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Haptic Feedback Takes UIs to Another Level

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William K.
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Re: After-the-Fact
William K.   3/17/2014 9:17:25 PM
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JT, my point exactly. Which shows that those marketing wonks are not nearly as smart as they tell us they are. But I already knew that.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: After-the-Fact
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   3/17/2014 3:23:26 PM
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Yes, William, agreed.  The remarkable point being that 21st century consumers willfully changed their paradigms of terminal keyboard input, all the while being coerced by a bright colorful, 'swipe-it' touch screen.   We only thought we'd miss the tactile response of key-press; but clearly, no-one does.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: After-the-Fact
William K.   3/12/2014 10:33:35 AM
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I can see some valuee of haptic feedback on a touchscreen keypad or keyboard, but for a whole lot of applications haptic feedback is just a battery wasting gimmic aimed toward that target of "product differentiation". One more attempt to one-up over some competing product, instead of improving actual quality. One more feature to fail.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
After-the-Fact
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   3/11/2014 11:12:17 AM
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Ten years ago while working in the Advanced Research Center at Motorola, we were experimenting with micro-pulses of 10 to 50 milliseconds to a conventional vibrator motor typically found in cell phones. The idea was to produce a very slight vibrational (haptic) feedback to the finger on a touchscreen QWERTY-UI. 

Our VP in charge of R&D clearly stated that, large tablet touch screens will never gain acceptance over conventional popple-dome input keys, because end-users need to feel the feed-back acknowledged during a successful key-stroke.  Obviously he was mistaken, and non-haptic feedback tablets and displays are absolutely pervasive today.  It seems almost a moot point now, to re-introduce haptics solely as an enhancement feature.

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