.

I've noticed that historically the biggest, most advanced of any technology is generally the last one before the whole concept goes obsolete.  Think of the Great Eastern, the B-36 and Cheop's Pyramid.

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Guest Blogs
In November, a European space probe will try to land on the surface of a comet moving at about 84,000 mph and rotating with a period of 12.7 hours. Many factors make positioning the probe for the landing an engineering challenge.
Mistakes in power distributions are not all that common, but they do exist. We look at some of these mistakes and disaster scenarios with the intention being to inform readers to be wary of repeating such mistakes when designing their power distribution system.
What do gears, bearings, and shafts have in common? For one thing, they're often made out of steel. For another, they're subject to a failure mode known as rolling contact fatigue.
The Smart Emergency Response System capitalizes on the latest advancements in cyber-physical systems to connect autonomous aircraft and ground vehicles, rescue dogs, robots, and a high-performance computing mission control center into a realistic vision.
Businesses cutting across industries are increasingly making use of portable display stands in the UK for marketing.
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development – A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service