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Using Light-Curable Materials for Medical Device Applications

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Tony Ieraci
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Re: How About Other Applications?
Tony Ieraci   2/25/2014 3:01:21 PM
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You're right, Nancy, light-curing technology is often used in dentistry for applying prostheses like your crown. It is a highly specialized industry with its own set of requirements and standards, we're not currently involved in this market.

Nancy Golden
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Re: How About Other Applications?
Nancy Golden   2/21/2014 10:49:54 PM
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Thanks, Tony. I can certainly see the advantages of LCMs in the medical field. Is this the same technology used by dentists - I recall the use of what I assume was a light gun of some sort being held a brief amount of time on my tooth when my dentist was working on putting on a crown for me...

Tony Ieraci
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Re: How About Other Applications?
Tony Ieraci   2/21/2014 1:50:56 PM
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It really does depend on the customer, the application, and their requirements. Medical manufacturers may have a more stringent validation process (LCMs used in medical devices must be ISO 10993 approved), but at the end the LCMs must meet the requirements for each application.

Nancy Golden
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Re: How About Other Applications?
Nancy Golden   2/20/2014 11:31:04 PM
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Thanks, Tony - that makes sense. I would imagine that testing would be more stringent for medical applications and that different applications would have different minimum standards for different parameters that are specific to each application...

Tony Ieraci
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Re: How About Other Applications?
Tony Ieraci   2/20/2014 3:16:54 PM
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Thanks for your question, Nancy. There are many other applications for light-curable adhesives, coatings, maskants and other materials outside the medical industry. For example, light-curable conformal coatings are often used to protect PCBs from harmful moisture and dust; maskants are applied to aerospace compontents during metal-finishing processes; and optically clear laminates protect mobile device screens from scratch and wear. You probably come in contact with LCMs every day!

Nancy Golden
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How About Other Applications?
Nancy Golden   2/17/2014 11:47:54 PM
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Since there are so many advantages that make solvent-free LCMs a superior choice for bonding and adhesion that are listed in the article - While it has obvious advantages for the medical industry, I am wondering why it is only targeted towards medical applications? Are there other market segments that also make sense for LCMs?

Tony Ieraci
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Re: safer as well?
Tony Ieraci   2/13/2014 11:01:06 AM
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Thanks for the questions, @naperlou. These adhesives are tested to the ISO-10993 standard, Cytotoxicity, Hemolysis, Intracutaneous, Muscle Implantation and Systematic Toxicity, but the complete assembly must go through the qualification requirements for the finished product and its use.

Also, these materials are not for long term implant uses. These adhesives are to be used for bonding applications, like tube sets, needle bonding, face mask, electronic devices, catheters, etc. and also short term implants.

Tony Ieraci
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Re: Chemical Resistance
Tony Ieraci   2/13/2014 10:55:01 AM
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Great questions, Greg. First, this type of exposure would need to be tested with the finished product and not the adhesive alone.  Bond design and exposure time could affect the results from application to application. Finished assemblies are normally sterilized using EtO and/or GAMMA.  The adhesive is not affected by these standard sterilization methods. These are UV curable Acrylated Polyurethane based formulations.

Strength over time should not be an issue but again would need to be qualified with the true substrates and environmental requirements for each application.

Greg M. Jung
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Chemical Resistance
Greg M. Jung   2/12/2014 3:37:55 PM
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How does the chemical resistance of these light-curable materials compare when exposed to harsh disinfectant solutions?  Do they have equivalent performance when compared to regular adhesives?  Also, how does the bonding strength performance compare over time?

naperlou
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safer as well?
naperlou   2/12/2014 2:41:59 PM
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Tony, I assume that these materials are safer in medical contexts as well.  Is that the case.  How does that work.

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